scispace - formally typeset

Institution

Nuclear Threat Initiative

NonprofitWashington D.C., District of Columbia, United States
About: Nuclear Threat Initiative is a(n) nonprofit organization based out in Washington D.C., District of Columbia, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topic(s): Public health & Global health. The organization has 15 authors who have published 21 publication(s) receiving 851 citation(s).

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
08 May 2002-JAMA
TL;DR: Weapons disseminating a number of HFVs could cause an outbreak of an undifferentiated febrile illness 2 to 21 days later, associated with clinical manifestations that could include rash, hemorrhagic diathesis, and shock.
Abstract: ObjectiveTo develop consensus-based recommendations for measures to be taken by medical and public health professionals if hemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are used as biological weapons against a civilian populationParticipantsThe Working Group on Civilian Biodefense included 26 representatives from academic medical centers, public health, military services, governmental agencies, and other emergency management institutionsEvidenceMEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to January 2002 Retrieved references, relevant material published prior to 1966, and additional sources identified by participants were reviewedConsensus ProcessThree formal drafts of the statement that synthesized information obtained in the evidence-gathering process were reviewed by the working group Each draft incorporated comments and judgments of the members All members approved the final draftConclusionsWeapons disseminating a number of HFVs could cause an outbreak of an undifferentiated febrile illness 2 to 21 days later, associated with clinical manifestations that could include rash, hemorrhagic diathesis, and shock The mode of transmission and clinical course would vary depending on the specific pathogen Diagnosis may be delayed given clinicians' unfamiliarity with these diseases, heterogeneous clinical presentation within an infected cohort, and lack of widely available diagnostic tests Initiation of ribavirin therapy in the early phases of illness may be useful in treatment of some of these viruses, although extensive experience is lacking There are no licensed vaccines to treat the diseases caused by HFVs

645 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The threat from biological weapons, the nature of a bioterrorist attack and some of the issues that need to be addressed if the authors are to make meaningful progress to prevent or contain this disturbing and potentially catastrophic danger are provided.
Abstract: Only a few years ago bioterrorism was considered a remote concern but few today are complacent about the possibility of biological agents being intentionally used to cause widespread panic, disruption, disease and death. By its very nature, the biological weapons threat - with its close links to naturally occurring infectious agents and disease - requires a different paradigm than that for conventional terrorism, military strikes or attacks caused by other weapons of mass destruction. This evolving threat presents the medical, public health and scientific communities (importantly including biotechnology) with a set of difficult and pressing challenges. This article provides a brief overview of the threat from biological weapons, the nature of a bioterrorist attack and some of the issues that need to be addressed if we are to make meaningful progress to prevent or contain this disturbing and potentially catastrophic danger.

28 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The MECIDS alliance partnership exemplifies to other parts of the world that are experiencing conflict-like South Asia-that finding common ground is imperative to promoting health security and cooperation where it is most lacking and needed and that developing cohesive infectious disease control policies can build trust across the most difficult boundaries in the world.
Abstract: Disease surveillance networks in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and Africa are models for the kind of transnational cooperation that can mount the needed flexible and coordinated response to the spread of 2009 H1N1 influenza and future pandemic threats. For example, members of the Middle East Consortium on Infectious Disease Surveillance (MECIDS), a regional disease surveillance network of public health experts and ministry of health officials from Israel, the Palestinian Authority, and Jordan, have coordinated the screening, laboratory testing, and risk communication strategies to detect and control 2009 H1N1 influenza. This coordination is made possible by trust and by well-exercised national and regional pandemic preparedness policies. The consortium illustrates the value of regional disease surveillance networks in shaping and managing cohesive policies on current and future threats. The MECIDS alliance partnership also exemplifies to other parts of the world that are experiencing conflict—like Sout...

28 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
22 Jan 2019-JAMA
TL;DR: The United States and international community should launch high-level political mobilization, with diplomatic, human, and economic resources, to improve the safety and effectiveness of epidemic response operations in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Abstract: The Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is exceptionally dangerous, occurring within active armed conflict and geopolitical volatility, including a million displaced persons. With 421 cases, 240 deaths, and the numbers increasing, this Ebola outbreak is the second deadliest in history.1 Recent spread to Butembo, home to 1.2 million people, raised concerns. The DRC, World Health Organization (WHO), and partners are leading a vigorous international response, yet despite deploying an experimental vaccine, cases doubled in October 2018 and many cases had unknown origin. Uncontrolled Ebola outbreaks can expand quickly, as occurred in West Africa in 2014. Averting that outcome in the DRC requires rapid action including a strengthened public health response, security, and community outreach. If violence escalates, it could compromise a fragile response. Yet resources are insufficient. The United States and other countries are not permitting personnel deployment to the epicenter, including from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and US Agency for International Development (USAID). In this Viewpoint, we review recommendations of experts convened by Georgetown University and listed at the end of this article. The United States and international community should launch high-level political mobilization, with diplomatic, human, and economic resources. It is critical to recognize that future health crises will occur in fragile, insecure settings. To prepare, the international community needs long-term planning and enhanced capacities to improve the safety and effectiveness of epidemic response operations.

18 citations


Network Information
Related Institutions (5)
National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

59.4K papers, 573.4K citations

78% related

Russian Academy of Sciences

417.5K papers, 4.5M citations

77% related

Moscow State University

123.3K papers, 1.7M citations

75% related

National Academy of Sciences of Belarus

16.4K papers, 202.9K citations

75% related

Belarusian State University

7.2K papers, 155.5K citations

73% related

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20212
20207
20192
20151
20121
20111