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Institution

Saveetha University

EducationChennai, Tamil Nadu, India
About: Saveetha University is a education organization based out in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Materials science. The organization has 2339 authors who have published 2513 publications receiving 22245 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Syzygium cumini extract inhibits the proliferation ofOSCC cells and induces apoptosis through ROS accumulation and therefore, it could be used for the prevention of OSCC.
Abstract: Background Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (jambolan) is commonly used in Indian traditional medicine to treat a variety of diseases such as obesity, diabetes etc. The cytotoxic potential of S. cumini (SC) against oral cancer cell line remains elusive. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic effect of S. cumini in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell line (SCC-25 cells). Material and methods Oral squamous cell carcinoma cells are treated with different concentrations (10, 20, and 40 μg/mL) of S. cumuni for 24 hours and cytotoxicity was analyzed by MTT assay. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using the indicator dye, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. Apoptosis-related morphological changes were evaluated by dual acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) fluorescent staining and phosphatidylserine externalization was measured by annexin V assays. The protein and gene expression of cadherin-1 was evaluated by western blotting and PCR analysis. Results Syzygium cumini treatments caused cytotoxicity of OSCC cell line and induced intracellular ROS accumulation. This treatment also caused apoptosis-related morphological changes and externalization of phosphatidylserine in OSCC cells. Further, S. cumini treatments increased protein and gene expression of cadherin-1. Conclusion Syzygium cumini extract inhibits the proliferation of OSCC cells and induces apoptosis through ROS accumulation and therefore, it could be used for the prevention of OSCC.

456 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is necessary to evaluate the clinical utility of the individual metabolites in preventing malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia and to improve prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.
Abstract: BACKGROUND Metabolomics is the study of metabolome which describes the full repertoire of small molecules, and the analysis of salivary metabolomics may help in identifying tumor-specific biomarkers for early diagnosis and prediction of tumor progression. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical utility of salivary metabolites in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma. METHODS Salivary metabolomic profile of patients diagnosed with oral leukoplakia (n = 21) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (n = 22) was compared with apparently normal controls (n = 18) using Q-TOF-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. MassHunter profile software and Metlin database were used for metabolite identification. ANOVA to identify the regulation of metabolites between the three groups, t test (P < 0.05) to signify the changes between two groups, and chi-square test (P < 0.05) to indicate the presence or absence of metabolites in the study participants of the three groups were performed. RESULTS Significant upregulation of 1-methylhistidine, inositol 1,3,4-triphosphate, d-glycerate-2-phosphate, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, 2-oxoarginine, norcocaine nitroxide, sphinganine-1-phosphate, and pseudouridine in oral leukoplakia and OSCC was noted. Downregulated compounds in the diseased groups included l-homocysteic acid, ubiquinone, neuraminic acid, and estradiol valerate. CONCLUSION A range of salivary metabolites were significantly altered in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Further, it is necessary to evaluate the clinical utility of the individual metabolites in preventing malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia and to improve prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

413 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This is the first study reported on C. arnotiana mediated biosynthesis of copper nanoparticles, where it is predicted that the findings can pave way for a new direction in the field of nanotechnology and nanomedicine where there is a significant potential for antibacterial and antioxidant activities.
Abstract: Environment friendly methods for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles have become a valuable trend in the current scenario. The utilization of phytochemicals from plant extracts has become a unique technology for the synthesis of nanoparticles, as they possess dual nature of reducing and capping agents to the nanoparticles. In the present investigation we have synthesized copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) using a rare medicinal plant Cissus arnotiana and evaluated their antibacterial activity against gram negative and gram positive bacteria. The morphology and characterization of the synthesized CuNPs were studied and done using UV-Visible spectroscopy at a wavelength range of 350–380 nm. XRD studies were performed for analyzing the crystalline nature; SEM and TEM for evaluating the spherical shape within the size range of 60–90 nm and AFM was performed to check the surface roughness. The biosynthesized CuNPs showed better antibacterial activity against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli with an inhibition zone of 22.20 ± 0.16 mm at 75 μg/ml. The antioxidant property observed was comparatively equal with the standard antioxidant agent ascorbic acid at a maximum concentration of 40 μg/ ml. This is the first study reported on C. arnotiana mediated biosynthesis of copper nanoparticles, where we believe that the findings can pave way for a new direction in the field of nanotechnology and nanomedicine where there is a significant potential for antibacterial and antioxidant activities. We predict that, these could lead to an exponential increase in the field of biomedical applications, with the utilization of green synthesized CuNPs, due to its remarkable properties. The highest antibacterial property was observed with gram-negative strains mainly, E. coli , due to its thin peptidoglycan layer and electrostatic interactions between the bacterial cell wall and CuNPs surfaces. Hence, CuNPs can be potent therapeutic agents in several biomedical applications, which are yet to be explored in the near future.

397 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Syringic acid has a cytotoxic effect on human HepG2 cell line, and this might be a promising agent in anticancer research.
Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma is the second most common cause of cancer death in the world and its incidence has dramatically increased worldwide in the past two decades. Syringic acid (SA) has been studied for its hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, free radical scavenging, and antioxidant activities. We aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of SA against human hepatoma HepG2 cell line. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. HepG2 cells were treated with SA at concentration ranges of 25, 50, and 100 µM for 24 h. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression was investigated by dichlorofluorescein staining assay. Morphological changes of SA-treated HepG2 cells were evaluated by acridine orange (AO) and ethidium bromide (EB) dual staining. Apoptotic marker gene expressions were evaluated by qPCR. SA treatment caused significant cytotoxicity and liberation of ROS in HepG2 cells. AO and EB staining showed membrane blebbing and distortion in SA-treated cells. Apoptotic markers such as caspases 3 and 9, cytochrome c, Apaf-1, Bax, and p53 gene expressions were significantly increased upon SA treatment indicating the possibility of apoptosis induction in HepG2 cells. This treatment also caused significant downregulation of Bcl-2 gene expression. SA has a cytotoxic effect on human HepG2 cell line, and this might be a promising agent in anticancer research.

377 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
202365
2022146
2021771
2020766
2019229
2018202