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Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto

EducationOuro Preto, Brazil
About: Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto is a education organization based out in Ouro Preto, Brazil. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Raman spectroscopy. The organization has 5013 authors who have published 7992 publications receiving 98185 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
Bin Zhou1, Yuan Lu2, Kaveh Hajifathalian2, James Bentham1  +494 moreInstitutions (170)
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends in diabetes prevalence, defined as fasting plasma glucose of 7.0 mmol/L or higher, or history of diagnosis with diabetes, or use of insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs in 200 countries and territories in 21 regions, by sex and from 1980 to 2014.
Abstract: Background: One of the global targets for non-communicable diseases is to halt, by 2025, the rise in the age standardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels. We aimed to estimate worldwide trends in diabetes, how likely it is for countries to achieve the global target, and how changes in prevalence, together with population growth and ageing, are aff ecting the number of adults with diabetes. Methods: We pooled data from population-based studies that had collected data on diabetes through measurement of its biomarkers. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends in diabetes prevalence-defined as fasting plasma glucose of 7.0 mmol/L or higher, or history of diagnosis with diabetes, or use of insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs-in 200 countries and territories in 21 regions, by sex and from 1980 to 2014. We also calculated the posterior probability of meeting the global diabetes target if post-2000 trends continue. Findings: We used data from 751 studies including 4372000 adults from 146 of the 200 countries we make estimates for. Global age-standardised diabetes prevalence increased from 4.3% (95% credible interval 2.4-17.0) in 1980 to 9.0% (7.2-11.1) in 2014 in men, and from 5.0% (2.9-7.9) to 7.9% (6.4-9.7) in women. The number of adults with diabetes in the world increased from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (28.5% due to the rise in prevalence, 39.7% due to population growth and ageing, and 31.8% due to interaction of these two factors). Age-standardised adult diabetes prevalence in 2014 was lowest in northwestern Europe, and highest in Polynesia and Micronesia, at nearly 25%, followed by Melanesia and the Middle East and north Africa. Between 1980 and 2014 there was little change in age-standardised diabetes prevalence in adult women in continental western Europe, although crude prevalence rose because of ageing of the population. By contrast, age-standardised adult prevalence rose by 15 percentage points in men and women in Polynesia and Micronesia. In 2014, American Samoa had the highest national prevalence of diabetes (>30% in both sexes), with age-standardised adult prevalence also higher than 25% in some other islands in Polynesia and Micronesia. If post-2000 trends continue, the probability of meeting the global target of halting the rise in the prevalence of diabetes by 2025 at the 2010 level worldwide is lower than 1% for men and is 1% for women. Only nine countries for men and 29 countries for women, mostly in western Europe, have a 50% or higher probability of meeting the global target. Interpretation: Since 1980, age-standardised diabetes prevalence in adults has increased, or at best remained unchanged, in every country. Together with population growth and ageing, this rise has led to a near quadrupling of the number of adults with diabetes worldwide. The burden of diabetes, both in terms of prevalence and number of adults aff ected, has increased faster in low-income and middle-income countries than in high-income countries.

2,782 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Bin Zhou1, James Bentham1, Mariachiara Di Cesare2, Honor Bixby1  +787 moreInstitutions (231)
TL;DR: The number of adults with raised blood pressure increased from 594 million in 1975 to 1·13 billion in 2015, with the increase largely in low-income and middle-income countries, and the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase.
Abstract: Summary Background Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. Methods For this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure. Findings We pooled 1479 studies that had measured the blood pressures of 19·1 million adults. Global age-standardised mean systolic blood pressure in 2015 was 127·0 mm Hg (95% credible interval 125·7–128·3) in men and 122·3 mm Hg (121·0–123·6) in women; age-standardised mean diastolic blood pressure was 78·7 mm Hg (77·9–79·5) for men and 76·7 mm Hg (75·9–77·6) for women. Global age-standardised prevalence of raised blood pressure was 24·1% (21·4–27·1) in men and 20·1% (17·8–22·5) in women in 2015. Mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure decreased substantially from 1975 to 2015 in high-income western and Asia Pacific countries, moving these countries from having some of the highest worldwide blood pressure in 1975 to the lowest in 2015. Mean blood pressure also decreased in women in central and eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and, more recently, central Asia, Middle East, and north Africa, but the estimated trends in these super-regions had larger uncertainty than in high-income super-regions. By contrast, mean blood pressure might have increased in east and southeast Asia, south Asia, Oceania, and sub-Saharan Africa. In 2015, central and eastern Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and south Asia had the highest blood pressure levels. Prevalence of raised blood pressure decreased in high-income and some middle-income countries; it remained unchanged elsewhere. The number of adults with raised blood pressure increased from 594 million in 1975 to 1·13 billion in 2015, with the increase largely in low-income and middle-income countries. The global increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure is a net effect of increase due to population growth and ageing, and decrease due to declining age-specific prevalence. Interpretation During the past four decades, the highest worldwide blood pressure levels have shifted from high-income countries to low-income countries in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa due to opposite trends, while blood pressure has been persistently high in central and eastern Europe. Funding Wellcome Trust.

1,573 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
26 Jul 2016-eLife
TL;DR: The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries.
Abstract: Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries.

1,348 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review highlights the current knowledge about the roles of ANG-(1–7) in physiology and disease, with particular emphasis on the brain.
Abstract: The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key player in the control of the cardiovascular system and hydroelectrolyte balance, with an influence on organs and functions throughout the body. The classical view of this system saw it as a sequence of many enzymatic steps that culminate in the production of a single biologically active metabolite, the octapeptide angiotensin (ANG) II, by the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). The past two decades have revealed new functions for some of the intermediate products, beyond their roles as substrates along the classical route. They may be processed in alternative ways by enzymes such as the ACE homolog ACE2. One effect is to establish a second axis through ACE2/ANG-(1-7)/MAS, whose end point is the metabolite ANG-(1-7). ACE2 and other enzymes can form ANG-(1-7) directly or indirectly from either the decapeptide ANG I or from ANG II. In many cases, this second axis appears to counteract or modulate the effects of the classical axis. ANG-(1-7) itself acts on the receptor MAS to influence a range of mechanisms in the heart, kidney, brain, and other tissues. This review highlights the current knowledge about the roles of ANG-(1-7) in physiology and disease, with particular emphasis on the brain.

682 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work surveys the current state-of-the-art methods of ECG-based automated abnormalities heartbeat classification by presenting the ECG signal preprocessing, the heartbeat segmentation techniques, the feature description methods and the learning algorithms used.
Abstract: HighlightsSurveys the feature description methods, and the learning algorithms employed.Also surveys the ECG signal preprocessing and the heartbeat segmentation techniques.Description of databases used for methods evaluation indicated by the AAMI standard.Discussion of limitations and drawbacks of the methods in the literature.Concluding remarks and future challenges are also pointed out. An electrocardiogram (ECG) measures the electric activity of the heart and has been widely used for detecting heart diseases due to its simplicity and non-invasive nature. By analyzing the electrical signal of each heartbeat, i.e., the combination of action impulse waveforms produced by different specialized cardiac tissues found in the heart, it is possible to detect some of its abnormalities. In the last decades, several works were developed to produce automatic ECG-based heartbeat classification methods. In this work, we survey the current state-of-the-art methods of ECG-based automated abnormalities heartbeat classification by presenting the ECG signal preprocessing, the heartbeat segmentation techniques, the feature description methods and the learning algorithms used. In addition, we describe some of the databases used for evaluation of methods indicated by a well-known standard developed by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) and described in ANSI/AAMI EC57:1998/(R)2008 (ANSI/AAMI, 2008). Finally, we discuss limitations and drawbacks of the methods in the literature presenting concluding remarks and future challenges, and also we propose an evaluation process workflow to guide authors in future works.

635 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
202319
2022106
2021838
2020909
2019772
2018644