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Institution

University of Malaya

EducationKuala Lumpur, Malaysia
About: University of Malaya is a education organization based out in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Fiber laser. The organization has 25087 authors who have published 51491 publications receiving 1036791 citations. The organization is also known as: UM & Universiti Malaya.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016) provides a comprehensive assessment of prevalence, incidence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) for 328 causes in 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2016.

10,401 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The AWGS consensus report is believed to promote more Asian sarcopenia research, and most important of all, to focus on sarc Openia intervention studies and the implementation of sarcopenian in clinical practice to improve health care outcomes of older people in the communities and the healthcare settings in Asia.

2,976 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Bin Zhou1, Yuan Lu2, Kaveh Hajifathalian2, James Bentham1  +494 moreInstitutions (170)
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends in diabetes prevalence, defined as fasting plasma glucose of 7.0 mmol/L or higher, or history of diagnosis with diabetes, or use of insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs in 200 countries and territories in 21 regions, by sex and from 1980 to 2014.

2,782 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Kazunori Akiyama, Antxon Alberdi1, Walter Alef2, Keiichi Asada3  +403 moreInstitutions (82)
TL;DR: In this article, the Event Horizon Telescope was used to reconstruct event-horizon-scale images of the supermassive black hole candidate in the center of the giant elliptical galaxy M87.
Abstract: When surrounded by a transparent emission region, black holes are expected to reveal a dark shadow caused by gravitational light bending and photon capture at the event horizon. To image and study this phenomenon, we have assembled the Event Horizon Telescope, a global very long baseline interferometry array observing at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. This allows us to reconstruct event-horizon-scale images of the supermassive black hole candidate in the center of the giant elliptical galaxy M87. We have resolved the central compact radio source as an asymmetric bright emission ring with a diameter of 42 +/- 3 mu as, which is circular and encompasses a central depression in brightness with a flux ratio greater than or similar to 10: 1. The emission ring is recovered using different calibration and imaging schemes, with its diameter and width remaining stable over four different observations carried out in different days. Overall, the observed image is consistent with expectations for the shadow of a Kerr black hole as predicted by general relativity. The asymmetry in brightness in the ring can be explained in terms of relativistic beaming of the emission from a plasma rotating close to the speed of light around a black hole. We compare our images to an extensive library of ray-traced general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of black holes and derive a central mass of M = (6.5 +/- 0.7) x 10(9) M-circle dot. Our radio-wave observations thus provide powerful evidence for the presence of supermassive black holes in centers of galaxies and as the central engines of active galactic nuclei. They also present a new tool to explore gravity in its most extreme limit and on a mass scale that was so far not accessible.

2,589 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The main advantages of the current revised classification is that it provides a clear and unequivocal description of the various lesions and classes of lupus nephritis, allowing a better standardization and lending a basis for further clinicopathologic studies.
Abstract: The currently used classification reflects our understanding of the pathogenesis of the various forms of lupus nephritis, but clinicopathologic studies have revealed the need for improved categorization and terminology. Based on the 1982 classification published under the auspices of the World Health Organization (WHO) and subsequent clinicopathologic data, we propose that class I and II be used for purely mesangial involvement (I, mesangial immune deposits without mesangial hypercellularity; II, mesangial immune deposits with mesangial hypercellularity); class III for focal glomerulonephritis (involving or = 50% of total number of glomeruli) either with segmental (class IV-S) or global (class IV-G) involvement, and also with subdivisions for active and sclerotic lesions; class V for membranous lupus nephritis; and class VI for advanced sclerosing lesions]. Combinations of membranous and proliferative glomerulonephritis (i.e., class III and V or class IV and V) should be reported individually in the diagnostic line. The diagnosis should also include entries for any concomitant vascular or tubulointerstitial lesions. One of the main advantages of the current revised classification is that it provides a clear and unequivocal description of the various lesions and classes of lupus nephritis, allowing a better standardization and lending a basis for further clinicopathologic studies. We hope that this revision, which evolved under the auspices of the International Society of Nephrology and the Renal Pathology Society, will contribute to further advancement of the WHO classification.

2,004 citations


Authors

Showing all 25327 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Diederick E. Grobbee1551051122748
Intae Yu134137289870
Ovsat Abdinov12986478489
Jyothsna Rani Komaragiri129109782258
Odette Benary12884474238
Paul M. Vanhoutte12786862177
Irene Vichou12676272520
Ian O. Ellis126105175435
Louisa Degenhardt126798139683
Matthew Jones125116196909
Andrius Juodagalvis118106967138
Martin Ravallion11557055380
R. St. Denis11292165326
Xiao-Ming Chen10859642229
A. Yurkewicz10651451537
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
202391
2022418
20213,698
20203,646
20193,239
20183,203