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Institution

University of Mobile

EducationMobile, Alabama, United States
About: University of Mobile is a(n) education organization based out in Mobile, Alabama, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topic(s): Population & Convertible bond. The organization has 32 authors who have published 44 publication(s) receiving 508 citation(s). The organization is also known as: Mobile College.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is indicated that nurses need to remain active participants in the provision of mental health services to adolescents in poverty and increase their advocacy for the creation of policy changes that address mental health needs of this population.
Abstract: PROBLEM: Poverty and accelerations of inequality, manifested by the increasing difference between the richest and poorest populations, have significant effects on the mental health of vulnerable groups. Adolescents are vulnerable to the effects of poverty. As a time of change and transition for youth and their families, adolescence creates both challenges and opportunities to intervene in the effects of poverty. PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to discuss the significance of poverty and its impact on adolescent mental health and mental health services. SOURCES: An interdisciplinary literature search was conducted on the topic of poverty and adolescent mental health. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicated that nurses need to remain active participants in the provision of mental health services to adolescents in poverty and increase their advocacy for the creation of policy changes that address mental health needs of this population.

101 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The liberalization of attitudes toward homosexuality in the United States over the past 30 years is well documented. Despite these changes, substantial resistance to equality for gay men and lesbians remains. Previous studies indicate that beliefs about the etiology of homosexuality are central to this discussion. Those who believe homosexuality is innate are more favorable, while those who believe it is the result of a choice are more negative. Moreover, experimental research indicates that those with negative views actually become more opposed when a natural explanation is proposed. This study highlights the importance of perceived sources of epistemic and moral authority for understanding views of homosexuality. Using stances on culturally controversial issues involving “science and religion” as indicators of where individuals place authority, we outline the connection between perceptions of moral authority and attributions about homosexuality. Analyses of a national survey of American adults show that, net of controls, one’s stance on moral authority is the strongest predictor of attributions about whether homosexuality is chosen or innate.

47 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The participation of gays and lesbians in all aspects of society is continually disputed in the United States. Religion is one of the key battlegrounds. The extent to which religious congregations include lesbians and gays in congregational life is vital to the wider debate over homosexuality because congregations consistently influence more Americans than any other voluntary social institution reported by Putnam (Bowling alone: the collapse and revival of American community, Simon and Schuster, New York, 2000). Using nationally representative data from the 2006–2007 National Congregations Study this analysis investigates the level of acceptance of gays and lesbians within congregations as well as which congregations are most likely to allow lesbians and gays to become involved. I find that religious tradition, theological and political ideology, location, and demographic composition of congregations all influence the degree to which gays and lesbians are included into congregational life.

33 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Investigation of the safety and efficacy of consuming a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days in healthy, recreationally trained, college-aged men found no adverse effects.
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of consuming a preworkout supplement (SUP) containing caffeine, creatine, β-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days. We hypothesized that little to no changes in kidney and liver clinical blood markers or resting heart rate and blood pressure (BP) would be observed. In addition, we hypothesized that body composition and performance would improve in recreationally active males after 28 days of supplementation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, participants were randomly assigned to ingest one scoop of either the SUP or placebo every day for 28 days, either 20 minutes before exercise or ad libitum on nonexercise days. Resting heart rate and BP, body composition, and fasting blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. Aerobic capacity as well as muscular strength and endurance were also measured. Significant (P < .05) main effects for time were observed for resting heart rate (presupplementation, 67.59 ± 7.90 beats per minute; postsupplementation, 66.18 ± 7.63 beats per minute), systolic BP (presupplementation, 122.41 ± 11.25 mm Hg; postsupplementation, 118.35 ± 11.58 mm Hg), blood urea nitrogen (presupplementation, 13.12 ± 2.55 mg/dL; postsupplementation, 15.24 ± 4.47 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase (presupplementation, 34.29 ± 16.48 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.76 ± 4.71 IU/L), and alanine aminotransferase (presupplementation, 32.76 ± 19.72 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.88 ± 9.68 IU/L). Significant main effects for time were observed for body fat percentage (presupplementation, 15.55% ± 5.79%; postsupplementation, 14.21% ± 5.38%; P = .004) and fat-free mass (presupplementation, 70.80 ± 9.21 kg; postsupplementation, 71.98 ± 9.27 kg; P = .006). A significant decrease in maximal oxygen consumption (presupplementation, 47.28 ± 2.69 mL/kg per minute; postsupplementation, 45.60 ± 2.81 mL/kg per minute) and a significant increase in percentage of oxygen consumption per unit time at which ventilatory threshold occurred (presupplementation, 64.38% ± 6.63%; postsupplementation, 70.63% ± 6.39%) and leg press one-repetition maximum (presupplementation, 218.75 ± 38.43 kg; postsupplementation, 228.75 ± 44.79 kg) were observed in the SUP only. No adverse effects were noted for renal and hepatic clinical blood markers, resting heart rate, or BP. Supplements containing similar ingredients and doses should be safe for ingestion periods lasting up to 28 days in healthy, recreationally trained, college-aged men.

30 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20212
20192
20182
20173
20163
20153