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Institution

University of Provence

About: University of Provence is a based out in . It is known for research contribution in the topics: Galaxy & Population. The organization has 5550 authors who have published 8873 publications receiving 335083 citations. The organization is also known as: Université d'Aix-Marseille I & Aix-Marseille I.
Topics: Galaxy, Population, Adsorption, Turbulence, Redshift


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme (CAZy) database is a knowledge-based resource specialized in the enzymes that build and breakdown complex carbohydrates and glycoconjugates and has been used to improve the quality of functional predictions of a number genome projects by providing expert annotation.
Abstract: The Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme (CAZy) database is a knowledge-based resource specialized in the enzymes that build and breakdown complex carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. As of September 2008, the database describes the present knowledge on 113 glycoside hydrolase, 91 glycosyltransferase, 19 polysaccharide lyase, 15 carbohydrate esterase and 52 carbohydrate-binding module families. These families are created based on experimentally characterized proteins and are populated by sequences from public databases with significant similarity. Protein biochemical information is continuously curated based on the available literature and structural information. Over 6400 proteins have assigned EC numbers and 700 proteins have a PDB structure. The classification (i) reflects the structural features of these enzymes better than their sole substrate specificity, (ii) helps to reveal the evolutionary relationships between these enzymes and (iii) provides a convenient framework to understand mechanistic properties. This resource has been available for over 10 years to the scientific community, contributing to information dissemination and providing a transversal nomenclature to glycobiologists. More recently, this resource has been used to improve the quality of functional predictions of a number genome projects by providing expert annotation. The CAZy resource resides at URL: http://www.cazy.org/.

6,028 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Gerald A. Tuskan1, Gerald A. Tuskan2, Stephen P. DiFazio3, Stephen P. DiFazio2, Stefan Jansson4, Joerg Bohlmann5, Igor V. Grigoriev6, Uffe Hellsten6, Nicholas H. Putnam6, Steven G. Ralph5, Stephane Rombauts7, Asaf Salamov6, Jacquie Schein, Lieven Sterck7, Andrea Aerts6, Rishikeshi Bhalerao4, Rishikesh P. Bhalerao8, Damien Blaudez9, Wout Boerjan7, Annick Brun9, Amy M. Brunner10, Victor Busov11, Malcolm M. Campbell12, John E. Carlson13, Michel Chalot9, Jarrod Chapman6, G.-L. Chen2, Dawn Cooper5, Pedro M. Coutinho14, Jérémy Couturier9, Sarah F. Covert15, Quentin C. B. Cronk5, R. Cunningham2, John M. Davis16, Sven Degroeve7, Annabelle Déjardin9, Claude W. dePamphilis13, John C. Detter6, Bill Dirks17, Inna Dubchak18, Inna Dubchak6, Sébastien Duplessis9, Jürgen Ehlting5, Brian E. Ellis5, Karla C Gendler19, David Goodstein6, Michael Gribskov20, Jane Grimwood21, Andrew Groover22, Lee E. Gunter2, Björn Hamberger5, Berthold Heinze, Yrjö Helariutta23, Yrjö Helariutta8, Yrjö Helariutta24, Bernard Henrissat14, D. Holligan15, Robert A. Holt, Wenyu Huang6, N. Islam-Faridi22, Steven J.M. Jones, M. Jones-Rhoades25, Richard A. Jorgensen19, Chandrashekhar P. Joshi11, Jaakko Kangasjärvi23, Jan Karlsson4, Colin T. Kelleher5, Robert Kirkpatrick, Matias Kirst16, Annegret Kohler9, Udaya C. Kalluri2, Frank W. Larimer2, Jim Leebens-Mack15, Jean-Charles Leplé9, Philip F. LoCascio2, Y. Lou6, Susan Lucas6, Francis Martin9, Barbara Montanini9, Carolyn A. Napoli19, David R. Nelson26, C D Nelson22, Kaisa Nieminen23, Ove Nilsson8, V. Pereda9, Gary F. Peter16, Ryan N. Philippe5, Gilles Pilate9, Alexander Poliakov18, J. Razumovskaya2, Paul G. Richardson6, Cécile Rinaldi9, Kermit Ritland5, Pierre Rouzé7, D. Ryaboy18, Jeremy Schmutz21, J. Schrader27, Bo Segerman4, H. Shin, Asim Siddiqui, Fredrik Sterky, Astrid Terry6, Chung-Jui Tsai11, Edward C. Uberbacher2, Per Unneberg, Jorma Vahala23, Kerr Wall13, Susan R. Wessler15, Guojun Yang15, T. Yin2, Carl J. Douglas5, Marco A. Marra, Göran Sandberg8, Y. Van de Peer7, Daniel S. Rokhsar17, Daniel S. Rokhsar6 
15 Sep 2006-Science
TL;DR: The draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa, has been reported in this paper, with more than 45,000 putative protein-coding genes identified.
Abstract: We report the draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. Integration of shotgun sequence assembly with genetic mapping enabled chromosome-scale reconstruction of the genome. More than 45,000 putative protein-coding genes were identified. Analysis of the assembled genome revealed a whole-genome duplication event; about 8000 pairs of duplicated genes from that event survived in the Populus genome. A second, older duplication event is indistinguishably coincident with the divergence of the Populus and Arabidopsis lineages. Nucleotide substitution, tandem gene duplication, and gross chromosomal rearrangement appear to proceed substantially more slowly in Populus than in Arabidopsis. Populus has more protein-coding genes than Arabidopsis, ranging on average from 1.4 to 1.6 putative Populus homologs for each Arabidopsis gene. However, the relative frequency of protein domains in the two genomes is similar. Overrepresented exceptions in Populus include genes associated with lignocellulosic wall biosynthesis, meristem development, disease resistance, and metabolite transport.

4,025 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors considered the problem of finding an adapted pair of processes with values in Rd and Rd×k, respectively, which solves an equation of the form: x(t) + ∫ t 1 f(s, x(s), y(s)) ds + ∪ t 1 [g(m, x, s, g(m)) + y(m)] dW s = X.

2,812 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrogram, and a novel optical interferometer.
Abstract: The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 sq. deg of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-Object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 2350 sq. deg of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 sq. deg; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5,513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.

2,471 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors develop a novel theoretical framework to explain cross-language data, which they label a psycholinguistic grain size theory of reading and its development.
Abstract: The development of reading depends on phonological awareness across all languages so far studied. Languages vary in the consistency with which phonology is represented in orthography. This results in developmental differences in the grain size of lexical representations and accompanying differences in developmental reading strategies and the manifestation of dyslexia across orthographies. Differences in lexical representations and reading across languages leave developmental “footprints” in the adult lexicon. The lexical organization and processing strategies that are characteristic of skilled reading in different orthographies are affected by different developmental constraints in different writing systems. The authors develop a novel theoretical framework to explain these cross-language data, which they label a psycholinguistic grain size theory of reading and its development.

2,437 citations


Authors

Showing all 5550 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
H. J. McCracken14057971091
Bernard Henrissat139593100002
Jean-Paul Kneib13880589287
O. Le Fevre11743949368
Michael M. Merzenich11231650700
Christian Serre11041956800
Balaraman Kalyanaraman10047538562
O. Ilbert9833034634
Stéphane Viel9344242317
D. Maccagni8937332891
B. Garilli8832928570
V. Le Brun8522324909
L. Tresse8218123399
Guy Bertrand8257125734
S. de la Torre8127023839
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20221
20214
20207
201913
201810
201714