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Institution

VCU Medical Center

HealthcareRichmond, Virginia, United States
About: VCU Medical Center is a healthcare organization based out in Richmond, Virginia, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Poison control. The organization has 13118 authors who have published 17844 publications receiving 868064 citations. The organization is also known as: Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center & Medical College of Virginia.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The proportion of nosocomial BSIs due to antibiotic-resistant organisms is increasing in US hospitals, and in neutropenic patients, infections with Candida species, enterococci, and viridans group streptococci were significantly more common.
Abstract: Background. Nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Methods. Data from a nationwide, concurrent surveillance study (Surveillance and Control of Pathogens of Epidemiological Importance [SCOPE]) were used to examine the secular trends in the epidemiology and microbiology of nosocomial BSIs. Results. Our study detected 24,179 cases of nosocomial BSI in 49 US hospitals over a 7-year period from March 1995 through September 2002 (60 cases per 10,000 hospital admissions). Eighty-seven percent of BSIs were monomicrobial. Gram-positive organisms caused 65% of these BSIs, gram-negative organisms caused 25%, and fungi caused 9.5%. The crude mortality rate was 27%. The most-common organisms causing BSIs were coagulasenegative staphylococci (CoNS) (31% of isolates), Staphylococcus aureus (20%), enterococci (9%), and Candida species (9%). The mean interval between admission and infection was 13 days for infection with Escherichia coli, 16 days for S. aureus, 22 days for Candida species and Klebsiella species, 23 days for enterococci, and 26 days for Acinetobacter species. CoNS, Pseudomonas species, Enterobacter species, Serratia species, and Acinetobacter species were more likely to cause infections in patients in intensive care units ( ). In neutropenic patients, infections P ! .001 with Candida species, enterococci, and viridans group streptococci were significantly more common. The proportion of S. aureus isolates with methicillin resistance increased from 22% in 1995 to 57% in 2001 ( , trend P ! .001 analysis). Vancomycin resistance was seen in 2% of Enterococcus faecalis isolates and in 60% of Enterococcus faecium isolates. Conclusion. In this study, one of the largest multicenter studies performed to date, we found that the proportion of nosocomial BSIs due to antibiotic-resistant organisms is increasing in US hospitals.

4,084 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1983-Pain
TL;DR: Visual analogue scales (VAS) of sensory intensity and affective magnitude were validated as ratio scale measures for both chronic and experimental pain, demonstrating the valid use of VAS for the measurement of and comparison between chronic pain and experimental heat pain.
Abstract: Visual analogue scales (VAS) of sensory intensity and affective magnitude were validated as ratio scale measures for both chronic and experimental pain. Chronic pain patients and healthy volunteers made VAS sensory and affective responses to 6 noxious thermal stimuli (43, 45, 47, 48, 49 and 51 degrees C) applied for 5 sec to the forearm by a contact thermode. Sensory VAS and affective VAS responses to these temperatures yielded power functions with exponents 2.1 and 3.8, respectively; these functions were similar for pain patients and for volunteers. The power functions were predictive of estimated ratios of sensation or affect produced by pairs of standard temperatures (e.g. 47 and 49 degrees C), thereby providing direct evidence for ratio scaling properties of VAS. Vas sensory intensity responses to experimental pain, VAS sensory intensity responses to different levels of chronic pain, and direct temperature (experimental pain) matches to 3 levels of chronic pain were all internally consistent, thereby demonstrating the valid use of VAS for the measurement of and comparison between chronic pain and experimental heat pain.

3,440 citations

Book
31 Jul 1992
TL;DR: The LISREL Script for Rater Bias Model and Data for Simplex Model as mentioned in this paper is one of the most well-known models in the literature for gene expression analysis.
Abstract: Preface. List of Figures. List of Tables. 1. The Scope of Genetic Analyses. 2. Data Summary. 3. Biometrical Genetics. 4. Matrix Algebra. 5. Path Analysis and Structural Equations. 6. LISREL Models and Methods. 7. Model Fitting Functions and Optimization. 8. Univariate Analysis. 9. Power and Sample Size. 10. Social Interaction. 11. Sex Limitation and GE Interaction. 12. Multivariate Analysis. 13. Direction of Causation. 14. Repeated Measures. 15. Longitudinal Mean Trends. 16. Observer Ratings. 17. Assortment and Cultural Transmission. 18. Future Directions. Appendices: A. List of Participants. B. The Greek Alphabet. C. LISREL Scripts for Univariate Models. D. LISREL Script for Power Calculation. E. LISREL Scripts for Multivariate Models. F. LISREL Script for Sibling Interaction Model. G. LISREL Scripts for Sex and GE Interaction. H. LISREL Script for Rater Bias Model. I. LISREL Scripts for Direction of Causation. J. LISREL Script and Data for Simplex Model. K. LISREL Scripts for Assortment Models. Bibliography. Index.

3,317 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the physiological origins and mechanisms of heart rate variability, considered quantitative approaches to measurement, and highlighted important caveats in the interpretation of heart rates variability, and outlined guidelines for research in this area.
Abstract: Components of heart rate variability have attracted considerable attention in psychology and medicine and have become important dependent measures in psychophysiology and behavioral medicine. Quantification and interpretation of heart rate variability, however, remain complex issues and are fraught with pitfalls. The present report (a) examines the physiological origins and mechanisms of heart rate variability, (b) considers quantitative approaches to measurement, and (c) highlights important caveats in the interpretation of heart rate variability. Summary guidelines for research in this area are outlined, and suggestions and prospects for future developments are considered.

3,273 citations


Authors

Showing all 13133 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Ronald C. Kessler2741332328983
John Q. Trojanowski2261467213948
Nicholas G. Martin1921770161952
Michael Rutter188676151592
Kenneth S. Kendler1771327142251
Dorret I. Boomsma1761507136353
Martin B. Leon1631400129393
Nader Rifai144539104536
Ruth J. F. Loos14264792485
Thomas J. Smith1401775113919
Michael A. Moskowitz13952071904
Richard A. Deyo13948386769
Patrick F. Sullivan13359492298
Lelio Orci12849557552
Linda R. Watkins12751956454
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20233
202217
2021142
2020145
2019129
2018124