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Institution

Victim Support

NonprofitBristol, United Kingdom
About: Victim Support is a(n) nonprofit organization based out in Bristol, United Kingdom. It is known for research contribution in the topic(s): Mental health & Poison control. The organization has 25 authors who have published 25 publication(s) receiving 396 citation(s).

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Theoretical issues about male recipients of violence, about ways to offer support to men who experience violence through an understanding about the context of masculinities in men's lives, and about gender and theorizing in the field of criminology are raised.
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of an exploratory study of how men experience criminally defined physical violence. It places men's responses explicitly within a framework that takes masculinity seriously. This paper concludes by raising theoretical issues about male recipients of violence, about ways to offer support to men who experience violence through an understanding about the context of masculinities in men's lives, and about gender and theorizing in the field of criminology.

150 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results showed that participants with higherNEIS scores report fewer psychological symptoms relating to their traumatic experiences, that monitors are more likely to have higher NEIS scores than blunters, and that males had higher EI than females.
Abstract: The study investigated whether emotional intelligence (EI) can predict how individuals respond to traumatic experiences. A random sample of 414 participants (181 male, 233 female) were administered a measure of EI along with the Impact of Event Scale—revised [IES-R; Weiss, D. S. & Marmar, C. R. (1997). The Impact of Events Scale—revised. In J.P. Wilson & T.M. Keane (Eds.), Assessing psychological trauma and PTSD (pp. 399–411). New York: Guilford Press], and the monitoring and blunting questionnaire [MBQ, Anxiety Stress Coping 7 (1994) 53]. The results showed that participants with higher NEIS scores report fewer psychological symptoms relating to their traumatic experiences, that monitors are more likely to have higher NEIS scores than blunters. Traumatic events had a greater impact on females than males, and males had higher EI than females. The implications of these findings for using EI as a predictor for individuals who may experience traumatic stress are discussed.

95 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Lesley Malone1
Abstract: This article presents some of the key findings from a study of bereavement by homicide, based on interviews with bereaved people and personnel from Victim Support, the probation service, the police...

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: This exploratory study uses a post-modern framework to investigate and map aspects of the (re)emerging occupational area of forensic social work, broadly defined as practice, which in any manner may be related to legal issues and litigation, both criminal and civil. The study is the result of each author asking questions about the nature of our professional experience in the field and then testing our thoughts against those of other social workers in the field. Our aim was to initiate discussion about the nature of forensic social work and to question whether our work called upon skills and knowledge that differed from those of social workers in other (specialised) fields. We used a cooperative inquiry method and significant themes and issues were raised with agreement for much of the discussion. The most lively dialogue centred upon the benefit or disadvantage of specialisation, with tensions evident around the perceived elitism some participants attached to the specialist title. The initial investigatio...

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is indicated that trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy is feasible for treating traumatized children of an Asian population and the assessment of social functioning supported the effectiveness of the program.
Abstract: Background Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy is used to treat children who have experienced traumatic events and suffer from trauma-related disorders. Its effectiveness has been demonstrated in several randomized controlled studies. However, most of these studies have been performed in the United States, with few studies conducted in Asian countries. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy in children who have experienced traumatic events and who suffer from trauma-related disorders in Japan.

15 citations


Network Information
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20213
20207
20181
20152
20142
20111