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Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden

ArchiveMengla, China
About: Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden is a archive organization based out in Mengla, China. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Species richness. The organization has 2036 authors who have published 2864 publications receiving 66545 citations. The organization is also known as: Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xishuangbanna.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: GetOrganelle assemblies are more accurate than published and/or NOVOPlasty-reassembled plastomes as assessed by mapping and are able to reassemble the circular Plastomes from 47 datasets using GetOrganelle.
Abstract: GetOrganelle is a state-of-the-art toolkit to accurately assemble organelle genomes from whole genome sequencing data. It recruits organelle-associated reads using a modified “baiting and iterative mapping” approach, conducts de novo assembly, filters and disentangles the assembly graph, and produces all possible configurations of circular organelle genomes. For 50 published plant datasets, we are able to reassemble the circular plastomes from 47 datasets using GetOrganelle. GetOrganelle assemblies are more accurate than published and/or NOVOPlasty-reassembled plastomes as assessed by mapping. We also assemble complete mitochondrial genomes using GetOrganelle. GetOrganelle is freely released under a GPL-3 license ( https://github.com/Kinggerm/GetOrganelle ).

1,160 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
13 Sep 2012-Nature
TL;DR: These findings suggest that tropical protected areas are often intimately linked ecologically to their surrounding habitats, and that a failure to stem broad-scale loss and degradation of such habitats could sharply increase the likelihood of serious biodiversity declines.
Abstract: The rapid disruption of tropical forests probably imperils global biodiversity more than any other contemporary phenomenon(1-3). With deforestation advancing quickly, protected areas are increasingly becoming final refuges for threatened species and natural ecosystem processes. However, many protected areas in the tropics are themselves vulnerable to human encroachment and other environmental stresses(4-9). As pressures mount, it is vital to know whether existing reserves can sustain their biodiversity. A critical constraint in addressing this question has been that data describing a broad array of biodiversity groups have been unavailable for a sufficiently large and representative sample of reserves. Here we present a uniquely comprehensive data set on changes over the past 20 to 30 years in 31 functional groups of species and 21 potential drivers of environmental change, for 60 protected areas stratified across the world's major tropical regions. Our analysis reveals great variation in reserve 'health': about half of all reserves have been effective or performed passably, but the rest are experiencing an erosion of biodiversity that is often alarmingly widespread taxonomically and functionally. Habitat disruption, hunting and forest-product exploitation were the strongest predictors of declining reserve health. Crucially, environmental changes immediately outside reserves seemed nearly as important as those inside in determining their ecological fate, with changes inside reserves strongly mirroring those occurring around them. These findings suggest that tropical protected areas are often intimately linked ecologically to their surrounding habitats, and that a failure to stem broad-scale loss and degradation of such habitats could sharply increase the likelihood of serious biodiversity declines.

962 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Moinuddin Ahmed1, Kevin J. Anchukaitis2, Kevin J. Anchukaitis3, Asfawossen Asrat4, H. P. Borgaonkar5, Martina Braida6, Brendan M. Buckley3, Ulf Büntgen7, Brian M. Chase8, Brian M. Chase9, Duncan A. Christie10, Duncan A. Christie11, Edward R. Cook3, Mark A. J. Curran12, Mark A. J. Curran13, Henry F. Diaz14, Jan Esper15, Ze-Xin Fan16, Narayan Prasad Gaire17, Quansheng Ge18, Joelle Gergis19, J. Fidel González-Rouco20, Hugues Goosse21, Stefan W. Grab22, Nicholas E. Graham23, Rochelle Graham23, Martin Grosjean24, Sami Hanhijärvi25, Darrell S. Kaufman26, Thorsten Kiefer, Katsuhiko Kimura27, Atte Korhola25, Paul J. Krusic28, Antonio Lara10, Antonio Lara11, Anne-Marie Lézine29, Fredrik Charpentier Ljungqvist28, Andrew Lorrey30, Jürg Luterbacher31, Valérie Masson-Delmotte29, Danny McCarroll32, Joseph R. McConnell33, Nicholas P. McKay26, Mariano S. Morales34, Andrew D. Moy12, Andrew D. Moy13, Robert Mulvaney35, Ignacio A. Mundo34, Takeshi Nakatsuka36, David J. Nash37, David J. Nash22, Raphael Neukom7, Sharon E. Nicholson38, Hans Oerter39, Jonathan G. Palmer40, Jonathan G. Palmer41, Steven J. Phipps40, María Prieto32, Andrés Rivera42, Masaki Sano36, Mirko Severi43, Timothy M. Shanahan44, Xuemei Shao18, Feng Shi, Michael Sigl33, Jason E. Smerdon3, Olga Solomina45, Eric J. Steig46, Barbara Stenni6, Meloth Thamban47, Valerie Trouet48, Chris S. M. Turney40, Mohammed Umer4, Tas van Ommen13, Tas van Ommen12, Dirk Verschuren49, A. E. Viau50, Ricardo Villalba34, Bo Møllesøe Vinther51, Lucien von Gunten, Sebastian Wagner, Eugene R. Wahl14, Heinz Wanner24, Johannes P. Werner31, James W. C. White52, Koh Yasue53, Eduardo Zorita 
Federal Urdu University1, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution2, Columbia University3, Addis Ababa University4, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology5, University of Trieste6, Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research7, University of Montpellier8, University of Bergen9, Austral University of Chile10, University of Chile11, Australian Antarctic Division12, University of Tasmania13, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration14, University of Mainz15, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden16, Nepal Academy of Science and Technology17, Chinese Academy of Sciences18, University of Melbourne19, Complutense University of Madrid20, Université catholique de Louvain21, University of the Witwatersrand22, Hydrologic Research Center23, University of Bern24, University of Helsinki25, Northern Arizona University26, Fukushima University27, Stockholm University28, Université Paris-Saclay29, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research30, University of Giessen31, Swansea University32, Desert Research Institute33, National Scientific and Technical Research Council34, British Antarctic Survey35, Nagoya University36, University of Brighton37, Florida State University38, Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research39, University of New South Wales40, University of Exeter41, Centro de Estudios Científicos42, University of Florence43, University of Texas at Austin44, Russian Academy of Sciences45, University of Washington46, National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research47, University of Arizona48, Ghent University49, University of Ottawa50, University of Copenhagen51, University of Colorado Boulder52, Shinshu University53
TL;DR: The authors reconstructed past temperatures for seven continental-scale regions during the past one to two millennia and found that the most coherent feature in nearly all of the regional temperature reconstructions is a long-term cooling trend, which ended late in the nineteenth century.
Abstract: Past global climate changes had strong regional expression To elucidate their spatio-temporal pattern, we reconstructed past temperatures for seven continental-scale regions during the past one to two millennia The most coherent feature in nearly all of the regional temperature reconstructions is a long-term cooling trend, which ended late in the nineteenth century At multi-decadal to centennial scales, temperature variability shows distinctly different regional patterns, with more similarity within each hemisphere than between them There were no globally synchronous multi-decadal warm or cold intervals that define a worldwide Medieval Warm Period or Little Ice Age, but all reconstructions show generally cold conditions between ad 1580 and 1880, punctuated in some regions by warm decades during the eighteenth century The transition to these colder conditions occurred earlier in the Arctic, Europe and Asia than in North America or the Southern Hemisphere regions Recent warming reversed the long-term cooling; during the period ad 1971–2000, the area-weighted average reconstructed temperature was higher than any other time in nearly 1,400 years

885 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Recent progress made in starting to reveal the role of WRKY transcription factors in plant abiotic stresses is reviewed.

763 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review compares how fast plants need to move with how fast they can move with the velocity of climate change, which shows how much of a problem failure to track climate change is likely to be.
Abstract: In the face of anthropogenic climate change, species must acclimate, adapt, move, or die. Although some species are moving already, their ability to keep up with the faster changes expected in the future is unclear. 'Migration lag' is a particular concern with plants, because it could threaten both biodiversity and carbon storage. Plant movements are not realistically represented in models currently used to predict future vegetation and carbon-cycle feedbacks, so there is an urgent need to understand how much of a problem failure to track climate change is likely to be. Therefore, in this review, we compare how fast plants need to move with how fast they can move; that is, the velocity of climate change with the velocity of plant movement.

582 citations


Authors

Showing all 2049 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Jun Wang1661093141621
Shuai Liu129109580823
Yang Liu1292506122380
Bo Wang119290584863
Jun Yang107209055257
Jian Huang97118940362
Ram Oren9124126280
Peng Zhang88157833705
Fan Zhang7751730865
Peng Xu75115125005
Xi Chen6787719021
Li Li6785522796
Richard T. Corlett6325214498
Qiang Liu6065220634
Jing Li6054016506
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20239
202233
2021385
2020359
2019295
2018229