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JournalISSN: 0001-5172

Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 

About: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Intensive care & Bupivacaine. It has an ISSN identifier of 0001-5172. Over the lifetime, 10347 publication(s) have been published receiving 244116 citation(s).
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Two patients underwent thoracotomy for resection of pulmonary or esophageal carcinoma and regained motor and sensory functions 14 and 18 hours later, respectively, without sequelae.
Abstract: Two patients underwent thoracotomy for resection of pulmonary or esophageal carcinoma. Postoperatively, epidural catheters were inserted for pain management. Complaints of severe injection pain over the abdomen or lower extremities were made during one administration of pain medication. Progressive weakness and numbness developed over the lower trunk and lower extremities, with subsequent respiratory difficulties. Potassium chloride (KCl) was suspected to have been mistaken for normal saline as the diluent for morphine. In addition to endotracheal intubation and ventilatory support, steroids were administered both intravenously and epidurally to suppress spinal cord irritation. The two patients regained motor and sensory functions 14 and 18 hours later, respectively, without sequelae.

3,291 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Tanja Manser1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: This review examines current research on teamwork in highly dynamic domains of healthcare such as operating rooms, intensive care, emergency medicine, or trauma and resuscitation teams with a focus on aspects relevant to the quality and safety of patient care.
Abstract: Aims/background This review examines current research on teamwork in highly dynamic domains of healthcare such as operating rooms, intensive care, emergency medicine, or trauma and resuscitation teams with a focus on aspects relevant to the quality and safety of patient care Results Evidence from three main areas of research supports the relationship between teamwork and patient safety: (1) Studies investigating the factors contributing to critical incidents and adverse events have shown that teamwork plays an important role in the causation and prevention of adverse events (2) Research focusing on healthcare providers' perceptions of teamwork demonstrated that (a) staff's perceptions of teamwork and attitudes toward safety-relevant team behavior were related to the quality and safety of patient care and (b) perceptions of teamwork and leadership style are associated with staff well-being, which may impact clinician' ability to provide safe patient care (3) Observational studies on teamwork behaviors related to high clinical performance have identified patterns of communication, coordination, and leadership that support effective teamwork Conclusion In recent years, research using diverse methodological approaches has led to significant progress in team research in healthcare The challenge for future research is to further develop and validate instruments for team performance assessment and to develop sound theoretical models of team performance in dynamic medical domains integrating evidence from all three areas of team research identified in this review This will help to improve team training efforts and aid the design of clinical work systems supporting effective teamwork and safe patient care

928 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
B. Lachmann1, B. Robertson1, J. Vogel1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: Using adult guinea‐pigs, an experimental model in which alveolar surfactant phospholipids are removed by repeated lung lavage in viao, and in which the short‐term survival of the animals is ensured by artificial ventilation is proposed.
Abstract: Using adult guinea-pigs, we have developed an experimental model in which alveolar surfactant phospholipids are removed by repeated lung lavage in vivo, and in which the short-term survival of the animals is ensured by artificial ventilation. Blood gases, parameters of lung mechanics, and histologic and electron microscopic findings indicate that the lavage procedure induces a condition similar to the adult respiratory distress syndrome. We propose that our technique might be used for evaluation of pharmacological agents and various forms of artificial ventilation which have been suggested for treatment of this disease.

604 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Philip R. Bromage1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: Lumbar epidural blockade has been used in a series of 659 patients to compare the analgesic properties of lidocaine and prilocaine.
Abstract: SUMMARY Lumbar epidural blockade has been used in a series of 659 patients to compare the analgesic properties of lidocaine and prilocaine. Solutions of both compounds were compared as hydrochloride salts in 2% and 3% concentration with and without adrenaline 1:200,000. Solutions of base, made soluble by equilibration with carbon dioxide at a pC02 of 700 mm Hg were also compared in concentrations of 1.75% for lidocaine and 1.71% for prilocaine. Comparisons were based on measurements of latency, spread of analgesia, intensity of motor blockade and duration of analgesia. The quality of blockade in all the test solutions was increased by the addition of 1:200,000 adrenaline. Prilocaine has a slow latency compared with lidocaine, but in plain solution its duration is longer than that of lidocaine. The 3% hydrochloride solutions have no practical advantage over die 2% solutions for epidural blockade. Analgesia resulting from the C02-base solutions is superior in every respect to the blockade produced by equivalent concentrations of the hydrochloride salts.

600 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
H. Berg1, Jørgen Viby-Mogensen1, J. Roed1, C. R. Mortensen1  +3 moreInstitutions (1)
TL;DR: The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of POPC following the use of pancuronium, atracurium, and vecuronium and to examine the effect of residual neuromuscular block on the incidence.
Abstract: Background: After anaesthesia involving pancuronium a high incidence of both residual neuromuscular block and postoperative pulmonary complications (POPC) has been reported. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of POPC following the use of pancuronium, atracurium, and vecuronium, and to examine the effect of residual neuromuscular block on the incidence of POPC. Methods: A total of 691 adult patients undergoing abdominal, gynaecological, or orthopaedic surgery under general anaesthesia were randomised to receive either pancuronium, atracurium, or vecuronium. Perioperatively, the response to train-of-four (TOF) nerve stimulation was evaluated manually. Post-operatively, the TOF ratios were measured mechanomyograph-ically, and through a 6-day follow-up the patients were examined for pulmonary complications. Results: The incidence of residual block, defined as a TOF ratio <0.7, was significantly higher in the pancuronium group (59/226: 26%) than in the atracurium/vecuronium groups (24/450: 5.3%). In the pancuronium group, significantly more patients with residual block developed POPC (10/59: 16.9%) as compared to patients without residual block (8/167 4.8%). In the atracurium/vecuronium groups, the incidence of POPC was not significantly different in patients with (1/24: 4.2%) or without (23/426: 5.4%) residual block. Multiple regression analysis indicated that abdominal surgery, age, long-lasting surgery, and a TOF ratio<0.7 following the use of pancuronium were potential risk factors for the development of POPC. Conclusion: Postoperative residual block caused by pancuronium is a significant risk factor for development of POPC.

581 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
2021226
2020207
2019208
2018197
2017170
2016177