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JournalISSN: 1748-8842

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology 

Emerald Publishing Limited
About: Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology is an academic journal published by Emerald Publishing Limited. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Aerodynamics & Airfoil. It has an ISSN identifier of 1748-8842. Over the lifetime, 2692 publications have been published receiving 19279 citations. The journal is also known as: Aircraft engineering & aerospace technology.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe a six-degree-of-freedom control with six motors, each having a ground abutment, for simulating flight conditions in the training of pilots.
Abstract: This paper describes a mechanism which has six degrees of freedom, controlled in any combination by six motors, each having a ground abutment. It is considered that by its particular arrangement, this mechanism may form an elegant design for simulating flight conditions in the training of pilots. Unlike most simulators, it has no fixed axes relative to the ground, and therefore within the limits of amplitude of the design it can truly simulate the conditions of banking by carrying the simulation of control surfaces into the axes of the new attitude. Variations in control arrangements are described and their respective design merits considered. Other possible uses for this mechanism are mentioned including automation of production.

839 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is convenient to develop reasoning in analytical terms and for simplicity to restrict the flow to two dimensions and the engineer will find special scope in this part of aerodynamics for graphical methods in the solution of particular problems.
Abstract: WE found, on experimental grounds in Article I, that the field of air‐flow past a short body of low resistance shape, such as an aerofoil, comprises two dissimilar parts: (a) a thin boundary layer enveloping the body and dominated by viscous effects, and (b) a motion outside the boundary layer in which viscosity is much less important. It will be remembered that in the external motion occur the large pressure changes, which, transmitted through the boundary layer, account for nearly all the lift and for part of the drag. These pressures we observed to be calculable from the velocities without appreciable error by Bernoulli's equation. In the present Article we confine attention to this external flow, assuming it to be steady, incompressible, and inviscid. Its dependence upon (a), already discussed to some extent, we ignore; the boundary layer is conceived to be everywhere very thin, so that the only role it plays is to allow of relative velocity at the surface of the body. The assumptions made, excepting that of incompressibility, will appear drastic, and it will not be surprising if some of our deductions prove discordant with experimental fact. Nevertheless, they lead to a theory which finds many applications and uses in real fluid motion, and, in particular, gives an intimate view of aerofoil flow that is very close to the truth. It is convenient to develop our reasoning in analytical terms and for simplicity to restrict the flow to two dimensions (Article 1, §5). But the engineer will find special scope in this part of aerodynamics for graphical methods in the solution of particular problems.

373 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The introduction of statistical methods into the analysis of aeronautical experimental data, whether for quality control in production, for the interpretation of the results of structural and aerodynamic laboratory experiments, or for airline operation, has been brought about only in recent years, it may by now be fair to assert that their advantages are no longer in dispute.
Abstract: WHILE the introduction of statistical methods into the analysis of aeronautical experimental data, whether for quality control in production, for the interpretation of the results of structural and aerodynamic laboratory experiments, or for airline operation, has been brought about only in recent years, it may by now be fair to assert that their advantages and even their indispensability are no longer in dispute. Hitherto, investigations on these lines have usually involved, explicitly or implicitly, only the ‘normal curve of error’ and allied considerations; owing, it may be thought, to the controllability of the various manufacturing or laboratory techniques, but also perhaps to the scarcity of data hitherto available. It may well be, however, that with the accumulation of information arising out of investigations planned with particular reference to the statistical analysis of their results the whole range of the apparatus for statistical analysis, usually confined to such fields as those of biology or economics, will be called into full play.

350 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, upper and lower limits to the shear modulus of honeycomb sandwich cores are obtained by application of the Unit Displacement and Unit Load methods in conjunction with simplifying assumptions as to the strain and stress systems respectively in the core.
Abstract: Simple expressions for upper and lower limits to the shear modulus of honeycomb sandwich cores are obtained by application of the Unit Displacement and Unit Load methods in conjunction with simplifying assumptions as to the strain and stress systems respectively in the core. The theory is given for cores built up from foil ribbons to form cells of general honeycomb form. Test methods for the experimental determination of the shear modulus are also discussed. Of these, the three‐point bending test on sandwich beams is considered most satisfactory and results of such tests on steel and aluminium foil honeycombs show good agreement with the theory.

208 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202372
2022180
2021198
2020128
2019141
2018155