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JournalISSN: 0095-2990

American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 

About: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Substance abuse & Poison control. It has an ISSN identifier of 0095-2990. Over the lifetime, 2464 publication(s) have been published receiving 71173 citation(s). The journal is also known as: Am. J. Drug Alcohol Abuse & The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse.


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TL;DR: Growing evidence suggests that behavioral addictions resemble substance addictions in many domains, including natural history, phenomenology, tolerance, comorbidity, overlapping genetic contribution, neurobiological mechanisms, and response to treatment, supporting the DSM-V Task Force proposed new category of Addiction and Related Disorders encompassing both substance use disorders and non-substance addictions.
Abstract: Background: Several behaviors, besides psychoactive substance ingestion, produce short-term reward that may engender persistent behavior, despite knowledge of adverse consequences, i.e., diminished...

807 citations

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TL;DR: Although Internet-addicted individuals have difficulty suppressing their excessive online behaviors in real life, little is known about the patho-physiological and cognitive mechanisms responsible for Internet addiction, and it is currently impossible to recommend any evidence-based treatment of Internet addiction.
Abstract: Background: Problematic Internet addiction or excessive Internet use is characterized by excessive or poorly controlled preoccupations, urges, or behaviors regarding computer use and Internet access that lead to impairment or distress. Currently, there is no recognition of internet addiction within the spectrum of addictive disorders and, therefore, no corresponding diagnosis. It has, however, been proposed for inclusion in the next version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder (DSM). Objective: To review the literature on Internet addiction over the topics of diagnosis, phenomenology, epidemiology, and treatment. Methods: Review of published literature between 2000–2009 in Medline and PubMed using the term “internet addiction.Results: Surveys in the United States and Europe have indicated prevalence rate between 1.5% and 8.2%, although the diagnostic criteria and assessment questionnaires used for diagnosis vary between countries. Crosssectional studies on samples of patients report high comorbidity of Internet addiction with psychiatric disorders, especially affective disorders (including depression), anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Several factors are predictive of problematic Internet use, including personality traits, parenting and familial factors, alcohol use, and social anxiety. Conclusions and Scientific Significance: Although Internet-addicted individuals have difficulty suppressing their excessive online behaviors in real life, little is known about the patho-physiological and cognitive mechanisms responsible for Internet addiction. Due to the lack of methodologically adequate research, it is currently impossible to recommend any evidence-based treatment of Internet addiction.

619 citations

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TL;DR: Results support the efficacy of MDFT, a relatively short-term, multicomponent, multitarget, family-based intervention in significantly reducing adolescent drug abuse and facilitating adaptive and protective developmental processes.
Abstract: Random assignment was made of 182 clinically referred marijuana- and alcohol-abusing adolescents to one of three treatments: multidimensional family therapy (MDFT), adolescent group therapy (AGT), and multifamily educational intervention (MEI). Each treatment represented a different theory base and treatment format. All treatments were based on a manual and were delivered on

467 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, two rating scales for measuring the signs and symptoms of opiate withdrawal are presented: Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS) contains 16 symptoms whose intensity the patient rates on a scale of 0 (not at all) to 4 (extremely).
Abstract: Two new rating scales for measuring the signs and symptoms of opiate withdrawal are presented. The Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS) contains 16 symptoms whose intensity the patient rates on a scale of 0 (not at all) to 4 (extremely). The Objective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (OOWS) contains 13 physically observable signs, rated present or absent, based on a timed period of observation of the patient by a rater. Opiate abusers admitted to a detoxification ward had significantly higher scores on the SOWS and OOWS before receiving methadone as compared to after receiving methadone for 2 days. Opiate abusers seeking treatment were challenged either with placebo or with 0.4 mg naloxone. Postchallenge SOWS and OOWS scores were significantly higher than prechallenge scores in the naloxone but not the placebo group. We have demonstrated good interrater reliability for the OOWS and good intrasubject reliability over time for both scales in controls and in patients on a methadone maintenance program. These scales are demonstrated to be valid and reliable indicators of the severity of the opiate withdrawal syndrome over a wide range of common signs and symptoms.

426 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: To improve the future health and well-being of women and their children, there is a continued need for well-designed studies of substance abuse treatment programming for women.
Abstract: Recent research has shown that women and men differ in substance abuse etiology, disease progression, and access to treatment for substance abuse. Substance abuse treatment specifically designed for women has been proposed as one way to meet women's distinctive needs and reduce barriers to their receiving and remaining in treatment. However, relatively few substance abuse treatment programs offer specialized services for women, and effectiveness has not been fully evaluated. This article reviews the literature on the extent and effectiveness of substance abuse treatment programming for women and provides an overview of what is known about the components of successful treatment programs for women. Thirty-eight studies of the effect on treatment outcomes of substance abuse treatment programming for women were reviewed. Seven were randomized, controlled trials, and 31 were nonrandomized studies. In our review, six components of substance abuse treatment programming for women were examined: child care, prenatal care, women-only programs, supplemental services and workshops that address women-focused topics, mental health programming, and comprehensive programming. The studies found positive associations between these six components and treatment completion, length of stay, decreased use of substances, reduced mental health symptoms, improved birth outcomes, employment, self-reported health status, and HIV risk reduction. These findings suggest that to improve the future health and well-being of women and their children, there is a continued need for well-designed studies of substance abuse treatment programming for women.

398 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202199
202089
201971
201882
201788
201685