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JournalISSN: 0003-5483

Anthropological Linguistics 

About: Anthropological Linguistics is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Grammar & Verb. It has an ISSN identifier of 0003-5483. Over the lifetime, 500 publications have been published receiving 4914 citations.
Topics: Grammar, Verb, Sociolinguistics, Noun, Phonology


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Journal Article
TL;DR: The authors found that urban youth languages fall into the category of what Halliday terms antilanguages, but differ from other instances of language manipulation such as argot, taboo, jargon, slang, secret languages, and in-law respect languages.
Abstract: Youths in several urban centers on the African continent are continuously creating their own languages in order to set themselves apart from the older generation. These languages also serve to bridge ethnic differences. Cases have been reported for Abidjan, Nairobi, Johannesburg, Kinshasa-Brazzaville, and Yaounde. We show that these urban youth languages have much in common, both in function and in the linguistic strategies that their speakers use. The strategies found are typical for conscious language manipulation in general. Languages that arise through lexical manipulation can be divided into four types according to their function and use. Urban youth languages fall into the category of what Halliday terms antilanguages, but differ from other instances of language manipulation such as argot, taboo, jargon, slang, secret languages, and in-law respect languages. The difference lies not only in their different functions, but also, and related to these, in a preference for the use of certain types of conscious manipulation above others. The primary function of these urban youth languages is to create a powerful icon of identity. The identity in question is established through the reversal of norms, and develops from an underdog type of identity to one aimed at reforming society.

201 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Anthropological linguistics, 47-60 the authors 1] and 3], the authors, are the most relevant works to our work. But they differ significantly in several ways.
Abstract: Anthropological linguistics, 47-60.

92 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The Nilo-Saharan number marking system as mentioned in this paper consists of singulatives, plurals, and a set of replacement markers, which is a predominating classificatory technique that appears to be relatively rare in other language families.
Abstract: Number marking on nouns is an inflectional category that languages apparently can do without. On the other hand, some languages or language families tend to have extremely rich number-marking systems. The Nilo-Saharan family provides a case in point. Here, we find a predominating classificatory technique that appears to be relatively rare in other language families (with the exception of neighboring Afroasiatic languages), consisting of singulatives, plurals, and a set of replacement markers. This article describes formal and semantic properties of this system from synchronic and diachronic points of view and explains its historical relative stability in Nilo-Saharan. Although few formal parallels for this type of number inflection are found elsewhere in the world, clear-cut functional parallels exist.

89 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This article argued that the term irrealis reflects a Jakobsonian view of grammatical categories as members of binary oppositions based on a single feature of meaning that is equally present in all contexts of use.
Abstract: It is argued here that the term irrealis reflects a Jakobsonian view of grammatical categories as members of binary oppositions based on a single feature of meaning that is equally present in all contexts of use. This notion of irrealis does not therefore fit well with more current views of categories as tokens of use organized around a prototype with which they share some but not necessarily all features, nor with the view that grammatical markers develop diathronically from meaningful lexical items as used in specific constructions.

87 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20201
20199
20187
201716
201642
20154