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arXiv: Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics 

About: arXiv: Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Telescope & Observatory. Over the lifetime, 11227 publications have been published receiving 161851 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This document introduces a stable, well tested Python implementation of the affine-invariant ensemble sampler for Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proposed by Goodman & Weare (2010).
Abstract: We introduce a stable, well tested Python implementation of the affine-invariant ensemble sampler for Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proposed by Goodman & Weare (2010). The code is open source and has already been used in several published projects in the astrophysics literature. The algorithm behind emcee has several advantages over traditional MCMC sampling methods and it has excellent performance as measured by the autocorrelation time (or function calls per independent sample). One major advantage of the algorithm is that it requires hand-tuning of only 1 or 2 parameters compared to $\sim N^2$ for a traditional algorithm in an N-dimensional parameter space. In this document, we describe the algorithm and the details of our implementation and API. Exploiting the parallelism of the ensemble method, emcee permits any user to take advantage of multiple CPU cores without extra effort. The code is available online at this http URL under the MIT License.

5,293 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT) as discussed by the authors is the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy gamma-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV.
Abstract: (Abridged) The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy gamma-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. This paper describes the LAT, its pre-flight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4x4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 x,y tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an 8 layer hodoscopic configuration with a total depth of 8.6 radiation lengths. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4 allowing a large field-of-view (2.4 sr). Data obtained with the LAT are intended to (i) permit rapid notification of high-energy gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and transients and facilitate monitoring of variable sources, (ii) yield an extensive catalog of several thousand high-energy sources obtained from an all-sky survey, (iii) measure spectra from 20 MeV to more than 50 GeV for several hundred sources, (iv) localize point sources to 0.3 - 2 arc minutes, (v) map and obtain spectra of extended sources such as SNRs, molecular clouds, and nearby galaxies, (vi) measure the diffuse isotropic gamma-ray background up to TeV energies, and (vii) explore the discovery space for dark matter.

3,046 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Adrian M. Price-Whelan, Brigitta Sipőcz, Hans Moritz Günther, P. L. Lim, Steven M. Crawford, Simon Conseil, David L. Shupe, Matt Craig, N. Dencheva, Adam Ginsburg, Jacob T VanderPlas, Larry Bradley, David Pérez-Suárez, M. de Val-Borro, T. L. Aldcroft, Kelle L. Cruz, Thomas P. Robitaille, Erik J. Tollerud, C. Ardelean, Tomáš Babej, Matteo Bachetti, A. V. Bakanov, Steven P. Bamford, Geert Barentsen, Pauline Barmby, Andreas Baumbach, Katherine Berry, F. Biscani, Médéric Boquien, K. A. Bostroem, L. G. Bouma, G. B. Brammer, Erik Bray, H. Breytenbach, H. Buddelmeijer, Douglas Burke, G. Calderone, J. L. Cano Rodríguez, Mihai Cara, José Vinícius de Miranda Cardoso, S. Cheedella, Y. Copin, Devin Crichton, D. DÁvella, Christoph Deil, Éric Depagne, J. P. Dietrich, Axel Donath, Michael Droettboom, Nicholas Earl, T. Erben, Sebastien Fabbro, Leonardo Ferreira, T. Finethy, R. T. Fox, Lehman H. Garrison, S. L. J. Gibbons, Daniel A. Goldstein, Ralf Gommers, Johnny P. Greco, Perry Greenfield, A. M. Groener, Frédéric Grollier, Alex Hagen, Paul Hirst, Derek Homeier, Anthony Horton, Griffin Hosseinzadeh, L. Hu, J. S. Hunkeler, Željko Ivezić, A. Jain, Tim Jenness, G. Kanarek, Sarah Kendrew, Nicholas S. Kern, Wolfgang Kerzendorf, A. Khvalko, J. King, D. Kirkby, A. M. Kulkarni, Ashok Kumar, Antony Lee, D. Lenz, S. P. Littlefair, Zhiyuan Ma, D. M. Macleod, M. Mastropietro, C. McCully, S. Montagnac, Brett M. Morris, Michael Mueller, Stuart Mumford, Demitri Muna, Nicholas A. Murphy, Stefan Nelson, G. H. Nguyen, Joe Philip Ninan, M. Nöthe, S. Ogaz, Seog Oh, John K. Parejko, N. R. Parley, Sergio Pascual, R. Patil, A. A. Patil, A. L. Plunkett, Jason X. Prochaska, T. Rastogi, V. Reddy Janga, Josep Sabater, Parikshit Sakurikar, Michael Seifert, L. E. Sherbert, H. Sherwood-Taylor, A. Y. Shih, J. Sick, M. T. Silbiger, Sudheesh Singanamalla, Leo Singer, P. H. Sladen, K. A. Sooley, S. Sornarajah, Ole Streicher, Peter Teuben, Scott Thomas, Grant R. Tremblay, J. Turner, V. Terrón, M. H. van Kerkwijk, A. de la Vega, Laura L. Watkins, B. A. Weaver, J. Whitmore, Julien Woillez, Victor Zabalza 
TL;DR: The Astropy project as discussed by the authors is an open-source and openly developed Python packages that provide commonly-needed functionality to the astronomical community, including the core package Astropy, which serves as the foundation for more specialized projects and packages.
Abstract: The Astropy project supports and fosters the development of open-source and openly-developed Python packages that provide commonly-needed functionality to the astronomical community. A key element of the Astropy project is the core package Astropy, which serves as the foundation for more specialized projects and packages. In this article, we provide an overview of the organization of the Astropy project and summarize key features in the core package as of the recent major release, version 2.0. We then describe the project infrastructure designed to facilitate and support development for a broader ecosystem of inter-operable packages. We conclude with a future outlook of planned new features and directions for the broader Astropy project.

2,286 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The first Gaia data release, Gaia DR1 as mentioned in this paper, consists of the positions, parallaxes, and mean proper motions for about 2 million of the brightest stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues.
Abstract: At about 1000 days after the launch of Gaia we present the first Gaia data release, Gaia DR1, consisting of astrometry and photometry for over 1 billion sources brighter than magnitude 20.7. We summarize Gaia DR1 and provide illustrations of the scientific quality of the data, followed by a discussion of the limitations due to the preliminary nature of this release. Gaia DR1 consists of: a primary astrometric data set which contains the positions, parallaxes, and mean proper motions for about 2 million of the brightest stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues and a secondary astrometric data set containing the positions for an additional 1.1 billion sources. The second component is the photometric data set,consisting of mean G-band magnitudes for all sources. The G-band light curves and the characteristics of ~3000 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars, observed at high cadence around the south ecliptic pole, form the third component. For the primary astrometric data set the typical uncertainty is about 0.3 mas for the positions and parallaxes, and about 1 mas/yr for the proper motions. A systematic component of ~0.3 mas should be added to the parallax uncertainties. For the subset of ~94000 Hipparcos stars in the primary data set, the proper motions are much more precise at about 0.06 mas/yr. For the secondary astrometric data set, the typical uncertainty of the positions is ~10 mas. The median uncertainties on the mean G-band magnitudes range from the mmag level to ~0.03 mag over the magnitude range 5 to 20.7. Gaia DR1 represents a major advance in the mapping of the heavens and the availability of basic stellar data that underpin observational astrophysics. Nevertheless, the very preliminary nature of this first Gaia data release does lead to a number of important limitations to the data quality which should be carefully considered before drawing conclusions from the data.

2,256 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrogram, and a novel optical interferometer as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 sq. deg of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-Object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 2350 sq. deg of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 sq. deg; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5,513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.

2,235 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
2021975
20201,073
20191,135
20181,133
2017918
2016948