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Showing papers in "arXiv: Learning in 2012"


Posted Content
TL;DR: Scikit-learn as mentioned in this paper is a Python module integrating a wide range of state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms for medium-scale supervised and unsupervised problems.
Abstract: Scikit-learn is a Python module integrating a wide range of state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms for medium-scale supervised and unsupervised problems. This package focuses on bringing machine learning to non-specialists using a general-purpose high-level language. Emphasis is put on ease of use, performance, documentation, and API consistency. It has minimal dependencies and is distributed under the simplified BSD license, encouraging its use in both academic and commercial settings. Source code, binaries, and documentation can be downloaded from this http URL.

28,898 citations


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TL;DR: A novel per-dimension learning rate method for gradient descent called ADADELTA that dynamically adapts over time using only first order information and has minimal computational overhead beyond vanilla stochastic gradient descent is presented.
Abstract: We present a novel per-dimension learning rate method for gradient descent called ADADELTA. The method dynamically adapts over time using only first order information and has minimal computational overhead beyond vanilla stochastic gradient descent. The method requires no manual tuning of a learning rate and appears robust to noisy gradient information, different model architecture choices, various data modalities and selection of hyperparameters. We show promising results compared to other methods on the MNIST digit classification task using a single machine and on a large scale voice dataset in a distributed cluster environment.

6,189 citations


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TL;DR: This paper proposes a gradient norm clipping strategy to deal with exploding gradients and a soft constraint for the vanishing gradients problem and validates empirically the hypothesis and proposed solutions.
Abstract: There are two widely known issues with properly training Recurrent Neural Networks, the vanishing and the exploding gradient problems detailed in Bengio et al. (1994). In this paper we attempt to improve the understanding of the underlying issues by exploring these problems from an analytical, a geometric and a dynamical systems perspective. Our analysis is used to justify a simple yet effective solution. We propose a gradient norm clipping strategy to deal with exploding gradients and a soft constraint for the vanishing gradients problem. We validate empirically our hypothesis and proposed solutions in the experimental section.

3,549 citations


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TL;DR: Overall, this chapter describes elements of the practice used to successfully and efficiently train and debug large-scale and often deep multi-layer neural networks and closes with open questions about the training difficulties observed with deeper architectures.
Abstract: Learning algorithms related to artificial neural networks and in particular for Deep Learning may seem to involve many bells and whistles, called hyper-parameters. This chapter is meant as a practical guide with recommendations for some of the most commonly used hyper-parameters, in particular in the context of learning algorithms based on back-propagated gradient and gradient-based optimization. It also discusses how to deal with the fact that more interesting results can be obtained when allowing one to adjust many hyper-parameters. Overall, it describes elements of the practice used to successfully and efficiently train and debug large-scale and often deep multi-layer neural networks. It closes with open questions about the training difficulties observed with deeper architectures.

1,587 citations


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TL;DR: This work considers the problem of simultaneously selecting a learning algorithm and setting its hyperparameters, going beyond previous work that attacks these issues separately and shows classification performance often much better than using standard selection and hyperparameter optimization methods.
Abstract: Many different machine learning algorithms exist; taking into account each algorithm's hyperparameters, there is a staggeringly large number of possible alternatives overall. We consider the problem of simultaneously selecting a learning algorithm and setting its hyperparameters, going beyond previous work that addresses these issues in isolation. We show that this problem can be addressed by a fully automated approach, leveraging recent innovations in Bayesian optimization. Specifically, we consider a wide range of feature selection techniques (combining 3 search and 8 evaluator methods) and all classification approaches implemented in WEKA, spanning 2 ensemble methods, 10 meta-methods, 27 base classifiers, and hyperparameter settings for each classifier. On each of 21 popular datasets from the UCI repository, the KDD Cup 09, variants of the MNIST dataset and CIFAR-10, we show classification performance often much better than using standard selection/hyperparameter optimization methods. We hope that our approach will help non-expert users to more effectively identify machine learning algorithms and hyperparameter settings appropriate to their applications, and hence to achieve improved performance.

1,004 citations


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TL;DR: A detailed analysis of a robust tensor power method is provided, establishing an analogue of Wedin's perturbation theorem for the singular vectors of matrices, and implies a robust and computationally tractable estimation approach for several popular latent variable models.
Abstract: This work considers a computationally and statistically efficient parameter estimation method for a wide class of latent variable models---including Gaussian mixture models, hidden Markov models, and latent Dirichlet allocation---which exploits a certain tensor structure in their low-order observable moments (typically, of second- and third-order). Specifically, parameter estimation is reduced to the problem of extracting a certain (orthogonal) decomposition of a symmetric tensor derived from the moments; this decomposition can be viewed as a natural generalization of the singular value decomposition for matrices. Although tensor decompositions are generally intractable to compute, the decomposition of these specially structured tensors can be efficiently obtained by a variety of approaches, including power iterations and maximization approaches (similar to the case of matrices). A detailed analysis of a robust tensor power method is provided, establishing an analogue of Wedin's perturbation theorem for the singular vectors of matrices. This implies a robust and computationally tractable estimation approach for several popular latent variable models.

842 citations


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TL;DR: It is demonstrated that an intelligent adversary can, to some extent, predict the change of the SVM's decision function due to malicious input and use this ability to construct malicious data.
Abstract: We investigate a family of poisoning attacks against Support Vector Machines (SVM). Such attacks inject specially crafted training data that increases the SVM's test error. Central to the motivation for these attacks is the fact that most learning algorithms assume that their training data comes from a natural or well-behaved distribution. However, this assumption does not generally hold in security-sensitive settings. As we demonstrate, an intelligent adversary can, to some extent, predict the change of the SVM's decision function due to malicious input and use this ability to construct malicious data. The proposed attack uses a gradient ascent strategy in which the gradient is computed based on properties of the SVM's optimal solution. This method can be kernelized and enables the attack to be constructed in the input space even for non-linear kernels. We experimentally demonstrate that our gradient ascent procedure reliably identifies good local maxima of the non-convex validation error surface, which significantly increases the classifier's test error.

738 citations


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TL;DR: This paper proposed marginalized SDA (mSDA) that addresses two crucial limitations of stacked denoising autoencoders: high computational cost and lack of scalability to high-dimensional features.
Abstract: Stacked denoising autoencoders (SDAs) have been successfully used to learn new representations for domain adaptation. Recently, they have attained record accuracy on standard benchmark tasks of sentiment analysis across different text domains. SDAs learn robust data representations by reconstruction, recovering original features from data that are artificially corrupted with noise. In this paper, we propose marginalized SDA (mSDA) that addresses two crucial limitations of SDAs: high computational cost and lack of scalability to high-dimensional features. In contrast to SDAs, our approach of mSDA marginalizes noise and thus does not require stochastic gradient descent or other optimization algorithms to learn parameters ? in fact, they are computed in closed-form. Consequently, mSDA, which can be implemented in only 20 lines of MATLAB^{TM}, significantly speeds up SDAs by two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the representations learnt by mSDA are as effective as the traditional SDAs, attaining almost identical accuracies in benchmark tasks.

688 citations


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TL;DR: This paper proposes to accelerate the computation of the l2, 1-norm regularized regression model by reformulating it as two equivalent smooth convex optimization problems which are then solved via the Nesterov's method---an optimal first-order black-box method for smooth conveX optimization.
Abstract: The problem of joint feature selection across a group of related tasks has applications in many areas including biomedical informatics and computer vision. We consider the l2,1-norm regularized regression model for joint feature selection from multiple tasks, which can be derived in the probabilistic framework by assuming a suitable prior from the exponential family. One appealing feature of the l2,1-norm regularization is that it encourages multiple predictors to share similar sparsity patterns. However, the resulting optimization problem is challenging to solve due to the non-smoothness of the l2,1-norm regularization. In this paper, we propose to accelerate the computation by reformulating it as two equivalent smooth convex optimization problems which are then solved via the Nesterov's method-an optimal first-order black-box method for smooth convex optimization. A key building block in solving the reformulations is the Euclidean projection. We show that the Euclidean projection for the first reformulation can be analytically computed, while the Euclidean projection for the second one can be computed in linear time. Empirical evaluations on several data sets verify the efficiency of the proposed algorithms.

630 citations


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TL;DR: In this paper, a probabilistic model based on distribution estimators conditioned on a recurrent neural network is proposed to discover temporal dependencies in high-dimensional sequences of polyphonic music.
Abstract: We investigate the problem of modeling symbolic sequences of polyphonic music in a completely general piano-roll representation. We introduce a probabilistic model based on distribution estimators conditioned on a recurrent neural network that is able to discover temporal dependencies in high-dimensional sequences. Our approach outperforms many traditional models of polyphonic music on a variety of realistic datasets. We show how our musical language model can serve as a symbolic prior to improve the accuracy of polyphonic transcription.

615 citations


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TL;DR: Using the insights gained from this comparative study, it is shown how accurate topic models can be learned in several seconds on text corpora with thousands of documents.
Abstract: Latent Dirichlet analysis, or topic modeling, is a flexible latent variable framework for modeling high-dimensional sparse count data. Various learning algorithms have been developed in recent years, including collapsed Gibbs sampling, variational inference, and maximum a posteriori estimation, and this variety motivates the need for careful empirical comparisons. In this paper, we highlight the close connections between these approaches. We find that the main differences are attributable to the amount of smoothing applied to the counts. When the hyperparameters are optimized, the differences in performance among the algorithms diminish significantly. The ability of these algorithms to achieve solutions of comparable accuracy gives us the freedom to select computationally efficient approaches. Using the insights gained from this comparative study, we show how accurate topic models can be learned in several seconds on text corpora with thousands of documents.

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TL;DR: The success of machine learning algorithms generally depends on data representation, and this is because different representations can entangle and hide more or less the different explanatory factors of variation behind the data as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The success of machine learning algorithms generally depends on data representation, and we hypothesize that this is because different representations can entangle and hide more or less the different explanatory factors of variation behind the data. Although specific domain knowledge can be used to help design representations, learning with generic priors can also be used, and the quest for AI is motivating the design of more powerful representation-learning algorithms implementing such priors. This paper reviews recent work in the area of unsupervised feature learning and deep learning, covering advances in probabilistic models, auto-encoders, manifold learning, and deep networks. This motivates longer-term unanswered questions about the appropriate objectives for learning good representations, for computing representations (i.e., inference), and the geometrical connections between representation learning, density estimation and manifold learning.

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TL;DR: This paper demonstrates that the simple variational methods of Blei et al. (2001) can lead to inaccurate inferences and biased learning for the generative aspect model, and develops an alternative approach that leads to higher accuracy at comparable cost.
Abstract: The generative aspect model is an extension of the multinomial model for text that allows word probabilities to vary stochastically across documents. Previous results with aspect models have been promising, but hindered by the computational difficulty of carrying out inference and learning. This paper demonstrates that the simple variational methods of Blei et al (2001) can lead to inaccurate inferences and biased learning for the generative aspect model. We develop an alternative approach that leads to higher accuracy at comparable cost. An extension of Expectation-Propagation is used for inference and then embedded in an EM algorithm for learning. Experimental results are presented for both synthetic and real data sets.

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TL;DR: The problem of function estimation in the case where an underlying causal model can be inferred is considered, and a hypothesis for when semi-supervised learning can help is formulated, and corroborate it with empirical results.
Abstract: We consider the problem of function estimation in the case where an underlying causal model can be inferred. This has implications for popular scenarios such as covariate shift, concept drift, transfer learning and semi-supervised learning. We argue that causal knowledge may facilitate some approaches for a given problem, and rule out others. In particular, we formulate a hypothesis for when semi-supervised learning can help, and corroborate it with empirical results.

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TL;DR: Experiments reported here evaluate the use of clipping gradients, spanning longer time ranges with leaky integration, advanced momentum techniques, using more powerful output probability models, and encouraging sparser gradients to help symmetry breaking and credit assignment.
Abstract: After a more than decade-long period of relatively little research activity in the area of recurrent neural networks, several new developments will be reviewed here that have allowed substantial progress both in understanding and in technical solutions towards more efficient training of recurrent networks. These advances have been motivated by and related to the optimization issues surrounding deep learning. Although recurrent networks are extremely powerful in what they can in principle represent in terms of modelling sequences,their training is plagued by two aspects of the same issue regarding the learning of long-term dependencies. Experiments reported here evaluate the use of clipping gradients, spanning longer time ranges with leaky integration, advanced momentum techniques, using more powerful output probability models, and encouraging sparser gradients to help symmetry breaking and credit assignment. The experiments are performed on text and music data and show off the combined effects of these techniques in generally improving both training and test error.

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TL;DR: This paper proposes a regularization formulation for learning the relationships between tasks in multi-task learning, called MTRL, which can also describe negative task correlation and identify outlier tasks based on the same underlying principle.
Abstract: Multi-task learning is a learning paradigm which seeks to improve the generalization performance of a learning task with the help of some other related tasks. In this paper, we propose a regularization formulation for learning the relationships between tasks in multi-task learning. This formulation can be viewed as a novel generalization of the regularization framework for single-task learning. Besides modeling positive task correlation, our method, called multi-task relationship learning (MTRL), can also describe negative task correlation and identify outlier tasks based on the same underlying principle. Under this regularization framework, the objective function of MTRL is convex. For efficiency, we use an alternating method to learn the optimal model parameters for each task as well as the relationships between tasks. We study MTRL in the symmetric multi-task learning setting and then generalize it to the asymmetric setting as well. We also study the relationships between MTRL and some existing multi-task learning methods. Experiments conducted on a toy problem as well as several benchmark data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of MTRL.

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TL;DR: This work presents an alternative algorithm based on stochastic optimization that allows for direct optimization of the variational lower bound and demonstrates the approach on two non-conjugate models: logistic regression and an approximation to the HDP.
Abstract: Mean-field variational inference is a method for approximate Bayesian posterior inference. It approximates a full posterior distribution with a factorized set of distributions by maximizing a lower bound on the marginal likelihood. This requires the ability to integrate a sum of terms in the log joint likelihood using this factorized distribution. Often not all integrals are in closed form, which is typically handled by using a lower bound. We present an alternative algorithm based on stochastic optimization that allows for direct optimization of the variational lower bound. This method uses control variates to reduce the variance of the stochastic search gradient, in which existing lower bounds can play an important role. We demonstrate the approach on two non-conjugate models: logistic regression and an approximation to the HDP.

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors formally justify nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) as a main tool in this context, which is an analog of SVD where all vectors are nonnegative.
Abstract: Topic Modeling is an approach used for automatic comprehension and classification of data in a variety of settings, and perhaps the canonical application is in uncovering thematic structure in a corpus of documents. A number of foundational works both in machine learning and in theory have suggested a probabilistic model for documents, whereby documents arise as a convex combination of (i.e. distribution on) a small number of topic vectors, each topic vector being a distribution on words (i.e. a vector of word-frequencies). Similar models have since been used in a variety of application areas; the Latent Dirichlet Allocation or LDA model of Blei et al. is especially popular. Theoretical studies of topic modeling focus on learning the model's parameters assuming the data is actually generated from it. Existing approaches for the most part rely on Singular Value Decomposition(SVD), and consequently have one of two limitations: these works need to either assume that each document contains only one topic, or else can only recover the span of the topic vectors instead of the topic vectors themselves. This paper formally justifies Nonnegative Matrix Factorization(NMF) as a main tool in this context, which is an analog of SVD where all vectors are nonnegative. Using this tool we give the first polynomial-time algorithm for learning topic models without the above two limitations. The algorithm uses a fairly mild assumption about the underlying topic matrix called separability, which is usually found to hold in real-life data. A compelling feature of our algorithm is that it generalizes to models that incorporate topic-topic correlations, such as the Correlated Topic Model and the Pachinko Allocation Model. We hope that this paper will motivate further theoretical results that use NMF as a replacement for SVD - just as NMF has come to replace SVD in many applications.

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TL;DR: A new learning method for heterogeneous domain adaptation (HDA), in which the data from the source domain and the target domain are represented by heterogeneous features with different dimensions, and it is demonstrated that HFA outperforms the existing HDA methods.
Abstract: We propose a new learning method for heterogeneous domain adaptation (HDA), in which the data from the source domain and the target domain are represented by heterogeneous features with different dimensions. Using two different projection matrices, we first transform the data from two domains into a common subspace in order to measure the similarity between the data from two domains. We then propose two new feature mapping functions to augment the transformed data with their original features and zeros. The existing learning methods (e.g., SVM and SVR) can be readily incorporated with our newly proposed augmented feature representations to effectively utilize the data from both domains for HDA. Using the hinge loss function in SVM as an example, we introduce the detailed objective function in our method called Heterogeneous Feature Augmentation (HFA) for a linear case and also describe its kernelization in order to efficiently cope with the data with very high dimensions. Moreover, we also develop an alternating optimization algorithm to effectively solve the nontrivial optimization problem in our HFA method. Comprehensive experiments on two benchmark datasets clearly demonstrate that HFA outperforms the existing HDA methods.

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TL;DR: A Kernel-based Conditional Independence test (KCI-test) is proposed, by constructing an appropriate test statistic and deriving its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis of conditional independence.
Abstract: Conditional independence testing is an important problem, especially in Bayesian network learning and causal discovery. Due to the curse of dimensionality, testing for conditional independence of continuous variables is particularly challenging. We propose a Kernel-based Conditional Independence test (KCI-test), by constructing an appropriate test statistic and deriving its asymptotic distribution under the null hypothesis of conditional independence. The proposed method is computationally efficient and easy to implement. Experimental results show that it outperforms other methods, especially when the conditioning set is large or the sample size is not very large, in which case other methods encounter difficulties.

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TL;DR: This work proposes a framework for multi-task learning that enables one to selectively share the information across the tasks, based on the assumption that task parameters within a group lie in a low dimensional subspace but allows the tasks in different groups to overlap with each other in one or more bases.
Abstract: In the paradigm of multi-task learning, mul- tiple related prediction tasks are learned jointly, sharing information across the tasks. We propose a framework for multi-task learn- ing that enables one to selectively share the information across the tasks. We assume that each task parameter vector is a linear combi- nation of a finite number of underlying basis tasks. The coefficients of the linear combina- tion are sparse in nature and the overlap in the sparsity patterns of two tasks controls the amount of sharing across these. Our model is based on on the assumption that task pa- rameters within a group lie in a low dimen- sional subspace but allows the tasks in differ- ent groups to overlap with each other in one or more bases. Experimental results on four datasets show that our approach outperforms competing methods.

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TL;DR: Inverse reinforcement learning (IRL) as mentioned in this paper is a probabilistic inverse optimal control algorithm that scales gracefully with task dimensionality, and is suitable for large, continuous domains where even computing a full policy is impractical.
Abstract: Inverse optimal control, also known as inverse reinforcement learning, is the problem of recovering an unknown reward function in a Markov decision process from expert demonstrations of the optimal policy. We introduce a probabilistic inverse optimal control algorithm that scales gracefully with task dimensionality, and is suitable for large, continuous domains where even computing a full policy is impractical. By using a local approximation of the reward function, our method can also drop the assumption that the demonstrations are globally optimal, requiring only local optimality. This allows it to learn from examples that are unsuitable for prior methods.

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TL;DR: Order-Based Search as discussed by the authors is a simple and easy-to-implement method for Bayesian Network (BN) learning, which is based on the well-known fact that the best network consistent with a given node ordering can be found very efficiently.
Abstract: One of the basic tasks for Bayesian networks (BNs) is that of learning a network structure from data. The BN-learning problem is NP-hard, so the standard solution is heuristic search. Many approaches have been proposed for this task, but only a very small number outperform the baseline of greedy hill-climbing with tabu lists; moreover, many of the proposed algorithms are quite complex and hard to implement. In this paper, we propose a very simple and easy-to-implement method for addressing this task. Our approach is based on the well-known fact that the best network (of bounded in-degree) consistent with a given node ordering can be found very efficiently. We therefore propose a search not over the space of structures, but over the space of orderings, selecting for each ordering the best network consistent with it. This search space is much smaller, makes more global search steps, has a lower branching factor, and avoids costly acyclicity checks. We present results for this algorithm on both synthetic and real data sets, evaluating both the score of the network found and in the running time. We show that ordering-based search outperforms the standard baseline, and is competitive with recent algorithms that are much harder to implement.

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TL;DR: It is proposed that the higher-level samples fill more uniformly the space they occupy and the high-density manifolds tend to unfold when represented at higher levels, and mixing between modes would be more efficient at higher Levels of representation.
Abstract: It has previously been hypothesized, and supported with some experimental evidence, that deeper representations, when well trained, tend to do a better job at disentangling the underlying factors of variation. We study the following related conjecture: better representations, in the sense of better disentangling, can be exploited to produce faster-mixing Markov chains. Consequently, mixing would be more efficient at higher levels of representation. To better understand why and how this is happening, we propose a secondary conjecture: the higher-level samples fill more uniformly the space they occupy and the high-density manifolds tend to unfold when represented at higher levels. The paper discusses these hypotheses and tests them experimentally through visualization and measurements of mixing and interpolating between samples.

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TL;DR: A new averaging technique for the projected stochastic subgradient method is presented, using a weighted average with a weight of t+1 for each iterate w_t at iteration t to obtain the convergence rate of O(1/t) with both an easy proof and an easy implementation.
Abstract: In this note, we present a new averaging technique for the projected stochastic subgradient method. By using a weighted average with a weight of t+1 for each iterate w_t at iteration t, we obtain the convergence rate of O(1/t) with both an easy proof and an easy implementation. The new scheme is compared empirically to existing techniques, with similar performance behavior.

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TL;DR: This paper derives an incremental, linear time and space complexity algorithm that includes eligibility traces, proves convergence under assumptions similar to previous off-policy algorithms, and empirically show better or comparable performance to existing algorithms on standard reinforcement-learning benchmark problems.
Abstract: This paper presents the first actor-critic algorithm for off-policy reinforcement learning. Our algorithm is online and incremental, and its per-time-step complexity scales linearly with the number of learned weights. Previous work on actor-critic algorithms is limited to the on-policy setting and does not take advantage of the recent advances in off-policy gradient temporal-difference learning. Off-policy techniques, such as Greedy-GQ, enable a target policy to be learned while following and obtaining data from another (behavior) policy. For many problems, however, actor-critic methods are more practical than action value methods (like Greedy-GQ) because they explicitly represent the policy; consequently, the policy can be stochastic and utilize a large action space. In this paper, we illustrate how to practically combine the generality and learning potential of off-policy learning with the flexibility in action selection given by actor-critic methods. We derive an incremental, linear time and space complexity algorithm that includes eligibility traces, prove convergence under assumptions similar to previous off-policy algorithms, and empirically show better or comparable performance to existing algorithms on standard reinforcement-learning benchmark problems.

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Daniel Hsu1, Sham M. Kakade1
TL;DR: In this paper, a simple spectral decomposition technique was used to obtain consistent parameter estimates from low-order observable moments, without additional minimum separation assumptions needed by previous computationally efficient estimation procedures.
Abstract: This work provides a computationally efficient and statistically consistent moment-based estimator for mixtures of spherical Gaussians. Under the condition that component means are in general position, a simple spectral decomposition technique yields consistent parameter estimates from low-order observable moments, without additional minimum separation assumptions needed by previous computationally efficient estimation procedures. Thus computational and information-theoretic barriers to efficient estimation in mixture models are precluded when the mixture components have means in general position and spherical covariances. Some connections are made to estimation problems related to independent component analysis.

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors studied the problem of learning kernels with the same family of kernels but with an L2 regularization instead, and for regression problems and derived the form of the solution of the optimization problem and gave an efficient iterative algorithm for computing that solution.
Abstract: The choice of the kernel is critical to the success of many learning algorithms but it is typically left to the user. Instead, the training data can be used to learn the kernel by selecting it out of a given family, such as that of non-negative linear combinations of p base kernels, constrained by a trace or L1 regularization. This paper studies the problem of learning kernels with the same family of kernels but with an L2 regularization instead, and for regression problems. We analyze the problem of learning kernels with ridge regression. We derive the form of the solution of the optimization problem and give an efficient iterative algorithm for computing that solution. We present a novel theoretical analysis of the problem based on stability and give learning bounds for orthogonal kernels that contain only an additive term O(pp/m) when compared to the standard kernel ridge regression stability bound. We also report the results of experiments indicating that L1 regularization can lead to modest improvements for a small number of kernels, but to performance degradations in larger-scale cases. In contrast, L2 regularization never degrades performance and in fact achieves significant improvements with a large number of kernels.

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TL;DR: In this paper, a general formulation of safety through ergodicity is proposed, and an efficient algorithm for guaranteed safe, but potentially suboptimal, exploration is presented, in which the constraints restrict attention to a subset of the guaranteed safe policies and the objective favors exploration policies.
Abstract: In environments with uncertain dynamics exploration is necessary to learn how to perform well. Existing reinforcement learning algorithms provide strong exploration guarantees, but they tend to rely on an ergodicity assumption. The essence of ergodicity is that any state is eventually reachable from any other state by following a suitable policy. This assumption allows for exploration algorithms that operate by simply favoring states that have rarely been visited before. For most physical systems this assumption is impractical as the systems would break before any reasonable exploration has taken place, i.e., most physical systems don't satisfy the ergodicity assumption. In this paper we address the need for safe exploration methods in Markov decision processes. We first propose a general formulation of safety through ergodicity. We show that imposing safety by restricting attention to the resulting set of guaranteed safe policies is NP-hard. We then present an efficient algorithm for guaranteed safe, but potentially suboptimal, exploration. At the core is an optimization formulation in which the constraints restrict attention to a subset of the guaranteed safe policies and the objective favors exploration policies. Our framework is compatible with the majority of previously proposed exploration methods, which rely on an exploration bonus. Our experiments, which include a Martian terrain exploration problem, show that our method is able to explore better than classical exploration methods.

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TL;DR: In this article, a generalized Fisher score was proposed to jointly select features, which maximizes the lower bound of traditional Fisher score by solving a quadratically constrained linear programming (QCLP) problem.
Abstract: Fisher score is one of the most widely used supervised feature selection methods. However, it selects each feature independently according to their scores under the Fisher criterion, which leads to a suboptimal subset of features. In this paper, we present a generalized Fisher score to jointly select features. It aims at finding an subset of features, which maximize the lower bound of traditional Fisher score. The resulting feature selection problem is a mixed integer programming, which can be reformulated as a quadratically constrained linear programming (QCLP). It is solved by cutting plane algorithm, in each iteration of which a multiple kernel learning problem is solved alternatively by multivariate ridge regression and projected gradient descent. Experiments on benchmark data sets indicate that the proposed method outperforms Fisher score as well as many other state-of-the-art feature selection methods.