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Showing papers in "arXiv.org in 2023"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article introduced LLaMA, a collection of foundation language models ranging from 7B to 65B parameters, and trained their models on trillions of tokens, and showed that it is possible to train state-of-the-art models using publicly available datasets exclusively, without resorting to proprietary and inaccessible datasets.
Abstract: We introduce LLaMA, a collection of foundation language models ranging from 7B to 65B parameters. We train our models on trillions of tokens, and show that it is possible to train state-of-the-art models using publicly available datasets exclusively, without resorting to proprietary and inaccessible datasets. In particular, LLaMA-13B outperforms GPT-3 (175B) on most benchmarks, and LLaMA-65B is competitive with the best models, Chinchilla-70B and PaLM-540B. We release all our models to the research community.

809 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: GPT-4 as mentioned in this paper is a Transformer-based model pre-trained to predict the next token in a document, which can accept image and text inputs and produce text outputs.
Abstract: We report the development of GPT-4, a large-scale, multimodal model which can accept image and text inputs and produce text outputs. While less capable than humans in many real-world scenarios, GPT-4 exhibits human-level performance on various professional and academic benchmarks, including passing a simulated bar exam with a score around the top 10% of test takers. GPT-4 is a Transformer-based model pre-trained to predict the next token in a document. The post-training alignment process results in improved performance on measures of factuality and adherence to desired behavior. A core component of this project was developing infrastructure and optimization methods that behave predictably across a wide range of scales. This allowed us to accurately predict some aspects of GPT-4's performance based on models trained with no more than 1/1,000th the compute of GPT-4.

454 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , an early version of GPT-4 was investigated, when it was still in active development by OpenAI, and it was shown that it can solve novel and difficult tasks that span mathematics, coding, vision, medicine, law, psychology and more, without requiring any special prompting.
Abstract: Artificial intelligence (AI) researchers have been developing and refining large language models (LLMs) that exhibit remarkable capabilities across a variety of domains and tasks, challenging our understanding of learning and cognition. The latest model developed by OpenAI, GPT-4, was trained using an unprecedented scale of compute and data. In this paper, we report on our investigation of an early version of GPT-4, when it was still in active development by OpenAI. We contend that (this early version of) GPT-4 is part of a new cohort of LLMs (along with ChatGPT and Google's PaLM for example) that exhibit more general intelligence than previous AI models. We discuss the rising capabilities and implications of these models. We demonstrate that, beyond its mastery of language, GPT-4 can solve novel and difficult tasks that span mathematics, coding, vision, medicine, law, psychology and more, without needing any special prompting. Moreover, in all of these tasks, GPT-4's performance is strikingly close to human-level performance, and often vastly surpasses prior models such as ChatGPT. Given the breadth and depth of GPT-4's capabilities, we believe that it could reasonably be viewed as an early (yet still incomplete) version of an artificial general intelligence (AGI) system. In our exploration of GPT-4, we put special emphasis on discovering its limitations, and we discuss the challenges ahead for advancing towards deeper and more comprehensive versions of AGI, including the possible need for pursuing a new paradigm that moves beyond next-word prediction. We conclude with reflections on societal influences of the recent technological leap and future research directions.

318 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: BLIP-2 as mentioned in this paper is a generic and efficient pre-training strategy that bootstraps vision-language pretraining from off-the-shelf frozen pre-trained image encoders and frozen large language models.
Abstract: The cost of vision-and-language pre-training has become increasingly prohibitive due to end-to-end training of large-scale models. This paper proposes BLIP-2, a generic and efficient pre-training strategy that bootstraps vision-language pre-training from off-the-shelf frozen pre-trained image encoders and frozen large language models. BLIP-2 bridges the modality gap with a lightweight Querying Transformer, which is pre-trained in two stages. The first stage bootstraps vision-language representation learning from a frozen image encoder. The second stage bootstraps vision-to-language generative learning from a frozen language model. BLIP-2 achieves state-of-the-art performance on various vision-language tasks, despite having significantly fewer trainable parameters than existing methods. For example, our model outperforms Flamingo80B by 8.7% on zero-shot VQAv2 with 54x fewer trainable parameters. We also demonstrate the model's emerging capabilities of zero-shot image-to-text generation that can follow natural language instructions.

269 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: ControlNet as discussed by the authors learns task-specific conditions in an end-to-end way, and the learning is robust even when the training dataset is small (<50k), and the model can be trained on a personal devices.
Abstract: We present a neural network structure, ControlNet, to control pretrained large diffusion models to support additional input conditions. The ControlNet learns task-specific conditions in an end-to-end way, and the learning is robust even when the training dataset is small (<50k). Moreover, training a ControlNet is as fast as fine-tuning a diffusion model, and the model can be trained on a personal devices. Alternatively, if powerful computation clusters are available, the model can scale to large amounts (millions to billions) of data. We report that large diffusion models like Stable Diffusion can be augmented with ControlNets to enable conditional inputs like edge maps, segmentation maps, keypoints, etc. This may enrich the methods to control large diffusion models and further facilitate related applications.

256 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposed a framework for quantitatively evaluating interactive LLMs such as ChatGPT using publicly available data sets, and carried out an extensive technical evaluation of chatGPT with 23 data sets covering 8 different common NLP application tasks.
Abstract: This paper proposes a framework for quantitatively evaluating interactive LLMs such as ChatGPT using publicly available data sets. We carry out an extensive technical evaluation of ChatGPT using 23 data sets covering 8 different common NLP application tasks. We evaluate the multitask, multilingual and multi-modal aspects of ChatGPT based on these data sets and a newly designed multimodal dataset. We find that ChatGPT outperforms LLMs with zero-shot learning on most tasks and even outperforms fine-tuned models on some tasks. We find that it is better at understanding non-Latin script languages than generating them. It is able to generate multimodal content from textual prompts, via an intermediate code generation step. Moreover, we find that ChatGPT is 63.41% accurate on average in 10 different reasoning categories under logical reasoning, non-textual reasoning, and commonsense reasoning, hence making it an unreliable reasoner. It is, for example, better at deductive than inductive reasoning. ChatGPT suffers from hallucination problems like other LLMs and it generates more extrinsic hallucinations from its parametric memory as it does not have access to an external knowledge base. Finally, the interactive feature of ChatGPT enables human collaboration with the underlying LLM to improve its performance, i.e, 8% ROUGE-1 on summarization and 2% ChrF++ on machine translation, in a multi-turn"prompt engineering"fashion. We also release codebase for evaluation set extraction.

197 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Toolformer as discussed by the authors is a model trained to decide which APIs to call, when to call them, what arguments to pass, and how to best incorporate the results into future token prediction.
Abstract: Language models (LMs) exhibit remarkable abilities to solve new tasks from just a few examples or textual instructions, especially at scale. They also, paradoxically, struggle with basic functionality, such as arithmetic or factual lookup, where much simpler and smaller models excel. In this paper, we show that LMs can teach themselves to use external tools via simple APIs and achieve the best of both worlds. We introduce Toolformer, a model trained to decide which APIs to call, when to call them, what arguments to pass, and how to best incorporate the results into future token prediction. This is done in a self-supervised way, requiring nothing more than a handful of demonstrations for each API. We incorporate a range of tools, including a calculator, a Q\&A system, two different search engines, a translation system, and a calendar. Toolformer achieves substantially improved zero-shot performance across a variety of downstream tasks, often competitive with much larger models, without sacrificing its core language modeling abilities.

162 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , an embodied language model is proposed to directly incorporate real-world continuous sensor modalities into language models and establish the link between words and percepts for embodied reasoning tasks, including sequential robotic manipulation planning, visual question answering, and captioning.
Abstract: Large language models excel at a wide range of complex tasks. However, enabling general inference in the real world, e.g., for robotics problems, raises the challenge of grounding. We propose embodied language models to directly incorporate real-world continuous sensor modalities into language models and thereby establish the link between words and percepts. Input to our embodied language model are multi-modal sentences that interleave visual, continuous state estimation, and textual input encodings. We train these encodings end-to-end, in conjunction with a pre-trained large language model, for multiple embodied tasks including sequential robotic manipulation planning, visual question answering, and captioning. Our evaluations show that PaLM-E, a single large embodied multimodal model, can address a variety of embodied reasoning tasks, from a variety of observation modalities, on multiple embodiments, and further, exhibits positive transfer: the model benefits from diverse joint training across internet-scale language, vision, and visual-language domains. Our largest model, PaLM-E-562B with 562B parameters, in addition to being trained on robotics tasks, is a visual-language generalist with state-of-the-art performance on OK-VQA, and retains generalist language capabilities with increasing scale.

150 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Recently, a large language model (LLM) as mentioned in this paper has been proposed by pre-training Transformer models over large-scale corpora, showing strong capabilities in solving various NLP tasks.
Abstract: Language is essentially a complex, intricate system of human expressions governed by grammatical rules. It poses a significant challenge to develop capable AI algorithms for comprehending and grasping a language. As a major approach, language modeling has been widely studied for language understanding and generation in the past two decades, evolving from statistical language models to neural language models. Recently, pre-trained language models (PLMs) have been proposed by pre-training Transformer models over large-scale corpora, showing strong capabilities in solving various NLP tasks. Since researchers have found that model scaling can lead to performance improvement, they further study the scaling effect by increasing the model size to an even larger size. Interestingly, when the parameter scale exceeds a certain level, these enlarged language models not only achieve a significant performance improvement but also show some special abilities that are not present in small-scale language models. To discriminate the difference in parameter scale, the research community has coined the term large language models (LLM) for the PLMs of significant size. Recently, the research on LLMs has been largely advanced by both academia and industry, and a remarkable progress is the launch of ChatGPT, which has attracted widespread attention from society. The technical evolution of LLMs has been making an important impact on the entire AI community, which would revolutionize the way how we develop and use AI algorithms. In this survey, we review the recent advances of LLMs by introducing the background, key findings, and mainstream techniques. In particular, we focus on four major aspects of LLMs, namely pre-training, adaptation tuning, utilization, and capacity evaluation. Besides, we also summarize the available resources for developing LLMs and discuss the remaining issues for future directions.

149 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors empirically analyzed the zero-shot learning ability of ChatGPT by evaluating it on 20 popular NLP datasets covering 7 representative task categories and found that it performs well on many tasks favoring reasoning capabilities (e.g., arithmetic reasoning).
Abstract: Spurred by advancements in scale, large language models (LLMs) have demonstrated the ability to perform a variety of natural language processing (NLP) tasks zero-shot -- i.e., without adaptation on downstream data. Recently, the debut of ChatGPT has drawn a great deal of attention from the natural language processing (NLP) community due to the fact that it can generate high-quality responses to human input and self-correct previous mistakes based on subsequent conversations. However, it is not yet known whether ChatGPT can serve as a generalist model that can perform many NLP tasks zero-shot. In this work, we empirically analyze the zero-shot learning ability of ChatGPT by evaluating it on 20 popular NLP datasets covering 7 representative task categories. With extensive empirical studies, we demonstrate both the effectiveness and limitations of the current version of ChatGPT. We find that ChatGPT performs well on many tasks favoring reasoning capabilities (e.g., arithmetic reasoning) while it still faces challenges when solving specific tasks such as sequence tagging. We additionally provide in-depth analysis through qualitative case studies.

140 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Segment Anything (SA) dataset as mentioned in this paper is the largest dataset for image segmentation, with over 1 billion masks on 11M licensed and privacy-preserving images and is designed and trained to be promptable, so it can transfer zero-shot to new image distributions and tasks.
Abstract: We introduce the Segment Anything (SA) project: a new task, model, and dataset for image segmentation. Using our efficient model in a data collection loop, we built the largest segmentation dataset to date (by far), with over 1 billion masks on 11M licensed and privacy respecting images. The model is designed and trained to be promptable, so it can transfer zero-shot to new image distributions and tasks. We evaluate its capabilities on numerous tasks and find that its zero-shot performance is impressive -- often competitive with or even superior to prior fully supervised results. We are releasing the Segment Anything Model (SAM) and corresponding dataset (SA-1B) of 1B masks and 11M images at https://segment-anything.com to foster research into foundation models for computer vision.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a framework that leverages large language models (LLMs) to manage existing AI models to solve complicated AI tasks and language could be a generic interface to empower this is presented.
Abstract: Solving complicated AI tasks with different domains and modalities is a key step toward artificial general intelligence. While there are abundant AI models available for different domains and modalities, they cannot handle complicated AI tasks. Considering large language models (LLMs) have exhibited exceptional ability in language understanding, generation, interaction, and reasoning, we advocate that LLMs could act as a controller to manage existing AI models to solve complicated AI tasks and language could be a generic interface to empower this. Based on this philosophy, we present HuggingGPT, a framework that leverages LLMs (e.g., ChatGPT) to connect various AI models in machine learning communities (e.g., Hugging Face) to solve AI tasks. Specifically, we use ChatGPT to conduct task planning when receiving a user request, select models according to their function descriptions available in Hugging Face, execute each subtask with the selected AI model, and summarize the response according to the execution results. By leveraging the strong language capability of ChatGPT and abundant AI models in Hugging Face, HuggingGPT is able to cover numerous sophisticated AI tasks in different modalities and domains and achieve impressive results in language, vision, speech, and other challenging tasks, which paves a new way towards artificial general intelligence.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a system called Visual ChatGPT, incorporating different visual foundation models, is proposed to enable the user to interact with Chat-GPT by sending and receiving not only languages but also images and providing complex visual questions or visual editing instructions.
Abstract: ChatGPT is attracting a cross-field interest as it provides a language interface with remarkable conversational competency and reasoning capabilities across many domains. However, since ChatGPT is trained with languages, it is currently not capable of processing or generating images from the visual world. At the same time, Visual Foundation Models, such as Visual Transformers or Stable Diffusion, although showing great visual understanding and generation capabilities, they are only experts on specific tasks with one-round fixed inputs and outputs. To this end, We build a system called \textbf{Visual ChatGPT}, incorporating different Visual Foundation Models, to enable the user to interact with ChatGPT by 1) sending and receiving not only languages but also images 2) providing complex visual questions or visual editing instructions that require the collaboration of multiple AI models with multi-steps. 3) providing feedback and asking for corrected results. We design a series of prompts to inject the visual model information into ChatGPT, considering models of multiple inputs/outputs and models that require visual feedback. Experiments show that Visual ChatGPT opens the door to investigating the visual roles of ChatGPT with the help of Visual Foundation Models. Our system is publicly available at \url{https://github.com/microsoft/visual-chatgpt}.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This introduction to arithmetic coding is divided in two parts; the first explains how and why arithmetic coding works, and the second shows some of its basic properties, which are later used in the computational techniques required for a practical implementation.
Abstract: entropy coding, compression, complexity This introduction to arithmetic coding is divided in two parts. The first explains how and why arithmetic coding works. We start presenting it in very general terms, so that its simplicity is not lost under layers of implementation details. Next, we show some of its basic properties, which are later used in the computational techniques required for a practical implementation.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Muse as discussed by the authors is a text-to-image Transformer model that achieves state-of-the-art image generation performance while being significantly more efficient than diffusion or autoregressive models.
Abstract: We present Muse, a text-to-image Transformer model that achieves state-of-the-art image generation performance while being significantly more efficient than diffusion or autoregressive models. Muse is trained on a masked modeling task in discrete token space: given the text embedding extracted from a pre-trained large language model (LLM), Muse is trained to predict randomly masked image tokens. Compared to pixel-space diffusion models, such as Imagen and DALL-E 2, Muse is significantly more efficient due to the use of discrete tokens and requiring fewer sampling iterations; compared to autoregressive models, such as Parti, Muse is more efficient due to the use of parallel decoding. The use of a pre-trained LLM enables fine-grained language understanding, translating to high-fidelity image generation and the understanding of visual concepts such as objects, their spatial relationships, pose, cardinality etc. Our 900M parameter model achieves a new SOTA on CC3M, with an FID score of 6.06. The Muse 3B parameter model achieves an FID of 7.88 on zero-shot COCO evaluation, along with a CLIP score of 0.32. Muse also directly enables a number of image editing applications without the need to fine-tune or invert the model: inpainting, outpainting, and mask-free editing. More results are available at https://muse-model.github.io

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors aligns a frozen visual encoder with a frozen large language model (LLM) using just one projection layer, which is called MiniGPT-4, to generate websites from handwritten text and identify humorous elements within images.
Abstract: The recent GPT-4 has demonstrated extraordinary multi-modal abilities, such as directly generating websites from handwritten text and identifying humorous elements within images. These features are rarely observed in previous vision-language models. We believe the primary reason for GPT-4's advanced multi-modal generation capabilities lies in the utilization of a more advanced large language model (LLM). To examine this phenomenon, we present MiniGPT-4, which aligns a frozen visual encoder with a frozen LLM, Vicuna, using just one projection layer. Our findings reveal that MiniGPT-4 possesses many capabilities similar to those exhibited by GPT-4 like detailed image description generation and website creation from hand-written drafts. Furthermore, we also observe other emerging capabilities in MiniGPT-4, including writing stories and poems inspired by given images, providing solutions to problems shown in images, teaching users how to cook based on food photos, etc. In our experiment, we found that only performing the pretraining on raw image-text pairs could produce unnatural language outputs that lack coherency including repetition and fragmented sentences. To address this problem, we curate a high-quality, well-aligned dataset in the second stage to finetune our model using a conversational template. This step proved crucial for augmenting the model's generation reliability and overall usability. Notably, our model is highly computationally efficient, as we only train a projection layer utilizing approximately 5 million aligned image-text pairs. Our code, pre-trained model, and collected dataset are available at https://minigpt-4.github.io/.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors show that diffusion models memorize individual images from their training data and emit them at generation time, and that mitigating these vulnerabilities may require new advances in privacy-preserving training.
Abstract: Image diffusion models such as DALL-E 2, Imagen, and Stable Diffusion have attracted significant attention due to their ability to generate high-quality synthetic images. In this work, we show that diffusion models memorize individual images from their training data and emit them at generation time. With a generate-and-filter pipeline, we extract over a thousand training examples from state-of-the-art models, ranging from photographs of individual people to trademarked company logos. We also train hundreds of diffusion models in various settings to analyze how different modeling and data decisions affect privacy. Overall, our results show that diffusion models are much less private than prior generative models such as GANs, and that mitigating these vulnerabilities may require new advances in privacy-preserving training.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors present a comprehensive analysis of ChatGPT's failures, including reasoning, factual errors, math, coding, and bias, and highlight the risks, limitations, and societal implications of chatGPT.
Abstract: Large language models have been demonstrated to be valuable in different fields. ChatGPT, developed by OpenAI, has been trained using massive amounts of data and simulates human conversation by comprehending context and generating appropriate responses. It has garnered significant attention due to its ability to effectively answer a broad range of human inquiries, with fluent and comprehensive answers surpassing prior public chatbots in both security and usefulness. However, a comprehensive analysis of ChatGPT's failures is lacking, which is the focus of this study. Eleven categories of failures, including reasoning, factual errors, math, coding, and bias, are presented and discussed. The risks, limitations, and societal implications of ChatGPT are also highlighted. The goal of this study is to assist researchers and developers in enhancing future language models and chatbots.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors collected tens of thousands of comparison responses from both human experts and ChatGPT, with questions ranging from open-domain, financial, medical, legal, and psychological areas.
Abstract: The introduction of ChatGPT has garnered widespread attention in both academic and industrial communities. ChatGPT is able to respond effectively to a wide range of human questions, providing fluent and comprehensive answers that significantly surpass previous public chatbots in terms of security and usefulness. On one hand, people are curious about how ChatGPT is able to achieve such strength and how far it is from human experts. On the other hand, people are starting to worry about the potential negative impacts that large language models (LLMs) like ChatGPT could have on society, such as fake news, plagiarism, and social security issues. In this work, we collected tens of thousands of comparison responses from both human experts and ChatGPT, with questions ranging from open-domain, financial, medical, legal, and psychological areas. We call the collected dataset the Human ChatGPT Comparison Corpus (HC3). Based on the HC3 dataset, we study the characteristics of ChatGPT's responses, the differences and gaps from human experts, and future directions for LLMs. We conducted comprehensive human evaluations and linguistic analyses of ChatGPT-generated content compared with that of humans, where many interesting results are revealed. After that, we conduct extensive experiments on how to effectively detect whether a certain text is generated by ChatGPT or humans. We build three different detection systems, explore several key factors that influence their effectiveness, and evaluate them in different scenarios. The dataset, code, and models are all publicly available at https://github.com/Hello-SimpleAI/chatgpt-comparison-detection.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposed a multimodal large language model (MLLM) that can perceive general modalities, learn in context (i.e., few-shot), and follow instructions (e.g., zero-shot).
Abstract: A big convergence of language, multimodal perception, action, and world modeling is a key step toward artificial general intelligence. In this work, we introduce Kosmos-1, a Multimodal Large Language Model (MLLM) that can perceive general modalities, learn in context (i.e., few-shot), and follow instructions (i.e., zero-shot). Specifically, we train Kosmos-1 from scratch on web-scale multimodal corpora, including arbitrarily interleaved text and images, image-caption pairs, and text data. We evaluate various settings, including zero-shot, few-shot, and multimodal chain-of-thought prompting, on a wide range of tasks without any gradient updates or finetuning. Experimental results show that Kosmos-1 achieves impressive performance on (i) language understanding, generation, and even OCR-free NLP (directly fed with document images), (ii) perception-language tasks, including multimodal dialogue, image captioning, visual question answering, and (iii) vision tasks, such as image recognition with descriptions (specifying classification via text instructions). We also show that MLLMs can benefit from cross-modal transfer, i.e., transfer knowledge from language to multimodal, and from multimodal to language. In addition, we introduce a dataset of Raven IQ test, which diagnoses the nonverbal reasoning capability of MLLMs.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: ChatGPT as mentioned in this paper uses pivot prompting to translate the source sentence into a high-resource pivot language before into the target language, which improves the translation performance significantly.
Abstract: This report provides a preliminary evaluation of ChatGPT for machine translation, including translation prompt, multilingual translation, and translation robustness. We adopt the prompts advised by ChatGPT to trigger its translation ability and find that the candidate prompts generally work well and show minor performance differences. By evaluating on a number of benchmark test sets 1 , we find that ChatGPT performs competitively with commercial translation products (e.g., Google Translate) on high-resource European languages but lags behind significantly on low-resource or distant languages. For distant languages, we explore an interesting strategy named pivot prompting that asks ChatGPT to translate the source sentence into a high-resource pivot language before into the target language, which improves the translation performance significantly. As for the translation robustness, ChatGPT does not perform as well as the commercial systems on biomedical abstracts or Reddit comments but is potentially a good translator for spoken language.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: LLaVA as mentioned in this paper is an end-to-end trained large multimodal model that connects a vision encoder and a large language model for general-purpose visual and language understanding.
Abstract: Instruction tuning large language models (LLMs) using machine-generated instruction-following data has improved zero-shot capabilities on new tasks, but the idea is less explored in the multimodal field. In this paper, we present the first attempt to use language-only GPT-4 to generate multimodal language-image instruction-following data. By instruction tuning on such generated data, we introduce LLaVA: Large Language and Vision Assistant, an end-to-end trained large multimodal model that connects a vision encoder and LLM for general-purpose visual and language understanding.Our early experiments show that LLaVA demonstrates impressive multimodel chat abilities, sometimes exhibiting the behaviors of multimodal GPT-4 on unseen images/instructions, and yields a 85.1% relative score compared with GPT-4 on a synthetic multimodal instruction-following dataset. When fine-tuned on Science QA, the synergy of LLaVA and GPT-4 achieves a new state-of-the-art accuracy of 92.53%. We make GPT-4 generated visual instruction tuning data, our model and code base publicly available.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article presented a comprehensive evaluation of GPT-4, a general-purpose model that is not specialized for medical problems through training or engineered to solve clinical tasks, on medical competency examinations and benchmark datasets.
Abstract: Large language models (LLMs) have demonstrated remarkable capabilities in natural language understanding and generation across various domains, including medicine. We present a comprehensive evaluation of GPT-4, a state-of-the-art LLM, on medical competency examinations and benchmark datasets. GPT-4 is a general-purpose model that is not specialized for medical problems through training or engineered to solve clinical tasks. Our analysis covers two sets of official practice materials for the USMLE, a three-step examination program used to assess clinical competency and grant licensure in the United States. We also evaluate performance on the MultiMedQA suite of benchmark datasets. Beyond measuring model performance, experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of test questions containing both text and images on model performance, probe for memorization of content during training, and study probability calibration, which is of critical importance in high-stakes applications like medicine. Our results show that GPT-4, without any specialized prompt crafting, exceeds the passing score on USMLE by over 20 points and outperforms earlier general-purpose models (GPT-3.5) as well as models specifically fine-tuned on medical knowledge (Med-PaLM, a prompt-tuned version of Flan-PaLM 540B). In addition, GPT-4 is significantly better calibrated than GPT-3.5, demonstrating a much-improved ability to predict the likelihood that its answers are correct. We also explore the behavior of the model qualitatively through a case study that shows the ability of GPT-4 to explain medical reasoning, personalize explanations to students, and interactively craft new counterfactual scenarios around a medical case. Implications of the findings are discussed for potential uses of GPT-4 in medical education, assessment, and clinical practice, with appropriate attention to challenges of accuracy and safety.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposed augmented language models (ALMs), which can learn to reason, use tools, and even act, while still performing standard natural language tasks and even outperforming most regular LMs on several benchmarks.
Abstract: This survey reviews works in which language models (LMs) are augmented with reasoning skills and the ability to use tools. The former is defined as decomposing a potentially complex task into simpler subtasks while the latter consists in calling external modules such as a code interpreter. LMs can leverage these augmentations separately or in combination via heuristics, or learn to do so from demonstrations. While adhering to a standard missing tokens prediction objective, such augmented LMs can use various, possibly non-parametric external modules to expand their context processing ability, thus departing from the pure language modeling paradigm. We therefore refer to them as Augmented Language Models (ALMs). The missing token objective allows ALMs to learn to reason, use tools, and even act, while still performing standard natural language tasks and even outperforming most regular LMs on several benchmarks. In this work, after reviewing current advance in ALMs, we conclude that this new research direction has the potential to address common limitations of traditional LMs such as interpretability, consistency, and scalability issues.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors used GPT-4 to generate instruction-following data for LLM finetuning, which led to superior zero-shot performance on new tasks compared to previous state-of-the-art models.
Abstract: Prior work has shown that finetuning large language models (LLMs) using machine-generated instruction-following data enables such models to achieve remarkable zero-shot capabilities on new tasks, and no human-written instructions are needed. In this paper, we present the first attempt to use GPT-4 to generate instruction-following data for LLM finetuning. Our early experiments on instruction-tuned LLaMA models show that the 52K English and Chinese instruction-following data generated by GPT-4 leads to superior zero-shot performance on new tasks to the instruction-following data generated by previous state-of-the-art models. We also collect feedback and comparison data from GPT-4 to enable a comprehensive evaluation and reward model training. We make our data generated using GPT-4 as well as our codebase publicly available.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In contrast to formal mathematics, where large databases of formal proofs are available (e.g., the Lean Mathematical Library), current datasets of natural language mathematics, used to benchmark language models, either cover only elementary mathematics or are very small as discussed by the authors .
Abstract: We investigate the mathematical capabilities of two iterations of ChatGPT (released 9-January-2023 and 30-January-2023) and of GPT-4 by testing them on publicly available datasets, as well as hand-crafted ones, using a novel methodology. In contrast to formal mathematics, where large databases of formal proofs are available (e.g., the Lean Mathematical Library), current datasets of natural-language mathematics, used to benchmark language models, either cover only elementary mathematics or are very small. We address this by publicly releasing two new datasets: GHOSTS and miniGHOSTS. These are the first natural-language datasets curated by working researchers in mathematics that (1) aim to cover graduate-level mathematics, (2) provide a holistic overview of the mathematical capabilities of language models, and (3) distinguish multiple dimensions of mathematical reasoning. These datasets also test whether ChatGPT and GPT-4 can be helpful assistants to professional mathematicians by emulating use cases that arise in the daily professional activities of mathematicians. We benchmark the models on a range of fine-grained performance metrics. For advanced mathematics, this is the most detailed evaluation effort to date. We find that ChatGPT can be used most successfully as a mathematical assistant for querying facts, acting as a mathematical search engine and knowledge base interface. GPT-4 can additionally be used for undergraduate-level mathematics but fails on graduate-level difficulty. Contrary to many positive reports in the media about GPT-4 and ChatGPT's exam-solving abilities (a potential case of selection bias), their overall mathematical performance is well below the level of a graduate student. Hence, if your goal is to use ChatGPT to pass a graduate-level math exam, you would be better off copying from your average peer!

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Pretrained Foundation Models (PFMs) as mentioned in this paper are regarded as the foundation for various downstream tasks with different data modalities, such as text, image, graph, as well as other data modality.
Abstract: Pretrained Foundation Models (PFMs) are regarded as the foundation for various downstream tasks with different data modalities. A PFM (e.g., BERT, ChatGPT, and GPT-4) is trained on large-scale data which provides a reasonable parameter initialization for a wide range of downstream applications. BERT learns bidirectional encoder representations from Transformers, which are trained on large datasets as contextual language models. Similarly, the generative pretrained transformer (GPT) method employs Transformers as the feature extractor and is trained using an autoregressive paradigm on large datasets. Recently, ChatGPT shows promising success on large language models, which applies an autoregressive language model with zero shot or few shot prompting. The remarkable achievements of PFM have brought significant breakthroughs to various fields of AI. Numerous studies have proposed different methods, raising the demand for an updated survey. This study provides a comprehensive review of recent research advancements, challenges, and opportunities for PFMs in text, image, graph, as well as other data modalities. The review covers the basic components and existing pretraining methods used in natural language processing, computer vision, and graph learning. Additionally, it explores advanced PFMs used for different data modalities and unified PFMs that consider data quality and quantity. The review also discusses research related to the fundamentals of PFMs, such as model efficiency and compression, security, and privacy. Finally, the study provides key implications, future research directions, challenges, and open problems in the field of PFMs. Overall, this survey aims to shed light on the research of the PFMs on scalability, security, logical reasoning ability, cross-domain learning ability, and the user-friendly interactive ability for artificial general intelligence.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article showed that ChatGPT outperforms crowd workers for several annotation tasks, including relevance, stance, topics, and frame detection, and demonstrated the potential of large language models to drastically increase the efficiency of text classification.
Abstract: Many NLP applications require manual text annotations for a variety of tasks, notably to train classifiers or evaluate the performance of unsupervised models. Depending on the size and degree of complexity, the tasks may be conducted by crowd workers on platforms such as MTurk as well as trained annotators, such as research assistants. Using four samples of tweets and news articles (n = 6,183), we show that ChatGPT outperforms crowd workers for several annotation tasks, including relevance, stance, topics, and frame detection. Across the four datasets, the zero-shot accuracy of ChatGPT exceeds that of crowd workers by about 25 percentage points on average, while ChatGPT's intercoder agreement exceeds that of both crowd workers and trained annotators for all tasks. Moreover, the per-annotation cost of ChatGPT is less than $0.003-about thirty times cheaper than MTurk. These results demonstrate the potential of large language models to drastically increase the efficiency of text classification.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, Chen et al. as discussed by the authors proposed a 22B-parameter language model for image and video modeling, which achieved state-of-the-art performance on a wide variety of downstream tasks.
Abstract: The scaling of Transformers has driven breakthrough capabilities for language models. At present, the largest large language models (LLMs) contain upwards of 100B parameters. Vision Transformers (ViT) have introduced the same architecture to image and video modelling, but these have not yet been successfully scaled to nearly the same degree; the largest dense ViT contains 4B parameters (Chen et al., 2022). We present a recipe for highly efficient and stable training of a 22B-parameter ViT (ViT-22B) and perform a wide variety of experiments on the resulting model. When evaluated on downstream tasks (often with a lightweight linear model on frozen features), ViT-22B demonstrates increasing performance with scale. We further observe other interesting benefits of scale, including an improved tradeoff between fairness and performance, state-of-the-art alignment to human visual perception in terms of shape/texture bias, and improved robustness. ViT-22B demonstrates the potential for"LLM-like"scaling in vision, and provides key steps towards getting there.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Zhang et al. as discussed by the authors propose to learn simple and lightweight adapters to align internal knowledge in T2I models with external control signals, while freezing the original large-scale text-to-image models.
Abstract: The incredible generative ability of large-scale text-to-image (T2I) models has demonstrated strong power of learning complex structures and meaningful semantics. However, relying solely on text prompts cannot fully take advantage of the knowledge learned by the model, especially when flexible and accurate controlling (e.g., color and structure) is needed. In this paper, we aim to ``dig out"the capabilities that T2I models have implicitly learned, and then explicitly use them to control the generation more granularly. Specifically, we propose to learn simple and lightweight T2I-Adapters to align internal knowledge in T2I models with external control signals, while freezing the original large T2I models. In this way, we can train various adapters according to different conditions, achieving rich control and editing effects in the color and structure of the generation results. Further, the proposed T2I-Adapters have attractive properties of practical value, such as composability and generalization ability. Extensive experiments demonstrate that our T2I-Adapter has promising generation quality and a wide range of applications.