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JournalISSN: 0007-3725

Buildings 

Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
About: Buildings is an academic journal published by Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Efficient energy use & Masonry. It has an ISSN identifier of 0007-3725. Over the lifetime, 1767 publications have been published receiving 24627 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a conceptual framework aimed at implementing sustainability principles in the building industry is presented, which includes resource conservation, cost efficiency and design for human adaptation, based on the sustainable triple bottom line principle.
Abstract: This paper presents a conceptual framework aimed at implementing sustainability principles in the building industry. The proposed framework based on the sustainable triple bottom line principle, includes resource conservation, cost efficiency and design for human adaptation. Following a thorough literature review, each principle involving strategies and methods to be applied during the life cycle of building projects is explained and a few case studies are presented for clarity on the methods. The framework will allow design teams to have an appropriate balance between economic, social and environmental issues, changing the way construction practitioners think about the information they use when assessing building projects, thereby facilitating the sustainability of building industry.

370 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the emerging need for vertical farms by examining issues related to food security, urban population growth, farmland shortages, food miles, and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
Abstract: This paper discusses the emerging need for vertical farms by examining issues related to food security, urban population growth, farmland shortages, “food miles”, and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Urban planners and agricultural leaders have argued that cities will need to produce food internally to respond to demand by increasing population and to avoid paralyzing congestion, harmful pollution, and unaffordable food prices. The paper examines urban agriculture as a solution to these problems by merging food production and consumption in one place, with the vertical farm being suitable for urban areas where available land is limited and expensive. Luckily, recent advances in greenhouse technologies such as hydroponics, aeroponics, and aquaponics have provided a promising future to the vertical farm concept. These high-tech systems represent a paradigm shift in farming and food production and offer suitable and efficient methods for city farming by minimizing maintenance and maximizing yield. Upon reviewing these technologies and examining project prototypes, we find that these efforts may plant the seeds for the realization of the vertical farm. The paper, however, closes by speculating about the consequences, advantages, and disadvantages of the vertical farm’s implementation. Economic feasibility, codes, regulations, and a lack of expertise remain major obstacles in the path to implementing the vertical farm.

220 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors quantify and compare the environmental impacts associated with alternative designs for a typical North American mid-rise office building, and find that the laminated timber building design offered a lower environmental impact in 10 of 11 assessment categories.
Abstract: The objective of this project was to quantify and compare the environmental impacts associated with alternative designs for a typical North American mid-rise office building. Two scenarios were considered; a traditional cast-in-place, reinforced concrete frame and a laminated timber hybrid design, which utilized engineered wood products (cross-laminated timber (CLT) and glulam). The boundary of the quantitative analysis was cradle-to-construction site gate and encompassed the structural support system and the building enclosure. Floor plans, elevations, material quantities, and structural loads associated with a five-storey concrete-framed building design were obtained from issued-for-construction drawings. A functionally equivalent, laminated timber hybrid design was conceived, based on Canadian Building Code requirements. Design values for locally produced CLT panels were established from in-house material testing. Primary data collected from a pilot-scale manufacturing facility was used to develop the life cycle inventory for CLT, whereas secondary sources were referenced for other construction materials. The TRACI characterization methodology was employed to translate inventory flows into impact indicators. The results indicated that the laminated timber building design offered a lower environmental impact in 10 of 11 assessment categories. The cradle-to-gate process energy was found to be nearly identical in both design scenarios (3.5 GJ/m2), whereas the cumulative embodied energy (feedstock plus process) of construction materials was estimated to be 8.2 and 4.6 GJ/m2 for the timber and concrete designs, respectively; which indicated an increased availability of readily accessible potential energy stored within the building materials of the timber alternative.

174 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The seismic performance assessment of buildings is a challenging process as mentioned in this paper, and the seismic performance of buildings can be classified into three categories: seismic performance, seismic performance and seismic performance degradation.
Abstract: The seismic performance assessment of buildings is a challenging process [...]

169 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Seismic isolation is a technique that has been used around the world to protect building structures, nonstructural components and content from the damaging effects of earthquake ground shaking as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Seismic isolation is a technique that has been used around the world to protect building structures, nonstructural components and content from the damaging effects of earthquake ground shaking. This paper summarizes current practices, describes widely used seismic isolation hardware, chronicles the history and development of modern seismic isolation through shake table testing of isolated buildings, and reviews past efforts to achieve three-dimensional seismic isolation. The review of current practices and past research are synthesized with recent developments from full-scale shake table testing to highlight areas where research is needed to achieve full seismic damage protection of buildings. The emphasis of this paper is on the application of passive seismic isolation for buildings primarily as practiced in the United States, though systems used in other countries will be discussed.

161 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
2023116
202226
2021569
2020259
2019245
2018187