scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Showing papers in "College Art Journal in 1955"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There are in this country over 30,000,000 camera operators but only a handful of outstanding photographers as discussed by the authors, which is an indication that, despite the more or less automatic character of its technique or techniques, the art of photography is a difficult one.
Abstract: There are in this country over 30,000,000 camera operators but only a handful of outstanding photographers. This is an indication that, despite the more or less automatic character of its technique or techniques, the art of photography is a difficult one.The making of a photograph depends in the first instance on an act of selection—the photographer chooses some particular configuration of things in the world round-about and records it. This is the characteristic method of working, even though photographers frequently do create their own compositions by deliberately arranging the objects, colors and lighting which constitute the subject material of their pictures. The photographer, typically, is far more dependent upon existing visual phenomena of the external world than the painter. When the latter draws upon these visual phenomena he is free to change them in any way which suits him in order to heighten their effect and he very often does, in fact, alter the forms, colors, and arrangement of the things ...

36 citations


Journal ArticleDOI

24 citations


Journal ArticleDOI

11 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A major portion of critical space is devoted to the exponents of this development, celebrated as the logical and primary focus of the art of the immediate present as discussed by the authors, and this dominance is apparent in exhibitions and critical literature, particularly in the reportorial journals, Art Digest and Art News.
Abstract: Contemporary American and European painting has been increasingly identified as abstract expressionist in character. This dominance is apparent in exhibitions and critical literature, particularly in the reportorial journals, Art Digest and Art News, which attempt to document the art of our times. A major portion of critical space is devoted to the exponents of this development, celebrated as the logical and primary focus of the art of the immediate present.

8 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Among the lesser of the revolutionary events of the first two decades of the present century was the emergence and propagation of a new style of architecture as discussed by the authors, which was called architectural revolution.
Abstract: Among the lesser of the revolutionary events of the first two decades of the present century was the emergence and propagation of a new style of architecture. Like most cultural revolutions, or seg...

4 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Brodel Lecture as discussed by the authors explores the relationship between the graphic arts and the field of applied technology, which is one of the several foundations upon which the artist constructs his visions of harmony.
Abstract: When your Committee did me the honor of inviting me to give the Brodel Lecture it occurred to me that a suitable topic for discussion would be one that lay somehow at the joint boundary between your field and my own. Neither you nor I can claim full expertness at that boundary, but, perhaps together we can discover some logical structure, some intriguing vistas. The slow growth of scientific knowledge regarding space perception has in the past exerted profound influence upon the graphic arts, and artists have from time to time contributed both to the science and to the problems which the science has been required to elucidate. From the viewpoint of visual science the application of its discoveries in the plastic arts represents a field of applied technology. To the artist this technology is one of the several foundations upon which he constructs his visions of harmony. I believe that it is singularly appropriate to associate an inquiry into this technologic fundament of the graphic arts with the name of m...

3 citations






Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: When the war was over, and our men slowly wandered home from the prison camps, it was natural that every prediction about the future of German painting should end in uncertainty as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: When the war was over and our men slowly wandered home from the prison camps, it was natural that every prediction about the future of German painting should end in uncertainty. The basic intellectual structure of the nation had been demolished. As far as art was concerned, the clearcut consistency that had characterized the development of German painting since the turn of the century had been brutally interrupted and the harmonious interplay with the art of other European countries had been destroyed. The German painter was completely isolated; the masters who might have given new morale to the new painters were no longer alive. Klee had died at Locarno in 1940, Kandinsky at Neuilly-sur-Seine in 1944. The greatest painter of the “Brucke” group had shot himself at Davos in 1938. With the passing of Klee, Kandinsky, and Kirchner, the pillars on which a new art might have been organized were shattered.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: If the college art teaching field keeps pace with the prospective growth in enrollments in institutions of higher learning in this country during the coming fifteen years, the indications are that the 3300 in the field in 1952 will have grown to 4000 by 1960, to about 5400 by 1965, and to somewhere between 6300 and 7000 by 1970.
Abstract: If the college art teaching field keeps pace with the prospective growth in enrollments in institutions of higher learning in this country during the coming fifteen years, the indications are that the 3300 in the field in 1952 will have grown to 4000 by 1960, to about 5400 by 1965, and to somewhere between 6300 and 7000 by 1970.1 To these increases must be added the number of teachers who die or retire every year, and the number of those who must be replaced because they leave the profession for other reasons. For those who are interested in the method of calculating annual requirements, an explanatory note is included at the end of this article.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Man is a sensitive, questioning creature, aware of the slightest changes of temperature, color, taste, texture, sound and odour as mentioned in this paper and can react with awe, arrogance, fear, pleasure, ecstasy, revulsion, or a multitude of other ways, depending on his nature, prior conditioning, etc.
Abstract: Man is a sensitive, questioning creature. His body is aware of the slightest changes of temperature, color, taste, texture, sound and odor. His experiences in these areas can stir in him waves of feeling and intuition, causing him to react with awe, arrogance, fear, pleasure, ecstasy, revulsion, or a multitude of other ways, depending on his nature, prior conditioning, etc.



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The belief that the art historian and the studio artist are two contrary forces, by some accident thrown into the same academic department, appears even in small art departments where staff members may be required to teach in both history and practice areas.
Abstract: The studio artists and the art historians on the faculties of American colleges and universities have a great opportunity to supplement each other's accomplishments. Is this opportunity used, or even fully realized ? Too often the belief prevails that the art historian and the studio artist are two contrary forces, by some accident thrown into the same academic department. This idea appears even in small art departments where staff members may be required to teach in both history and practice areas. The feeling of separation is freely displayed in the annual College Art Association meetings. The historians attend sessions on Hellenic, Renaissance and Baroque art while the studio artists have concurrent panels on “Creative Art” and “The Artist- Teacher.” To be sure each person should follow his specialty and interest, but how much actual and enthusiastic crossing of the lines from one field to the other exists for the purpose of finding out how the differing facets of college art activities may be joined?

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The best architects, at the present time, live in the United States; and their number is unusually great as mentioned in this paper... Perhaps this is not surprising because, with a slight exaggeration, one could say that modern architecture had its beginnings in the USA and Louis Sullivan is the pillar on which the whole development rests.
Abstract: The best architects, at the present time, live in the United States; and their number is unusually great. Perhaps this is not surprising because, with a slight exaggeration, one could say that modern architecture had its beginnings in the United States and Louis Sullivan is the pillar on which the whole development rests. The 1893 International Exhibition at Chicago without doubt corrupted Sullivan's principles through its historical (passe) buildings. Nevertheless in the decades after 1900 Frank Lloyd Wright, Sullivan's greatest pupil, was the leading builder, and so America participated in the international development.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Museum without walls as mentioned in this paper is an example of the Imaginary Museum which modern processes of reproduction have so prodigally spread all around us, thanks to what Malraux calls the Museum without Walls.
Abstract: Everyone knows how Andre Malraux has recently called our attention, in a vivid and unacademic way, to a striking peculiarity of our knowledge of art: we all now are—or all now can be—familiar with everything, thanks to what he calls the Museum without Walls, the Imaginary Museum which modern processes of reproduction have so prodigally spread all around us. We all possess all these riches and take them for granted. A student in college today, without ever leaving his Art Building and even without exerting much effort while in it, probably has shown to him a greater quantity of works of art in slides than his grandfather could ever manage to see with years of persistence in looking at books. And the more serious student has available to him much more even than that in the library of his Art Building: an Imaginary Museum stocked with tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands, of works for which even the late John Russell Pope could not imagine walls enough.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It would be extremely difficult to find an artist who will admit to being a technician rather than a humanist as mentioned in this paper, since the involvement in the work itself is usually so intense and personal that any rationalization of the creative act rarely occurs.
Abstract: It would be extremely difficult to find an artist who will admit to being a technician rather than a humanist. A great many of us will not consider the possibility of a choice. The involvement in the work itself is usually so intense and personal that any rationalization of the creative act rarely, if ever, occurs.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The need for an explanation of a work of art can arise for any number of reasons: questions arise and remain unanswered in the spectator's mind; he or she feels a need to have the work explained; and it is fruitless and unsatisfactory to substitute words for the work itself as a means of communication.
Abstract: Ideally, when there is rapport between the spectator and the artist—when the spectator looks at a work of art which is expressed in an idiom familiar and congenial—the “transaction” between the artist and the spectator is direct and immediate, the communication between them is complete and satisfying. But sometimes, for any number of reasons, the transaction, the communication, is incomplete; questions arise and remain unanswered in the spectator's mind; he feels a need to have the work explained. It is fruitless and most unsatisfactory to substitute words for the work itself as a means of communication, or to approach intellectually what should be, and what fundamentally must be, a sensory or an emotional experience. But the demand for an explanation is understandable.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, the authors points out that Ruskin's reputation as the apostle of truth in representational art is well known, but scattered throughout his work there is a solid body of criticism devoted to non-representational art; particularly he considers those developments which were later to be called abstraction, cubism, and impressionism.
Abstract: John Ruskin's reputation as the apostle of truth in representational art is well known, but scattered throughout his work there is a solid body of criticism devoted to non-representational art; particularly he considers those developments which were later to be called abstraction, cubism, and impressionism.