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JournalISSN: 0010-0994

College English 

National Council of Teachers of English
About: College English is an academic journal published by National Council of Teachers of English. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Literary criticism & College English. It has an ISSN identifier of 0010-0994. Over the lifetime, 3143 publications have been published receiving 38106 citations.


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TL;DR: For instance, at the Modern Language Association (MLA) convention in 1978, a multi-session forum called "Presence, Knowledge, and Authority in the Teaching of Literature" as mentioned in this paper was organized, which included a discussion of the authority and structure of the collaborative classroom structure of "interpretive communities."
Abstract: eighth or ninth on a list of ten items. Last year it appeared again, first on the list. Teachers of literature have also begun to talk about collaborative learning, although not always by that name. It is viewed as a way of engaging students more deeply with the text and also as an aspect of professors' engagement with the professional community. At its 1978 convention the Modern Language Association scheduled a multi-session forum entitled "Presence, Knowledge, and Authority in the Teaching of Literature." One of the associated sessions, called "Negotiations of Literary Knowledge," included a discussion of the authority and structure (including the collaborative classroom structure) of "interpretive communities." At the 1983 MLA convention collaborative practices in reestablishing authority and value in literary studies were examined under such rubrics as "Talking to the Academic Community: Conferences as Institutions" and "How Books 11 and 12 of Paradise Lost Got to be Valuable" (changes in interpretive attitudes in the community of Miltonists). In both these contexts collaborative learning is discussed sometimes as a process that constitutes fields or disciplines of study and sometimes as a pedagogical tool that "works" in teaching composition and literature. The former discussion, often highly theoretical, usually manages to keep at bay the more

1,018 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Iser as mentioned in this paper provides a framework for a theory of literary effects and aesthetic responses, whereby the reader is given the chance to recognize the deficiencies of his own existence and the suggested solutions to counterbalance them.
Abstract: Like no other art form, the novel confronts its readers with circumstances arising from their own environment of social and historical norms and stimulates them to assess and criticize their surroundings. By analyzing major works of English fiction ranging from Bunyan, Fielding, Scott, and Thackeray to Joyce and Beckett, renowned critic Wolfgang Iser here provides a framework for a theory of such literary effects and aesthetic responses. Iser's focus is on the theme of discovery, whereby the reader is given the chance to recognize the deficiencies of his own existence and the suggested solutions to counterbalance them. The content and form of this discovery is the calculated response of the reader -- the implied reader. In discovering the expectations and presuppositions that underlie all his perceptions, the reader learns to \"read\" himself as he does the text.

654 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

558 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors describe Writer-Based Prose as "a verbal expression written by a writer to himself and for himself" that reflects the associative, narrative path of the writer's own verbal thought.
Abstract: IF WRITING IS SIMPLY THE ACT of "expressing what you think" or "saying what you mean," why is writing often such a difficult thing to do? And why do papers that do express what the writer meant (to his or her own satisfaction) often fail to communicate the same meaning to a reader? Although we often equate writing with the straightforward act of "saying what we mean," the mental struggles writers go through and the misinterpretations readers still make suggest that we need a better model of this process. Modern communication theory and practical experience agree; writing prose that actually communicates what we mean to another person demands more than a simple act of self-expression. What communication theory does not tell us is how writers do it. An alternative to the "think it/say it" model is to say that effective writers do not simply express thought but transform it in certain complex but describable ways for the needs of a reader. Conversely, we may find that ineffective writers are indeed merely "expressing" themselves by offering up an unretouched and underprocessed version of their own thought. Writer-Based prose, the subject of this paper, is a description of this undertransformed mode of verbal expression. As both a style of writing and a style of thought, Writer-Based prose is natural and adequate for a writer writing to himself or herself. However, it is the source of some of the most common and pervasive problems in academic and professional writing. The symptoms can range from a mere missing referent or an underdeveloped idea to an unfocused and apparently pointless discussion. The symptoms are diverse but the source can often be traced to the writer's underlying strategy for composing and to his or her failure to transform private thought into a public, reader-based expression. In function, Writer-Based prose is a verbal expression written by a writer to himself and for himself. It is the record and the working of his own verbal thought. In its structure, Writer-Based prose reflects the associative, narrative path of the writer's

488 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202311
202235
20197
201810
201717
201635