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JournalISSN: 2767-1127

Communication and democracy 

Taylor & Francis
About: Communication and democracy is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Politics & Democracy. It has an ISSN identifier of 2767-1127. Over the lifetime, 25 publications have been published receiving 9 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper used the 1917 Silent Protest Parade to demonstrate how Black activists used a strategy of in/civility to contest the spatial-rhetorical norms of white supremacy, claim a citizen identity, and at once expand their rhetorical possibilities and constrain those of white supremacists.
Abstract: This essay uses the case of the 1917 Silent Protest Parade, notable for its early example of organized activism by the NAACP, to argue for a turn away from an either-or understanding of civility and incivility and toward a both-and understanding of the terms, which I term in/civility. Such a shift entails thinking of the terms not as opposites but as entangled resources for rhetorical invention. I use the Parade to demonstrate how Black activists used a strategy of in/civility to contest the spatial-rhetorical norms of white supremacy, claim a citizen identity, and at once expand their rhetorical possibilities and constrain those of white supremacists. In short, in/civility asks critics to recognize the rhetorical force and value of instances where incivility and civility become blurred and calls attention to the raced discrepancies of the terms.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In Mahanoy Area School District v. B.L. as discussed by the authors , the Supreme Court held a public school could not discipline a student for posting offensive snaps about her cheer team on social media.
Abstract: In Mahanoy Area School District v. B.L. (2021), the Supreme Court held a public school could not discipline a student for posting offensive snaps about her cheer team on social media. In an 8-to-1 decision siding with the student, the Justices reaffirmed Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), a landmark decision by the Warren Court that extended speech rights to public school students. The majority in Mahanoy was, however, unwilling to “set forth a broad, highly general First Amendment rule stating just what counts as ‘off-campus’ speech and whether First Amendment standards must give way off-campus to the school’s desire to prevent … disruption of learning-related activities.” Instead, Justice Breyer offered a narrow opinion confined to the facts of the case that provides little practical guidance to students, school officials, and lower courts dealing with thorny issues related to off-campus speech. Further compounding matters, the “three features of off-campus speech” identified in his majority opinion will likely lead to more restrictions governing what students may say on their own time and using their own equipment.

1 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202311
202215