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Showing papers in "Communications of The Ais in 2010"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The most recent version of the IS undergraduate model curriculum is IS 2002 (Gorgone et al., 2003) published in early 2003 as discussed by the authors, which is the most recent output from model curriculum work for Information Systems (IS) that began in the early 1970s.
Abstract: The IS 2010 report is the latest output from model curriculum work for Information Systems (IS) that began in the early 1970s. Prior to this current effort, the most recent version of the IS undergraduate model curriculum is IS 2002 (Gorgone et al., 2003), published in early 2003. IS 2002 was a relatively minor update of IS'97 (Davis et al., 1997). Both IS 2002 and IS '97 were joint efforts by ACM, AIS, and DPMA/AITP (Data Processing Management Association/ Association of Information Technology Professionals). IS'97 was preceded by DPMA'90 (Longenecker and Feinstein 1991) and ACM Curriculum Recommendations 1983 (ACM 1983) and 1973 (Couger 1973). IS 2002 has been widely accepted and it has also been the basis for accreditation of undergraduate programs of Information Systems. This report represents the combined effort of numerous individuals and reflects the interests of thousands of faculty and practitioners. It is grounded in the expected requirements of industry, represents the views of organizations employing the graduates, and is supported by other IS-related organizations.

468 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A trust-theoretic model for consumer adoption of m-payment systems, grounded in literature on "technology adoption" and "trust," not only theorizes the role of consumer trust in m- payment adoption, but also identifies the facilitators for consumer trust on two broad dimensions: mobile service provider characteristics and mobile technology environment characteristics.
Abstract: Consumer adoption of mobile payment (m-payment) solutions is low compared to the acceptance of traditional forms of payments. Motivated by this fact, we propose and test a "trust-theoretic model for consumer adoption of m-payment systems." The model, grounded in literature on "technology adoption" and "trust," not only theorizes the role of consumer trust in m-payment adoption, but also identifies the facilitators for consumer trust in m-payment systems. It proposes two broad dimensions of trust facilitators: "mobile service provider characteristics" and "mobile technology environment characteristics." The model is empirically validated via a sample of potential adopters in Singapore. In contrast to other contexts, results suggest the overarching importance of "consumer trust in m-payment systems" as compared to other technology adoption factors. Further, differential importance of the theorized trust facilitators of "perceived reputation" and "perceived opportunism" of the mobile service provider, and "perceived environmental risk" and "perceived structural assurance" of the mobile technology, are also highlighted. A series of post-hoc analyses establish the robustness of the theorized configuration of constructs. Subsequent, sub-group analyses highlight the differential significance of trust facilitators for different user sub-groups. Implications for research and practice emerging out of this study are also discussed.

261 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper demonstrates the use of both EFGs and CFGs in a design research project in the health care field and discusses the adaptation of focus groups to design research projects.
Abstract: Focus groups to investigate new ideas are widely used in many research fields. The use of focus groups in design research poses interesting opportunities and challenges. Traditional focus group methods must be adapted to meet two specific goals of design research. For the refinement of an artifact design, exploratory focus groups (EFGs) study the artifact to propose improvements in the design. The cycle of build and evaluate using EFGs continues until the artifact is released for field test in the application environment. Then, the field test of the design artifact may employ confirmatory focus groups (CFGs) to establish the utility of the artifact in field use. Rigorous investigation of the artifact requires multiple CFGs to be run with opportunities for quantitative and qualitative data collection and analyses across the multiple CFGs. In this paper, we discuss the adaptation of focus groups to design research projects. We demonstrate the use of both EFGs and CFGs in a design research project in the health care field.

215 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors empirically examine facilitators of e-government and e-business development, the relationship between e-Government and E-business, and their collective impact on national economic performance.
Abstract: Recent years have witnessed rapid developments in e-government as well as e-business within nations across the world. Although both e-government and e-business contribute toward national economic performance, few studies have analyzed the two jointly in a single research model. Using the Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE) framework and the literature on information and communication technology (ICT) impact; we empirically examine facilitators of e-government and e-business development, the relationship between e-government and e-business, and their collective impact on national economic performance. Our results, which emphasize the differential importance of factors associated with the development of e-government and e-business, can be used by national policy makers for designing effective ICT policies. Specifically, national ICT infrastructure appears to be important for both e-government and e-business. Quality of national human capital emerges as a significant facilitator for e-government but not for e-business, whereas national environment (institutional and macro-economic) appears to be the key enabler for e-business, but not for e-government. Our findings demonstrate the significant and intertwined roles of e-government and e-business in enhancing the national economic performance. With a view to enhancing national economic gains, this research suggests that policy makers should consider measures to enhance development of e-government and e-business collectively rather than in silos.

111 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Viewing systems as services proves to be an umbrella for developing new systems analysis and design methods, improving business/IT communication, and finding practical paths toward greater relevance and significance in business and society.
Abstract: Despite wide agreement that we are in a service-dominated economy, there has been little movement toward treating service and service metaphors as core aspects of the IS field. This tutorial proposes that viewing systems as services is a potentially fruitful but generally unexplored approach for thinking about systems in organizations, systems analysis, and numerous applications of IT. An extension of past research in several areas, viewing systems as services proves to be an umbrella for developing new systems analysis and design methods, improving business/IT communication, and finding practical paths toward greater relevance and significance in business and society.

103 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Five BPM programs of five universities from Australia, Europe, Africa, and North America are presented, describing the BPM content covered, program and course structures, and challenges and lessons learned, illustrating a heterogeneous view of BPM.
Abstract: In response to the growing proliferation of Business Process Management (BPM) in industry and the demand this creates for BPM expertise, universities across the globe are at various stages of incorporating knowledge and skills in their teaching offerings. However, there are still only a handful of institutions that offer specialized education in BPM in a systematic and in-depth manner. This article is based on a global educators' panel discussion held at the 2009 European Conference on Information Systems in Verona, Italy. The article presents the BPM programs of five universities from Australia, Europe, Africa, and North America, describing the BPM content covered, program and course structures, and challenges and lessons learned. The article also provides a comparative content analysis of BPM education programs illustrating a heterogeneous view of BPM. The examples presented demonstrate how different courses and programs can be developed to meet the educational goals of a university department, program, or school. This article contributes insights on how best to continuously sustain and reshape BPM education to ensure it remains dynamic, responsive, and sustainable in light of the evolving and ever-changing marketplace demands for BPM expertise.

83 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose a theoretical model to understand the impact of IT-enabled business processes and IT-business alignment on the strategic and operational success of a firm and whether the impacts experience a lag effect.
Abstract: For the past two decades, researchers have sought to understand how IT investment leads to organizational success. However, this has proven to be an elusive goal. We posit that a new perspective is needed to better understand IT investment. We must examine how the investment is enacted and reflected within the firm. We will argue that investment is enacted within the technology resources and corresponding business processes and reflected in the IT-business alignment. Based on the literature within Dynamics Capabilities Theory and IT-Business Alignment, we will propose a theoretical model that seeks to understand the impact of IT-enabled business processes and IT-business alignment on the strategic and operational success of a firm and whether the impacts experience a lag effect. Using data from fifty-eight European firms over a two-year period, we will build a structural equation model to test our theoretical model. The results indicate that alignment is important for strategic and operational success in year 1 but not in year 2. Furthermore, of the two, alignment has a stronger impact on strategic than operational success. In contrast, business process performance has an impact on organizational performance in year 1 and year 2. For both years, the impact on operational success is stronger than the strategic one. We also notice that the impact of business process performance on operational success decreases between year 1 and year 2, whereas the impact on strategic success is stronger in year 2 than in year 1.

78 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the impact of beliefs regarding the characteristics of e-commerce and the trustworthiness of web merchants on intentions to use E-commerce differ according to gender, and no differences were found for perceived ease of use and Web merchant trustworthiness.
Abstract: Despite the spread of e-commerce, few studies have investigated gender-based differences in the adoption of consumer-oriented electronic commerce. Theory and evidence from other domains indicates that such differences may exist. Using innovation diffusion theory as a framework, we empirically investigate whether the impact of beliefs regarding the characteristics of e-commerce and the trustworthiness of Web merchants on intentions to use e-commerce differ according to gender. Results indicate that such differences do exist. Perceived compatibility and visibility have greater impacts for women. In contrast, males' use intentions are more driven by perceived relative advantage and result demonstrability. No differences were found for perceived ease of use and Web merchant trustworthiness.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Core values of the management strategies are reconstructed and used as a lens through which a case study of e-government is analyzed, finding that neither bureaucracy nor NPM alone supply the core values for e- government as a practical management strategy.
Abstract: There are different interpretations of which core values e-government build on and promote. Some scholars see egovernment as a direct follower to New Public Management (NPM), and as such supporting and promoting values and principles from the business sector. Others see e-government as a promoter of bureaucratic values supporting and promoting the values of traditional weberian ideal bureaucracy. The main issue in this paper is management strategy for public administration. Three examples of such management strategies are examined and compared: traditional bureaucracy, New Public Management and e-government. When investigating these strategies it is necessary to distinguish between strategy as idea and strategy in action. Core values of the management strategies are reconstructed and used as a lens through which a case study of e-government is analyzed. The implemented egovernment-solution comprise values from both NPM and bureaucracy. Neither bureaucracy nor NPM alone supply the core values for e-government as a practical management strategy. The paper concludes with a dialectical structure where Bureaucracy is the thesis, NPM the anti-thesis and e-government the practical synthesis.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results indicate research is required in the areas of: (a) IT value stream proposition, (b) human-computer interaction, (c) legal/ethical issues surrounding mobile computing-enabled activities, and (d) organizational/societal impact and change precipitated by mobile computing technologies.
Abstract: We analyze mobile computing trends in research and practice between the years 2000–2009 with an inductive categorization of 806 articles in nineteen leading academic, crossover, and practitioner outlets. We integrate this categorization with previous research in mobile commerce and e-business in order to provide the most comprehensive categorization to date. Using this categorization, we next investigate trends in the discussion and research on mobile computing. From these trends, we develop a comprehensive framework that addresses both where mobile computing research has been over the past ten years, but also areas of opportunity for future research. Results indicate research is required in the areas of: (a) IT value stream proposition (both within and outside the firm), (b) human-computer interaction (designing usable mobile computing systems), (c) legal/ethical issues surrounding mobile computing-enabled activities, and (d) organizational/societal impact and change precipitated by mobile computing technologies.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It was found that each CMC satisfied different motivations for its use, and that overall CMC best fulfilled information seeking, convenience, connectivity, and content management motivations.
Abstract: Despite a growing stream of research into the use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) media in higher education, there remains limited understanding about the students‘ motivations for using CMC alongside non-CMC media within a learning context. This article identifies seven dimensions of motivation from the perspective of uses and gratifications (U&G), including information seeking, convenience, connectivity, problem solving, content management, social presence, and social context cues. It was found that each CMC satisfied different motivations for its use, and that overall CMC best fulfilled information seeking, convenience, connectivity, and content management motivations. This study also identifies a number of similarities and differences between CMC and nonCMC media in terms of the motivations for their use. Finally, the study concludes with a discussion of the implications for Information Systems (IS) researchers, higher education, and organizations.



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Institutional theory is used to propose factors that are expected to influence the adoption of electronic health records by independent physician practices in the coming years and presents a model describing the role of coercive, mimetic, and normative forces on adoption intent.
Abstract: With the recent legislation providing financial incentives to physicians who acquire electronic health record systems, we will be afforded an opportunity to study incentivized adoption of technology coupled with the threat of future penalties for non-adoption. This research uses institutional theory to propose factors that are expected to influence the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by independent physician practices in the coming years. The study presents a model describing the role of coercive, mimetic, and normative forces on adoption intent. Payer incentives/penalties as well as dominant healthcare delivery partners will exert coercive pressures on physician practices. Additionally, since physicians identify with their own specialties, it is expected that they will also be subject to mimetic forces resulting from successful adoption by similar specialists, particularly given their concerns about expected benefits from these systems. Finally, normative forces resulting from the successful interoperation of electronic health records among regional providers should influence physician adoption. The ability to partner with other physicians and healthcare providers or vendors adopting the same system should increase individual practice adoption intent in the presence of coercive, mimetic, and/or normative forces.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A framework for conceptualizing creativity within business processes is introduced that describes three types of uncertainty and constraints as well as the interrelationships among these and is intended to serve as a sensitizing device that can guide further information systems research on creativity-related phenomena.
Abstract: Creative processes, for instance, the development of visual effects or computer games, increasingly become part of the agenda of information systems researchers and practitioners. Such processes get their managerial challenges from the fact that they comprise both well-structured, transactional parts and creative parts. The latter can often not be precisely specified in terms of control flow, required resources, and outcome. The processes’ high uncertainty sets boundaries for the application of traditional business process management concepts, such as process automation, process modeling, process performance measurement, and risk management. Organizations must thus exercise caution when it comes to managing creative processes and supporting these with information technology. This, in turn, requires a profound understanding of the concept of creativity in business processes. In response to this, the present paper introduces a framework for conceptualizing creativity within business processes. The conceptual framework describes three types of uncertainty and constraints as well as the interrelationships among these. The study is grounded in the findings from three case studies that were conducted in the film and visual effects industry. Moreover, we provide initial evidence for the framework’s validity beyond this narrow focus. The framework is intended to serve as a sensitizing device that can guide further information systems research on creativity-related phenomena.



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review on the educational use of social software systematically analyze and compare the diverse social software tools and identify their contributions to teaching and learning.
Abstract: Higher education institutions are increasingly using social software tools to support teaching and learning. Despite the fact that social software is often used in a social context, these applications can significantly contribute to the educational experience of a student. However, as the social software domain comprises a considerable diversity of tools, the respective tools can be expected to differ in the way they can contribute to teaching and learning. In this review on the educational use of social software, we systematically analyze and compare the diverse social software tools and identify their contributions to teaching and learning. By integrating established learning theory and the extant literature on the individual social software applications we seek to contribute to a theoretical foundation for social software use and the choice of tools. Case vignettes from several UK higher education institutions are used to illustrate the different applications of social software tools in teaching and learning.



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The official version of this paper is available on the Communications of the Association for Information Systems website: http://aisel.org/cais/vol26/iss1/1/.
Abstract: The official version of this paper is available on the Communications of the Association for Information Systems website: http://aisel.aisnet.org/cais/vol26/iss1/1/. The AIS owns the copyright to this article and the version below may only be used for not-for-profit purposes.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This dissertation aims to provide a history of web exceptionalism from 1989 to 2002, a period chosen in order to explore its roots as well as specific cases up to and including the year in which descriptions of “Web 2.0” began to circulate.
Abstract: Follow this and additional works at: http://ecommons.udayton.edu/mis_fac_pub Part of the Business Administration, Management, and Operations Commons, Databases and Information Systems Commons, Higher Education Commons, Management Information Systems Commons, Management Sciences and Quantitative Methods Commons, Operations and Supply Chain Management Commons, and the Other Computer Sciences Commons