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Showing papers in "Contemporary Sociology in 2003"



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors presented the current thinking on age stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination by researchers in gerontology, psychology, sociology, and communication, as well as suggestions on how to reduce ageism for the approaching "graying of America."
Abstract: Along with race and gender, people commonly use age to categorize -- and form stereotypes about -- others. Of the three categories, age is the only one in which the members of the in-group (the young) will eventually join the out-group (the old). Although ageism is found cross-culturally, it is especially prevalent in the United States, where most people regard growing older with depression, fear, and anxiety. Older people in the United States are stigmatized and marginalized, with often devastating consequences. Although researchers have paid a great deal of attention to racism and sexism, there has been a dearth of research on ageism. A major reason for this neglect is that age prejudice is still considered socially acceptable. As baby boomers approach retirement age, however, there has been increased academic and popular interest in aging. This volume presents the current thinking on age stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination by researchers in gerontology, psychology, sociology, and communication. The book presents theoretical and empirical findings on the origins and effects of ageism, as well as suggestions on how to reduce ageism for the approaching "graying of America."

911 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a cross-national comparative approach to spouses' carers is presented, with a focus on couples' roles in their spouses' work. But the authors do not consider the role of spouses' spouses in their work.
Abstract: 1. A CROSS-NATIONAL COMPARATIVE APPROACH TO COUPLES' CAREERS 3. SPOUSES' EMPLOYMENT CAREERS IN (WEST) GERMANY 6. THE EMPLOYMENT BEHAVIOUR OF MARRIED WOMEN IN ITALY 8. MARRIED WOMEN'S EMPLOYMENT PATTERNS IN BRITAIN 10. EARNINGS AS A FORCE OF ATTRACTION AND SPECIALISATION IN SWEDEN 12. EMPLOYMENT PATTERNS OF MARRIED WOMEN IN POLAND 15. CAREERS OF COUPLES AND TRENDS IN INEQUALITY

378 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Education Gap is the first book to gather a significant body of data on vouchers in multiple locations, and it reveals startling new evidence that voucher programs benefit African-American students more than participants from other ethnic groups as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: While the merits of vouchers have been the subject of intense public debate in recent years, there has been very little available evidence upon which to gauge their efficacy. The first publicly funded voucher plan involving private schools wasn't established until 1990 in Milwaukee; before then, the only data on school choice came from a small, poorly designed program in California. Voucher programs grew dramatically in the latter half of the 1990s. In 2000, about 60,000 students participated in seventy-one programs, most privately funded. This growth is now providing researchers with the ability to measure the impact of vouchers for the first time in multiple cities. The Education Gap is the first book to gather a significant body of data on vouchers in multiple locations, and it reveals startling new evidence that voucher programs benefit African-American students more than participants from other ethnic groups. To explain this phenomenon, the authors point out that residential selection is the most common form of school choice available in American public education today. Since this process is likely to leave African Americans in the worst public schools, new forms of choice directed toward low-income families are most likely to benefit black students. The authors examine the effects of school vouchers on test scores, parental satisfaction, parent-school communications, and political tolerance among students and parents participating in four pilot programs in New York City; Dayton, Ohio; Washington, D.C.; the Edgewood school district in San Antonio; and a program that offered vouchers to 40,000 low-income families nationwide. Though the programs operated in a wide variety of settings, the findings were surprisingly consistent. After two years, African-American students who used vouchers to switch from public to private schools scored substantially better on math and reading tests. By contrast, no significant positive effects on the test scores of other ethnic groups were detected. While parents in all ethnic groups were generally more supportive of private education, African-American parents expressed particularly high enthusiasm for the private schools their children attended. The authors also report information on the kinds of students and families who take advantage of a voucher opportunity, allowing them to seewhether only the i??degreebest and brightesti??i?? public school students were able to take advantage of school voucher programs. The results documented in The Education Gap shed new light on the effects of school vouchers on students in poor, urban environments. This information will be important to policymakers, scholars, and citizens are they continue to search for ways to improve education in urban areas.

370 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Held and McGrew reflect on the central questions of political life posed by the great globalization debate, namely: who rules, in whose interests, to what ends, and by what means? They conclude by proposing a new political agenda for the twenty-first century.
Abstract: What is globalization? Why is it the source of such intense controversy? Is it creating a more disorderly world or can globalization be tamed? In the aftermath of September 11th, these questions have acquired a new and even greater sense of urgency. This short book provides a key to understanding one of the most important intellectual and political debates of our times. The authors interrogate the evidence about globalization and assess global trends. Issues of governance, culture, the economy, patterns of inequality and global ethics are discussed in relation to the contending claims and counterclaims of the principal positions in the globalization debate: the globalizers and anti-globalizers. Held and McGrew reflect on the central questions of political life posed by the great globalization debate, namely: who rules, in whose interests, to what ends, and by what means? They conclude by proposing a new political agenda for the twenty-first century – a global covenant of cosmopolitan social democracy. This book is an excellent guide for all those intrigued, confused or simply baffled by globalization and its impact.

318 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The fastest growing ethnic group in the United States and will comprise a quarter of the country's population by mid-century, according to a recent study by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Latinos are the fastest-growing ethnic group in the United States and will comprise a quarter of the country's population by mid-century. This landmark book is the most definitive and comprehensive snapshot available of this trend. A new preface includes the most recent data on a variety of indicators of the changing Latino landscape in the United States. This book is co published by David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the extent to which adults contribute time to caregiving, social support, and financial assistance to family members; the time given to volunteer work and financial contributions to various causes, charities, and organizations; and how these contributions are affected by job obligations.
Abstract: From all sides we hear that Americans are becoming increasingly self-absorbed and disconnected, and that our interest in social and civic responsibility is on the decline. A more encouraging profile emerges in this study of Americans at work, at home with their families, and in their communities. The book is based on a national, representative survey of more than 3,000 Americans aged 25 to 74 plus in-depth interviews with adults drawn from the survey to find out what Americans mean by social responsibility. The book explores the extent to which adults contribute time to caregiving, social support, and financial assistance to family members; the time given to volunteer work and financial contributions to various causes, charities, and organizations; and how these contributions are affected by job obligations. A major focus is on age and gender differences, which shows midlife to be a transitional time when civic activities increase as family obligations decline. All told, the study adds a hopeful new voice to the overwhelmingly negative debate about the current state of our civic and social lives."

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Gal and Kligman as discussed by the authors discuss the relationship between ideology, politics, and common sense in the context of women's reproductive rights in the Czech and Slovak Republics during the 1990s.
Abstract: ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ix INTRODUCTION Susan Gal and Gail Kligman 3 PART ONE: REPRODUCTION AS POLITICS 21 CHAPTER 1 Between Ideology, Politics, and Common Sense: The Discourse of Reproductive Rights in Poland - Eleonora Zielinska 23 CHAPTER 2 Reproductive Policies in the Czech and Slovak Republics - Sharon L. Wolchik 58 CHAPTER 3 Talking about Women and Wombs: The Discourse of Abortion and Reproductive Rights in the G.D.R. during and after the Wende - Eva Maleck-Lewy and Myra Marx Ferree 92 CHAPTER 4 Birth Strike in the New Federal States: Is Sterilization an Act of Resistance? - Irene Dolling, Daphne Hahn, and Sylka Scholz 118 PART TWO: GENDER RELATIONS IN EVERYDAY LIFE 149 CHAPTER 5 Changing Images of Identity in Poland: From the Self-Sacrificing to the Self-Investing Woman? - Mira Marody andAnna Giza-Poleszczuk 151 CHAPTER 6 Women's Life Trajectories and Class Formation in Hungary - Katalin Kovacs and Monika Varadi 176 CHAPTER 7 From Informal Labor to Paid Occupations: Marketization from below in Hungarian Women's Work - Julia Szalai 200 CHAPTER 8 Women's Sexuality and Reproductive Behavior in Post-Ceausescu Romania: A Psychological Approach - Adriana Baban 225 PART THREE: ARENAS OF POLITICAL ACTION: STRUGGLES FOR REPRESENTATION 257 CHAPTER 9 New Gender Relations in Poland in the 1990s - Malgorzata Fuszara 259 CHAPTER 10 New Parliament, Old Discourse? The Parental Leave Debate in Hungary - Joanna Goven 286 CHAPTER 11 Women's NGOs in Romania - Laura Grunberg 307 CHAPTER 12 Women's Problems, Women's Discourses in Bulgaria - Krassimira Daskalova 370 CHAPTER 13 Belgrade's SOS Hotline for Women and Children Victims of Violence: A Report - Zorica Mrsevic 370 CHAPTER 14 Media Representations of Men and Women in Times of War and Crisis: The Case of Serbia - Jasmina Lukic 393 CONCLUSION Susan Gal and Gail Kligman 424 CONTRIBUTORS 427 INDEX 429

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an expanded notion of spectatorship with a more dynamic sense of embodied and performed engagement with places, highlighting the often contradictory, contested and paradoxical constructions of landscape and community involved both in tourist attractions and among tourists themselves.
Abstract: Many accounts of tourism have adopted an almost paradigmatic visual model of the gaze. This collection presents an expanded notion of spectatorship with a more dynamic sense of embodied and performed engagement with places. The approach resonates with ideas in anthropology, sociology, and geography on performance, invented traditions, constructed places and traveling cultures. Contributions highlight the often contradictory, contested and paradoxical constructions of landscape and community involved both in tourist attractions and among tourists themselves. The collection examines many different practices, ranging from the energetic pursuit of adventure holidays to the reading of holiday brochures. It illustrates different techniques of seeing the landscape and a variety of ways of creating and performing the local. Chapters thus demonstrate the mutual entanglement of practices, images, conventions, and creativity. They chart these global flows of people, texts, images, and artefacts. Case studies are drawn from diverse types of tourism and destination focused around North America, Europe, and Australasia. Simon Coleman teaches in the Department of Anthropology, University of Durham. Mike Crang is Lecturer in the Department of Geography, University of Durham.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The New Poverty Studies as mentioned in this paper examines the new war against the poor that has accompanied the rise of the New Economy in the past two decades, and details the myriad ways poor people have struggled against it.
Abstract: Stock market euphoria and blind faith in the post cold war economy have driven the topic of poverty from popular and scholarly discussion in the United States. At the same time the gap between the rich and poor has never been wider. The New Poverty Studies critically examines the new war against the poor that has accompanied the rise of the New Economy in the past two decades, and details the myriad ways poor people have struggled against it. The essays collected here explore how global, national, and local structures of power produce poverty and affect the material well-being, social relations and politicization of the poor. In updating the 1960s encounter between ethnography and U.S. poverty, The New Poverty Studies highlights the ways poverty is constructed across multiple scales and multiple axes of difference. Questioning the common wisdom that poverty persists because of the pathology, social isolation and welfare state "dependency" of the poor, the contributors to The New Poverty Studies point instead to economic restructuring and neoliberal policy "reforms" which have caused increased social inequality and economic polarization in the U.S. Contributors include: Georges Fouron, Donna Goldstein, Judith Goode, Susan B. Hyatt, Catherine Kingfisher, Peter Kwong, Vin Lyon-Callo, Jeff Maskovsky, Sandi Morgen, Leith Mullings, Frances Fox Piven, Matthew Rubin, Nina Glick Schiller, Carol Stack, Jill Weigt, Eve Weinbaum, Brett Williams, and Patricia Zavella. "These contributions provide a dynamic understanding of poverty and immiseration" North American Dialogue, Vol. 4, No. 1, Nov. 2001

BookDOI
TL;DR: Invitation to the Life Course: Toward New Understandings of Later Life as mentioned in this paper discusses the challenges of age, time, and social contexts for the study of aging and later life.
Abstract: Invitation to the Life Course: Toward New Understandings of Later Life discusses in depth the challenges of age, time, and social contexts for the study of aging and later life. Understanding aging (as a process) and later life (as a period) must be accompanied by serious attention to the life course. This brings significant challenges related to time, as gerontologists must describe and explain life patterns over many decades. It also brings significant challenges related to place, as gerontologists must examine how social contexts structure pathways into and through later life, and how those contexts affect the nature and meaning of experiences along the way. This book is a natural extension of the editor's previous work, ""Lives in Time and Place: The Problems and Promises of Developmental Science"" (Baywood, 1999).

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a survey of the sociological study of the built environment and its relationship with the natural environment, as well as a discussion of the social dimensions of global environmental change.
Abstract: Environmental Sociology: An Introduction by Riley E. Dunlap, William Michelson, and Glenn Stalker Sociological Theory and the Natural Environment by Frederick H. Buttel and Craig R. Humphrey Theory and the Sociological Study of the Built Environment by William Michelson and Willem van Vliet-- Socio-Behavioral Qualities of the Built Environment by Sherry Ahrentzen Macro-Environments and People: Cities, Suburbs, and Metropolitan Areas by David Popenoe and William Michelson Designing the Built Environment by Leslie Kilmartin Rural Environments and Agriculture by Don E. Albrecht and Steve H. Murdock Energy, Society, and Environment by Loren Lutzenhiser, Craig K. Harris, and Marvin E. Olsen Natural Hazards and Disasters by Joanne M. Nigg and Dennis Mileti Technological Hazards and Disasters by Steve Kroll-Smith, Stephen R. Couch, and Adeline G. Levine Risk, Technology, and Society by Thomas Dietz, R. Scott Frey, and Eugene A. Rosa Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change by Thomas Dietz and Eugene A. Rosa Social Impact Assessment and Technology Assessment by Kurt Finsterbusch and William R. Freudenburg The Environmental Movement in the United States by Angela G. Mertig, Riley E. Dunlap and Denton R. Morrison Environmental Concern: Conceptual and Measurement Issues by Riley E. Dunlap and Robert Emmet Jones Environmental Sociology in Nonacademic Settings by Barbara A. Payne and Christopher Cluett

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Theories of globalization and social movement mobilization are discussed in this article, where the authors explain crossnational similarities among social movements and protest against the Global Trade Regime and the global economy.
Abstract: Chapter 1 1 Globalization and Resistance: An Introduction Part 2 I Theories of Globalization and Social Movement Mobilization Chapter 3 2 Explaining Crossnational Similarities Among Social Movements Chapter 4 3 Transnational Structures and Protest: Linking Theories and Assessing Evidence Part 5 II Transnational Mobilization and National Politics Chapter 6 4 Irish Transnational Social Movements, Migrants, and the State System Chapter 7 5 Conservation TSMOs: Shaping the Protected Area Systems of Less Developed Countries Part 8 III Transnational Diffusion and Framing Processes Chapter 9 6 Transnational Diffusion and the African American Reinvention of the Ghandian Repertoire Chapter 10 7 From Local to Global: The Anti-Dam Movement in Southern Brazil, 1979-1992 Chapter 11 8 Creating Transnational Solidarity: The Use of Narrative in the U. S.- Central America Peace Movement Part 12 IV Transnational Networks Chapter 13 9 Elite Alliances and Transnational Environmental Movement Organizations Chapter 14 10 Building Networks from the Outside In: Japanese NGOs and the Kyoto Climate Change Conference Part 15 V Protest and the Global Trade Regime Chapter 16 11 Transnational Political Processes and Contention Against the Global Economy Chapter 17 12 Globalizing Resistance: The Battle of Seattle and the Future of Social Movements Part 18 Conclusion Chapter 19 13 From Lumping to Spiltting: Specifying Globalization and Resistance

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A Sociological Analysis of Animal Oppression and the Capitalist State and the Social Construction of Speciesist Reality points towards a United Struggle against Oppression.
Abstract: Part 1 Foreword Part 2 Introduction Chapter 3 1 Toward A Sociological Analysis of Animal Oppression Chapter 4 2 Economic Basis of Animal Oppression Chapter 5 3 Capitalist Expansion and Oppression Chapter 6 4 The Growth of Agribusiness and Global Oppression Chapter 7 5 Oppression and the Capitalist State Chapter 8 6 The Social Construction of Speciesist Reality Chapter 9 7 Toward A United Struggle against Oppression


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a Decade on Class and Party Politics: What have we learned in a decade on class and party politics? Chapter 2: Are Social Classes Dying? Chapter 3: The Persistence of Classes in Post-Industrial Societies Chapter 4: The Declining Political Significance of Social Class Chapter 5: Class and Politics in Advanced Industrial Societies, and Democratic Class Struggle in Postwar Societies: Traditional Class Voting in Twenty Countries.
Abstract: Contents: List of Figure and Tables Introduction Chapter 1: What have we learned in a Decade on Class and Party Politics? Chapter 2: Are Social Classes Dying? Chapter 3: The Persistence of Classes in Post-Industrial Societies Chapter 4: The Declining Political Significance of Social Class Chapter 5: Class and Politics in Advanced Industrial Societies Chapter 6: The Democratic Class Struggle in Postwar Societies: Traditional Class Voting in Twenty Countries Chapter 7: Class Paradigm and Politics Chapter 8: Class, Culture, and Conservatism: Reassessing Education as a Variable in Political Sociology Chapter 9: Social Class and Voting: The Case Against Decline Chapter 10: Upper-Middle-Class Politics and Policy Outcomes: Does Class Identity Matter? Chapter 11: The Decline of Class Ideologies: The End of Political Exceptionalism? Chapter 12: The Debate Over "Are Social Classes Dying?" Contributors Index


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors reviewed the book "Organizing America: Wealth, Power, and the Origins of Corporate Capitalism" by Charles Perrow, and found that it is a good book to read.
Abstract: The article reviews the book “Organizing America: Wealth, Power and the Origins of Corporate Capitalism,” by Charles Perrow.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a comprehensive overview of trade unionism in Europe and beyond, Richard Hyman offers a fresh perspective on trade union identity, ideology and strategy, showing how the varied forms and impact of different national movements reflect historical choices on whether to emphasize a role as market bargainers, mobilizers of class opposition or partners in social integration.
Abstract: In this comprehensive overview of trade unionism in Europe and beyond, Richard Hyman offers a fresh perspective on trade union identity, ideology and strategy. He shows how the varied forms and impact of different national movements reflect historical choices on whether to emphasize a role as market bargainers, mobilizers of class opposition or partners in social integration. The book demonstrates how these inherited traditions can serve as both resources and constraints in responding to the challenges which confront trade unions in today's working world.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a survey of critical race theory at the turn of the millennium, focusing on the first decade of the 21st century and focusing on race, gender, and sexual orientation.
Abstract: Foreword: Who Are We? And Why Are We Here? Doing Critical Race Theory in Hard Times --Charles R. Lawrence III Introduction: Battles Waged, Won, and Lost: Critical Race Theory at the Turn of the Millennium --Francisco Valdes, Jerome McCristal Culp, and Angela P. Harris Part I: Histories 1. The First Decade: Critical Reflections, or "A Foot In the Closing Door" --Kimberle Williams Crenshaw 2. Historicizing Critical Race Theory's Cutting Edge: Key Movements that Performed the Theory --Sumi Cho and Robert Westley 3. Keeping It Real: On Anti-"Essentialism" --Catharine A. MacKinnon Part II: Crossroads Section A: Race Critiquing "Race' and Its Uses: Critical Race Theory's Uncompleted Argument --Robert S. Chang 4. The Poetics of Colorlined Space --Anthony Paul Farley 5. Un-Natural Things: Constructions of Race, Gender, and Disability --Robert L. Hayman, Jr., and Nancy Levit 6. Race and the Immigration Laws: The Need for Critical Inquiry --Kevin R. Johnson 7. "Simple Logic": Race, the Identity Documents Rule, and the Story of a Nation Besieged and Betrayed --Sherene H. Razack 8. Straight Out of the Closet: Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation --Devon W. Carbado Section B: Narrativity Celebrating Racialized Legal Narratives --Margaret E. Montoya 9. The Unbearable Whiteness of Being --Thomas Ross 10. Construction Project: Color Me Queer + Color Me Family = Camilo's Story --Victoria Ortiz and Jennifer Elrod 11. On Being Homeless: One Aboriginal Woman's "Conquest" of Canadian Universities --1989-98 --Patricia Monture-Angus 12. Dinner and Self-Determination --Henry J. Richardson III Section C: Globalization Critical Race Theory in Global Context --Celina Romany 13. Global Markets, Racial Spaces, and the Role of Critical Race Theory in the Struggle for Community Control of Investments: An Institutional Class Analysis --Elizabeth M. Iglesias 14. Global Feminism at the Local Level: The Criminalization of Female Genital Surgeries --Isabelle R. Gunning 15. Breaking Cycles of Inequality: Critical Theory, Human Rights, and Family In/Justice --Berta Esperanza Hermandez-Truyol 16. Critical Race Theory and Post-Colonial Development --Enrique R. Carrasco Part III: Directions 17. Critical Coalitions: Theory and Praxis --Julie A. Su and Eric Y. Yamamoto 18. Beyond, and Not Beyond, Black and White: Deconstruction has a Politics --Mari Matsuda 19. Outsider Scholars, Critical Race Theory, and "Outcrit" Perspectivity: Postsubordination Vision as Jurisprudential Method --Francisco Valdes Afterword: The Handmaid's Truth --Derrick A. Bell About the Contributors

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Hobson and Hobden as discussed by the authors discuss the need to bring historical sociology back into international relations, and the importance of historical sociology in the future of international relations in the context of international systems.
Abstract: Part I. Introduction: 1. What's at stake in 'bringing historical sociology back into international relations?' John M. Hobson 2. Historical sociology: back to the future of international relations? Stephen Hobden Part II. Historical Sociologies of International Relations: 3. The two waves of Weberian historical sociology in international relations John M. Hobson 4. Neo-Weberian historical sociology and the question of epochal transformations Randall Collins 5. Globality and historical sociology: state, revolution and war revisited Martin Shaw 6. Historical sociology and constructivism: an estranged past, a federated future? Michael Barnett 7. The idea of history and history with ideas Christian Reus-Smit 8. World system analysis, historical sociology and international relations: the difference a hyphen makes Barry K. Gills 9. Towards a critical sociology of transnational harm Andrew Linklater 10. International systems in world history: remaking the study of international relations Barry Buzan and Richard Little Part III. Conclusion: The Future of Historical Sociology in International Relations: 11. Historical sociology and international relations theory Steve Smith 12. For an international sociology Fred Halliday 13. On the road toward a historicised conception of international sociology John M. Hobson and Stephen Hobden.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a case study of the relationship between the human body and the country in the context of travel, focusing on the consumption of space and the spaces of consumption.
Abstract: Chapter 1 Introduction Part 2 Theoretical Perspectives Chapter 3 Approaches to Consumption: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives Chapter 4 The Process of McDonaldization is not Uniform nor are Its Settings, Consumers, or the Consumption of Its Goods and Services Chapter 5 Mass Tourism or the Re-enchantment of the World? Issues and Contradictions in the Study of Travel Chapter 6 Shopping and Postmodernism: Consumption, Production, Identity and the Internet Part 7 Case Studies Chapter 8 Brain-Suck Chapter 9 The Rise of "The Toddler" as Subject and as Merchandising Category in the 1930's Chapter 10 The Body and the Country: A Political Ecology of Consumption Chapter 11 Packaging Violence: Media, Story Sequencing and the Perception of Right and Wrong Chapter 12 The Commodifcation of Sports: The Example of Personal Seat Liscenses in Professional Football Chapter 13 The Commodification of Rebellion: Rock Culture and Consumer Capitalism Chapter 14 Fantasy Tours: Exploring the Global Consumption of Carribean Sex Toursims Chapter 15 Commodification and Theming of the Sacred: Changing Patterns of Tourist Consumption in the "Holy Land" Chapter 16 The Consumption of Space and the Spaces of Consumption

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors assess the forces of change at play in the development of American universities and their prospects for the future based on new data and new analytical frameworks, and discuss the major changes that will affect American universities over the next thirty years.
Abstract: Based on new data and new analytical frameworks, this book assesses the forces of change at play in the development of American universities and their prospects for the future. The book begins with a lengthy introduction by Clark Kerr that not only provides an overview of change since the time he coined the phrase "the city of intellect" but also discusses the major changes that will affect American universities over the next thirty years. Part One examines demographic and economic changes, such as the rise of nearly universal higher education, private gift and corporate sponsorship of research, new labor market opportunities, and increasing inequality among institutions and disciplines. Part Two assesses the profound influence of the Internet and other technologies on teaching and learning. Part Three describes how the various forces of change affect the nature of academic research and the organization of disciplines and the curriculum. Part Four analyzes the consequences of change for university governance and the means by which universities in the future can maintain high levels of achievement while maintaining high levels of autonomy. The contributors include many of today's leading scholars of higher education. They are Andrew Abbott, Steven Brint, Richard Chait, Burton R. Clark, Randall Collins, David J. Collis, Roger L. Geiger, Patricia J. Gumport, Clark Kerr, Richard A. Lanham, Jason Owen-Smith, Walter W. Powell, Sheila Slaughter, and Carol Tomlinson-Keasey.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Garbage Wars: The Struggle for Environmental Justice in Chicago is an analysis of the politics of garbage in Chicago, in particular, and the United States, in general as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Review: Garbage Wars: The Struggle for Environmental Justice in Chicago By David Naguib Pellow Reviewed by Alan L. Chan Chinese Lutheran Church, San Francisco, USA David Naguib Pellow. Garbage Wars: The Struggle for Environmental Justice in Chicago. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2002. 234 pp. ISBN 0-262-16212- 1 (cloth). US$24.95 The question that motivated Pellow to write this book was: what are the origins of environmental inequality and environmental racism with regard to policies on the management of solid waste in urban areas? (p. 5) The author is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, San Diego. As the title suggests, Garbage Wars: The Struggle for Environmental Justice in Chicago is an analysis of the politics of garbage in Chicago, in particular, and the United States, in general. There are altogether seven chapters plus an extensive 21-page reference section in this book. The topics of the seven chapters are: 1. Waste, Politics, and Environmental Injustice; 2. A Social History of Waste, Race, and Labor, Part I: Movements, Technology, and Politics, 1880s-1930s; 3. A Social History of Waste, Race, and Labor, Part II: Waste Management and Waste Conflicts, 1940s-2000; 4. The Movement for Environmental Justice in Chicago and the United States; 5. Working for the Movement: Recycling Labor at the Resource Center; 6. The Next Evolutionary Stage: Recycling Waste or Recycling History?; and 7. Toward Environmental Justice. As an activist-scholar, Pellow frames the garbage wars as a struggle against environmental racism, rather than simply battles over natural resource management and community resources (p. vii). Realizing the complexity and disturbing reality of environmental racism, he agues that not only are local and/or state governments and industry often guilty of perpetrating acts of injustice, but often environmentalists and certain people of color are also implicated in creating these problems. Pellow did historical studies of waste management, from horse and cart to compactor trucks and dumpsters; and from city dumps, incinerators, reduction plants, and sanitary landfills to materials recovery facilities and the recycling industry. Using case studies and the anthropological method of participant-observation, he supports his findings with facts as well as firsthand experience. Pellow investigates the most vilified waste hauler in

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Brinton et al. studied the relationship between women's education, work, and marriage in three east Asian labor markets: Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea.
Abstract: Tables and figures Acknowledgments 1. Married women's labor in East Asian economies Mary C. Brinton 2. Married women's employment in rapidly industrializing societies: South Korea and Taiwan Mary C. Brinton, Yean-Ju Lee, and William L. Parish 3. Family demands, gender attitudes, and married women's labor force participation: comparing Japan and Taiwan Wei-hsin Yu 4. Women, work, and marriage in three east Asian labor markets: the cases of Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea Yean-Ju Lee and Shuichi Hirata 5. Women's education and the labor market in Japan and South Korea Mary C. Brinton and Sunhwa Lee 6. Women's solidarity: company policies and Japanese office ladies Yuko Ogasawara 7. Mothers as the best teachers: Japanese motherhood and early childhood education Keiko Hirao 8. Women's education, work, and marriage in South Korea Sunhwa Lee 9. Taking informality into account: women's work in the formal and informal sectors in Taiwan Wei-hsin Yu 10. The 'boss's wife' and Taiwanese small familt business Yu-Hsia Lu 11. Daughters, parents, and globalization: the case of Taiwan Nidhi Mehrotra and William L. Parish Notes References Index.