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JournalISSN: 1474-4740

cultural geographies 

SAGE Publishing
About: cultural geographies is an academic journal published by SAGE Publishing. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Cultural geography & Sociology. It has an ISSN identifier of 1474-4740. Over the lifetime, 838 publications have been published receiving 22054 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper surveys the return to materialist concerns in the work of a new generation of cultural geographers informed by their engagements with science and technology studies and performance studies, and by their worldly involvements in the politically charged climate of relations between science and society.
Abstract: This paper surveys the return to materialist concerns in the work of a new generation of cultural geographers informed by their engagements with science and technology studies and performance studies, on the one hand, and by their worldly involvements in the politically charged climate of relations between science and society on the other It argues that these efforts centre on new ways of approaching the vital nexus between the bio (life) and the geo (earth), or the ‘livingness’ of the world, in a context in which the modality of life is politically and technologically molten It identifies some of the major innovations in theory, style and application associated with this work and some of the key challenges that it poses for the practice of cultural geographyThinking is neither a line drawn between subject and object nor a revolving of one around the other Rather thinking takes place in the relationship of territory and earth involving a gradual but thorough displacement from text to territory1

931 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the subjects of such projects, those who enroll in such projects "to bring good food to others", in this case undergraduate majors in Community Studies at the University of California at Santa Cruz who do six-month field studies with such organizations, and show their disappointments when they find these projects lack resonance in the communities in which they are located.
Abstract: Under the banner of food justice, the last few years has seen a profusion of projects focused on selling, donating, bringing or growing fresh fruits and vegetables in neighborhoods inhabited by African Americans – often at below market prices – or educating them to the quality of locally grown, seasonal, and organic food. The focus of this article is the subjects of such projects – those who enroll in such projects ‘to bring good food to others,’ in this case undergraduate majors in Community Studies at the University of California at Santa Cruz who do six-month field studies with such organizations. Drawing on formal and informal communications with me, I show that they are hailed by a set of discourses that reflect whitened cultural histories, such as the value of putting one’s hands in the soil. I show their disappointments when they find these projects lack resonance in the communities in which they are located. I then show how many come to see that current activism reflects white desires more than those of the communities they putatively serve. In this way, the article provides insight into the production and reproduction of whiteness in the alternative food movement, and how it might be disrupted. I conclude that more attention to the cultural politics of alternative food might enable whites to be more effective allies in anti-racist struggles.

574 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a critique of geographical-posthumanist engagements is presented, where the authors identify two Eurocentric performances common in posthumanist geographies and analyze their implications, and conclude with some thoughts about steps to decolonize geo-graphs.
Abstract: This paper engages my struggles to craft geo-graphs or earth writings that also further broaden political goals of decolonizing the discipline of geography. To this end, I address a body of literature roughly termed ‘posthumanism’ because it offers powerful tools to identify and critique dualist constructions of nature and culture that work to uphold Eurocentric knowledge and the colonial present. However, I am discomforted by the ways in which geographical engagements with posthumanism tend to reproduce colonial ways of knowing and being by enacting universalizing claims and, consequently, further subordinating other ontologies. Building from this discomfort, I elaborate a critique of geographical-posthumanist engagements. Taking direction from Indigenous and decolonial theorizing, the paper identifies two Eurocentric performances common in posthumanist geographies and analyzes their implications. I then conclude with some thoughts about steps to decolonize geo-graphs. To this end, I take up learnings of...

492 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, it is argued that the molecularization of life, together with the individualization of risk, has given rise to a new "somatic" self, and a new 'ethopolitical' order in which our biological life has become our life's work.
Abstract: In what ways can it be said of the molecularization of life that it has made our biological existence a political concern in new ways? This essay examines two different answers to this question. The first, exemplified by the work of Nikolas Rose, suggests that the molecularization of life, together with the individualization of risk, has given rise to a new ‘somatic’ self, and a new ‘ethopolitical’ order in which our biological life has becomes our life's work. The second, most evident in growing concern over ‘biosecurity’, posits a vulnerable subject, thrown into an unpredictable molecular world characterized by exchange and circulation and full of ‘emergent’ risks. Whereas the former has arguably led to new forms of governmentality, and new kinds of pastoral power, this paper argues that the latter has been widley taken up as a justification for the global extension of forms of sovereign power whose purpose is to pre-empt certain biological futures in favour of others. An exclusive focus on the former n...

408 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In rural places that sit at the uneasy crossroads between natural resource-based production and new economies and cultures of aesthetic landscape consumption, ideas of landscape become increasingly important and contested.
Abstract: In rural places that sit at the uneasy crossroads between ‘traditional’ natural resource-based production and ‘new’ economies and cultures of aesthetic landscape ‘consumption’, ideas of landscape become increasingly important and contested. This paper examines one such conflict in Nevada County, California - a former mining and ranching community in the Sierra Nevada that has experienced rapid ‘exurban’ in-migration and gentrification. In-migrants brought with them particular ‘aesthetic’ or ‘consumption’ views of landscape that long-time residents with continuing ties to the ‘old’ production landscape viewed as political threats. These tensions have recently ignited a political firestorm over a proposal by the environmentalist-dominated county government to incorporate landscape-scale aesthetic and environmental principles into county planning. The ferocity of this contest reflects the multiple issues at stake, including competition between different forms of rural capitalism, class conflict and social co...

350 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202326
202256
202155
202050
201937
201828