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Showing papers in "cultural geographies in 2008"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the subjects of such projects, those who enroll in such projects "to bring good food to others", in this case undergraduate majors in Community Studies at the University of California at Santa Cruz who do six-month field studies with such organizations, and show their disappointments when they find these projects lack resonance in the communities in which they are located.
Abstract: Under the banner of food justice, the last few years has seen a profusion of projects focused on selling, donating, bringing or growing fresh fruits and vegetables in neighborhoods inhabited by African Americans – often at below market prices – or educating them to the quality of locally grown, seasonal, and organic food. The focus of this article is the subjects of such projects – those who enroll in such projects ‘to bring good food to others,’ in this case undergraduate majors in Community Studies at the University of California at Santa Cruz who do six-month field studies with such organizations. Drawing on formal and informal communications with me, I show that they are hailed by a set of discourses that reflect whitened cultural histories, such as the value of putting one’s hands in the soil. I show their disappointments when they find these projects lack resonance in the communities in which they are located. I then show how many come to see that current activism reflects white desires more than those of the communities they putatively serve. In this way, the article provides insight into the production and reproduction of whiteness in the alternative food movement, and how it might be disrupted. I conclude that more attention to the cultural politics of alternative food might enable whites to be more effective allies in anti-racist struggles.

574 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that aerostatic flight can be understood simultaneously as a technology for moving through atmosphere in a meteorological sense and as an event generative, at least potentially, of atmospheres in an affective sense.
Abstract: How might the dynamic materiality of atmosphere be addressed in ways that register simultaneously its meteorological and affective qualities? The present article considers this question via a discussion of the kinds of atmospheric spaces in which the emergence and experience of modern balloon (or aerostatic) flight is implicated. In doing so it argues that aerostatic flight can be understood simultaneously as a technology for moving through atmosphere in a meteorological sense and as an event generative, at least potentially, of atmospheres in an affective sense. This argument is exemplified via a discussion of a particularly notable instance of balloon flight: the attempt, in 1897 by a Swedish engineer, Salomon August Andree, and two companions, to fly to the North Pole in a hydrogen-filled balloon. Drawing upon a range of contemporaneous accounts, the article makes three claims about the expedition: first, that it can be understood, following Spinoza, as an effort to engineer a mode of addressing the me...

240 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the spectacle of childhood is associated with the rise of ontological insecurity provoked by anxieties around the political, economic, geopolitical, and environmental futures, and lay out three configurations of the child, as accumulation strategy, ornament, and waste.
Abstract: As the 21st century picks up speed and settles into place, childhood has become a spectacle — a site of accumulation, commodification, and desire — in whose name much is done. In this article, I argue that the spectacle of childhood is associated with the rise of ontological insecurity provoked by anxieties around the political—economic, geopolitical, and environmental futures. I address how this spectacle is produced and made sensible, and lay out three configurations of the child — as accumulation strategy, ornament, and waste — that it calls forth. I suggest some of the consequences of these material social practices for actual children and the cultural geographies of their everyday lives. In exploring what is accomplished politically and socially by these cultural forms and material social practices, I draw out their connections with commodification, essence, distraction, and panic.

156 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a series of sites that evoke an absent-presence of working-class life are depicted, including housing estates, old railways, patches of derelict ground and old cinemas.
Abstract: This paper explores the haunted realms of everyday mundane space. Based on the author's journey to work by car, a series of sites that evoke an absent-presence of working-class life are depicted. It is argued that these spaces, including housing estates, old railways, patches of derelict ground and old cinemas, are replete with ghostly effects. Drawing upon the examples provided, the article goes on to examine in more detail these hauntings, focusing upon the sensual, half-recognizable and imaginary qualities that are provoked by absences, vestiges and peculiar recontextualizations. It is contended that such sites are particularly haunted because unlike the more dynamic spaces of regenerated urban space, the past lingers in people, spaces, textures and things and is not so rapidly disposed. The paper concludes by investigating the ambiguities produced by the ghostly absent-presence of the working class, both in lived space and in academic discourse, and evaluates the advantages of spectral indeterminacy.

121 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the mobilization of haunting tropes to make sense of contemporary settler-Indigenous relations reinscribes colonial power relations and fails to account for the specific experiences and claims of Indigenous peoples.
Abstract: This essay considers the politics of describing Indigenous peoples as ghostly or haunting presences. Focusing on the history of haunting tropes in Canadian cultural production and the recent re-emergence of the spectral Indigenous figure in, among other places, a wilderness park in southwestern British Columbia, I argue that the mobilization of haunting tropes to make sense of contemporary settler-Indigenous relations reinscribes colonial power relations and fails to account for the specific experiences and claims of Indigenous peoples. At a time when cultural geographers are contemplating the possibilities of a `spectral turn', this essay asks what politics are involved in deploying a spectro-geographical approach to studies of the colonial and postcolonial.

89 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the artist's Peckham Rock, a fragment of concrete that he surreptitiously stuck to the walls of the British Museum in May 2005, and place the connections and disconnections between a series of elite and institutional spaces, social relations and mediascapes through which ''the rock' passes as its ''life''.
Abstract: This article is about the intersections between contemporary forms of urban inscription, art and the city, as they come to be configured through an emergent `post-graffiti' aesthetic practice. Exemplary of this movement is the self-proclaimed `art terrorist', Banksy, who has earned a reputation recently for his audacious interventions into some of the most significant art institutions in the western world, as well as for his politically charged stencil and sculptural work in the everyday spaces of the city. Focusing on the artist's Peckham Rock, a fragment of concrete that he surreptitiously stuck to the walls of the British Museum in May 2005, this article uses the methodological device of `the journey' in an attempt to place the connections and disconnections between a series of elite and institutional spaces, social relations and mediascapes through which `the rock' passes as its `life' as an artwork unfolds. Existing research, including that by geographers, has examined graffiti in terms of urban iden...

77 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors discuss the meaning and value of ideas of haunting, identifying a number of ways in which it makes analysis productively hesitant and offer a practical guide for locating these awkward moments of hesitancy.
Abstract: Recent work in human geography seems to support Roger Luckhurst's (2002) claim that the humanities and social sciences are undergoing a `spectral turn'. This paper is intended as a contribution to this `turn' and to assist those who might be interested in investigating haunting. It begins by discussing the meaning and value of ideas of haunting, identifying a number of ways in which it makes analysis productively hesitant. Second, since hauntings usually involve attempts to represent the unrepresentable, we would like to offer a practical guide for locating these awkward moments of hesitancy. Drawing upon a number of examples from films, literature and life we will discuss some of the ways in which ghosts may be made manifest, textually and materially. We will conclude by suggesting that in being hesitant and embracing indeterminacy we might open up new and potentially productive apprehensions of haunted spaces and the enchanting energetics that are particular to them

71 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors traces the massive commodification and industrialization of the USA's single most important food: bread and argues that bakers overcame serious obstacles to capitalist development during this period thanks to the construction of contingent and contested associations between industrial bread and larger discourses of purity, hygiene, and progress circulating through turn-of-the-century America.
Abstract: This article traces the massive commodification and industrialization of the USA's single most important food: bread. It argues that bakers overcame serious obstacles to capitalist development during this period thanks to the construction of contingent and contested associations between industrial bread and larger discourses of purity, hygiene, and progress circulating through turn-of-the-century America. It explores two arenas in which this articulation operated: the re-making of baking as a techno-science of expert control and the visual spectacle of streamlined, white loaves. This story, in turn, offers larger lessons about the contradictory politics of food safety in our own time. Building on Michel Foucault's work on bio-politics, it shows how notions of food safety dependent on discourses of purity, contagion, hygiene, and vitality inevitably constitute lines of exclusion and social hierarchy, even as they are used to mobilize `progressive' social change.

56 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors apply transspecies urban theory to the existing literature on urban livestock in the developing world, as well as a case study of chickens in Botswana to demonstrate how cities are inextricably wrapped up in human-animal relations.
Abstract: New cultural animal geography offers conceptual tools for a reinterpretation of urbanization in Africa. This article applies transspecies urban theory to the existing literature on urban livestock in the developing world, as well as a case study of chickens in Botswana to demonstrate how cities are inextricably wrapped up in human—animal relations. A focus on animals as influential actors, and interspecies mingling encourages one to acknowledge that animals are shaped by, and are themselves central actors in the constitution of, urban form, function, and dynamics. Recognition of subaltern `animal towns' challenges the perceived centrality of human existence.

52 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an analysis of political resistance to the construction of subsidized farmworker housing in Woodburn, Oregon between 1991 and 1996 is presented, where the defense of normative whiteness is explored.
Abstract: Through an analysis of political resistance to the construction of subsidized farmworker housing in Woodburn, Oregon between 1991 and 1996, this article explores the defense of normative whiteness ...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the history of youth camp development in Germany and the United States during the interwar period, arguing not only that such camps played a crucial role in the ways in which national societies dealt with their youth, but also that their history forces us to rethink relations between place-making, nationhood and modern governing.
Abstract: Focusing on youth camp development in Germany and the United States during the interwar period, this article argues not only that such camps played a crucial role in the ways in which national societies dealt with their youth, but also that their history forces us to rethink relations between place-making, nationhood, and modern governing. First, the article addresses the historiography of youth movements in relation to current debates about spatiality, nationalism, and governmentality. The main part of the article examines organized camps, in particular by the German Bunde, the Hitlerjugend (Hitler Youth), and the American Boy Scouts, focusing on their transition from relatively spontaneous activities of particular social movements, to objects of professional design, national-scale planning and intricate management in the interwar period. This development demonstrates how in the seemingly trivial activity of camping, nationalism is interwoven with the project of conducting youth through contact with natu...

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The paper considers the writings of Mary Butts (1890—1937) to explore a geography of ghosts. After examining earlier geographical engagements with the spectral and magical, and outlining the terms of recent scholarly debate concerning spectrality, the paper introduces Butts' life and work, focussing on her ghostly writings in stories, novels, journals, autobiography and an essay on the supernatural in fiction. Butts' discussion of magic and place, and her accounts of the landscapes of Dorset and west Cornwall, demonstrate a version of spectral landscape conveying enchantment, secret meaning and a culturally select geography. The paper concludes by considering Butts in relation to current discussions of spectral geography.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Maddern, J. F. as mentioned in this paper, et al. (2008). Spectres of Migration and the Ghosts of Ellis Island. Journal of Cultural Geography, 15 (3), 359-381
Abstract: Maddern, J. F. (2008). Spectres of Migration and the Ghosts of Ellis Island. Journal of Cultural Geography, 15 (3), 359-381

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A bronze monument to Nannita R.H. Daisey, petticoat flying, riding on a cowcatcher, was proposed by the city of Edmond.
Abstract: On 22 April 1889, at the beginning of the first Oklahoma land run when the US federal government allowed non-Indian settlers to claim what had been Native American lands, Nannita R.H. Daisey entered the newly opened territory by train to become one of the very first women to stake a quarter-section land claim, on land today part of Edmond. According to local lore, Daisy leapt from the cowcatcher of the train to stake her claim, removing her petticoat to mark the spot. Over 100 years later Edmond has proposed a bronze monument to Daisey, petticoat flying, riding on the cowcatcher, in an effort both to attract tourists with public art, and to recognize women's contributions to Oklahoma settlement. On the surface this seems a laudable attempt to re-inscribe women's lives in the history of the American West, the social memories of Oklahomans, and the landscape of contemporary Edmond — except that the story about the cowcatcher and the petticoat, though passed down in local lore for more than 100 years, is fal...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors take the subject of the rise of racial discourse in the 19th century as a focus for extending critical race theory (CRT) in Cultural and Historical Geography, and pursues a critique be...
Abstract: This article takes the subject of the rise of racial discourse in the 19th century as a focus for extending critical race theory (CRT) in Cultural and Historical Geography. It pursues a critique be...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors evaluate the role of this kind of horizontal cooperation in a world which is increasingly dominated by global flux and complex interactions between multi-level stakeholders and show the quantitative importance of partnerships built upon the celebration of attributes and values associated with mountains.
Abstract: This article analyses transnational partnerships set up between Swiss mountain municipalities and other mountain communities throughout the world. It seeks to evaluate the role of this kind of horizontal cooperation in a world which is increasingly dominated by global flux and complex interactions between multi- level stakeholders. A review of these partnerships shows the quantitative importance of partnerships built upon the celebration of attributes and values associated with mountains. Beyond the very great diversity in the types of partnership and their objectives, the partnerships are surprisingly capable of combining cultural, political and economic objectives, and of bringing together local objectives, national imagination, federal policies and intergovernmental priorities.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine how a corporate museum in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia works to create proleptic myths of nationhood to undergird a broader state-centric project of nationalist modernization.
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to understand how a corporate museum in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia works to create proleptic myths of nationhood to under-gird a broader state-centric project of nationalist—capitalist modernization. The article examines how these myths are expressed in the museum's design plans and are manifested in the museum's displays and spatial layout. From this analysis it becomes apparent that, first, the museum's designers intend for Malaysian museum-goers to both learn and embody particular myths of national modernization. Second, the museum's displays are dedicated to establishing a Malay-centric origin narrative for the contemporary nation-state. Third, as one moves through the museum, Malay-centrism gives way to narratives of a `multi-racial' society that link technological modernization with social progress. Eventually, however, `race' is trumped by `class' as the social identity category deemed appropriate for `information age' citizenship and nationhood in Malaysia in a story tha...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the process by which the cultural history of Royal Palm Hammock, the most visited site within Everglades National Park, Florida, informs the landscape's natural history.
Abstract: This article explores the process by which the cultural history of Royal Palm Hammock, the most visited site within Everglades National Park, Florida, informs the landscape's natural history. To understand this process, I analyze the scientific literature, including naturalists' fieldwork reports, surveys, fieldnotes and other archival material spanning the late 1800s to the mid-1930s, as well as ethnographic interviews conducted with local Everglades hunters who depended upon this landscape during the latter part of this era. As I demonstrate, local people, serving as guides and informants, critically contributed to the production of ecological knowledge about Royal Palm Hammock, though the evidence of these contributions has been distorted by the natural history literature's negative stereotypes of local landscape practices.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a study of Madipur widow colony in west Delhi, built as part of the UN International Year of Shelter for the Homeless in 1987, is presented, where a particular set of "spatial opportunities" built into the widow colony are manipulated and seized upon by the participants to produce an uneven geography of architecture and empowerment.
Abstract: This paper is based on a study of Madipur widow colony in west Delhi, built as part of the UN International Year of Shelter for the Homeless in 1987. Designed to accommodate widows from squatter settlements in Delhi, very few of the original houses now survive and very few of the original owners remain. The spatial stories of the participants suggest how and why and under what circumstances, a State’s visions of empowerment as translated into utopian architectural projects are transformed by the people who inhabit them, in their attempts to reshape themselves and their spaces. They illustrate how a particular set of ‘spatial opportunities’ built into the widow colony are manipulated and seized upon by the participants to produce an uneven geography of architecture and empowerment. This paper thus extends the important work on critical geographies of architecture, to the architecture of low-income housing in the global South.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of the history and philosophy of science at the University of Cambridge, focusing on the role of history in science and technology in science research.
Abstract: Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge - (Davis, Sophia)

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper traced the symbolic transformations of the tamale from its existence in the street life of the late 19th century US to the nationwide advertising campaign initiated by the Armour Packing Company in 1898.
Abstract: This article explores how the tamale entered the national market as a mass-produced foodstuff at the end of 19th century. Closely reading advertising images, the article examines how the Armour Packing Company placed their chicken tamale in relation to imaginative geographies of Mexico from this era. Through tracing the symbolic transformations of the tamale from its existence in the street life of the late 19th century US to the nation-wide advertising campaign initiated by the Armour Packing Company in 1898, this article will highlight some of the shifting meanings of the tamale as seen in American travel literature, novels, and popular magazines of the time. That the marketing and symbolic transformation of the tamale in advertising coincide with the escalation and development of the Spanish-American War, American imperialism, and changing notions of race and place in this era has particular implication for the geographies of knowledge associated with ethnic foods and has wider import for the construct...


Journal Article

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A sculpture of a snake swallowing its own tail made from interlocking plastic jerry cans used to carry water and fuel was exhibited at the V&A Museum from February to June 2007 as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Standing before me, a giant serpent casts a dark shadow in the bright summer day. It is a sculpture of a snake swallowing its own tail made from interlocking plastic jerry cans used to carry water and fuel. DAN-AYIDO-HOUEDO/Arc-en-ciel, symbole de perpétuité (Figure 1) is the creation of Benin-born experimental sculptor, Romuald Hazoumé, who has created artworks from salvaged industrial materials since the mid 1980s. Specially commissioned for the Victoria and Albert (V&A) Museum’s exhibition, ‘Uncomfortable truths: the shadow of slave trading on contemporary art and design’, the sculpture stood in the centre of the London museum’s John Madejski Garden from February to June 2007. DAN-AYIDO-HOUEDO is an ouroboros assembled from fragments of the modern world and symbolizes the cycle of poverty faced by many in Africa.1 As part of an exhibition on the legacies of the Atlantic slave trade, it evokes other meanings for me: the ‘cosmic clockwise gyro’ of winds and currents circling the Sargasso Sea; the ‘triangular trade’ in commodities and people-as-commodities connecting Europe, Africa and the Americas; the creation and destruction wrought by the slave trade and the plantations it supplied; the return of the past and the haunting of the present by the memories and legacies of Atlantic slavery.2 The V&A’s exhibition was one of many commemorative events to mark the bicentenary of the British Abolition of the Slave Trade Act in 2007. Owing, at least in part, to a cluster of insistent, troubling anniversaries – also including the 2008 bicentenary of the outlawing of the African

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In Home as mentioned in this paper, Blunt and Dowling creatively argue that home must be considered as both a spatial imaginary (the relations between feelings, attachment, and dwelling) as well as a political space of negotiation and contestation.
Abstract: In Home (2006), Blunt and Dowling creatively argue that home must be considered as both a spatial imaginary (the relations between feelings, attachment, and dwelling) as well as a political space of negotiation and contestation. The book begins with a contemporary, largely western conceptualization of the home and moves to outline multiple avenues for exploring a critical geography where home is conceptualized as the multi-scalar, material and imaginative site in and through which power and identity intersect with, disrupt, and extend common understandings of home. While comparative cultural geographies of home are limited here, the resulting book is a solid reference piece that persistently requires a flexible reader willing to extend their own imaginations of home along the journey. As such, reading it becomes a series of engaged moments between authors and reader in which a truly critical geography finds expression. The historical dimensions of home, through which we have come to understand what home does, should, and could mean, is best found in Chapter 2: Representing Home; and Chapter 4: Home, Nation and Empire. Missing, however, is a temporal dimension more closely connected to the everyday lived enactments, experiences, and expressions of home: the time-specific particularities of the meanings of home. While space is critical to appreciating the ‘fluidity of home as a concept, metaphor and lived experience’ (p. 21), I suggest that political, social, and cultural processes are disrupting the linearity of home as well. That is, the meanings and attachments of home for single couples; young families; families with teens; empty-nesters; and returnees – home across the life course – suggest that home is indeed dynamic, but both flexible and durable. While a sense of time is introduced in a section on ethnographic research, it is not developed more substantially (pp. 43–4). Thinking about the home across the life course is one approach to incorporate social processes and rites of passage that reorient the material and imaginary home. Rethinking home across the course of one day, the differences in social relations and expectations during the week compared to the weekend, or between the everyday and the celebratory moments might further disrupt the normative and static notions of home. In these temporal frameworks, a deeper understanding of parental control, boundaries and territories of ‘adult’ space versus ‘child’ spaces, and the constant renegotiation of norms, expectations, and power relations might be more critically analyzed. That I can pose these questions without undermining the integrity of the book’s argument suggests that Blunt and Dowling have succeeded in producing, not only a geography of the home, but also a framework and approach for a sustained critical geography of the home.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Publics and the city as mentioned in this paper is a good introduction to the public space debate in Australia, focusing on issues of aboriginal rights, youth countercultural expression, sexual citizenship and the gendering of space.
Abstract: 525 forms of publicness that others may not share. This underlines that when talking about public space, geographers are always and inevitably working with a specific notion of what the public city is – one that may or may not resonate with the concerns of others who are engaged in struggles for the city. Iveson’s book hence moves the debate on public space forward in a significant manner and will certainly be of interest to all geographers and urbanists for whom the life of the street holds fascination. Even those who find debates on public space somewhat arid should enjoy this book’s lively range of examples. Drawn from across Australia, the case studies that Iveson presents are carefully nuanced and engage critically with ongoing debates in social and cultural geography about the making of gender, racial, age and sexual identities. Issues of aboriginal rights, youth countercultural expression, sexual citizenship and the gendering of space are flagged up by the varied case study chapters, meaning that there are multiple points of entry for those for whom public space per se is not a prime concern. This given, Iveson clearly demonstrates why issues of publicness should be of concern to all geographers, and he suggests that there is too much at stake to accept existing normative assumptions about the decline of the public sphere. Provocative and passionate, the fact that the book is laced with humour will also surely endear it to a student audience. For such reasons, Publics and the city is highly recommended both as a primer on public space as well as a state of the art intervention in debates on the ‘struggle for space’.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In Home as mentioned in this paper, Blunt and Dowling creatively argue that home must be considered as both a spatial imaginary (the relations between feelings, attachment, and dwelling) as well as a political space of negotiation and contestation.
Abstract: In Home (2006), Blunt and Dowling creatively argue that home must be considered as both a spatial imaginary (the relations between feelings, attachment, and dwelling) as well as a political space of negotiation and contestation. The book begins with a contemporary, largely western conceptualization of the home and moves to outline multiple avenues for exploring a critical geography where home is conceptualized as the multi-scalar, material and imaginative site in and through which power and identity intersect with, disrupt, and extend common understandings of home. While comparative cultural geographies of home are limited here, the resulting book is a solid reference piece that persistently requires a flexible reader willing to extend their own imaginations of home along the journey. As such, reading it becomes a series of engaged moments between authors and reader in which a truly critical geography finds expression. The historical dimensions of home, through which we have come to understand what home does, should, and could mean, is best found in Chapter 2: Representing Home; and Chapter 4: Home, Nation and Empire. Missing, however, is a temporal dimension more closely connected to the everyday lived enactments, experiences, and expressions of home: the time-specific particularities of the meanings of home. While space is critical to appreciating the ‘fluidity of home as a concept, metaphor and lived experience’ (p. 21), I suggest that political, social, and cultural processes are disrupting the linearity of home as well. That is, the meanings and attachments of home for single couples; young families; families with teens; empty-nesters; and returnees – home across the life course – suggest that home is indeed dynamic, but both flexible and durable. While a sense of time is introduced in a section on ethnographic research, it is not developed more substantially (pp. 43–4). Thinking about the home across the life course is one approach to incorporate social processes and rites of passage that reorient the material and imaginary home. Rethinking home across the course of one day, the differences in social relations and expectations during the week compared to the weekend, or between the everyday and the celebratory moments might further disrupt the normative and static notions of home. In these temporal frameworks, a deeper understanding of parental control, boundaries and territories of ‘adult’ space versus ‘child’ spaces, and the constant renegotiation of norms, expectations, and power relations might be more critically analyzed. That I can pose these questions without undermining the integrity of the book’s argument suggests that Blunt and Dowling have succeeded in producing, not only a geography of the home, but also a framework and approach for a sustained critical geography of the home.