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JournalISSN: 1034-5329

Current Issues in Criminal Justice 

Taylor & Francis
About: Current Issues in Criminal Justice is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Criminal justice & Prison. It has an ISSN identifier of 1034-5329. Over the lifetime, 964 publications have been published receiving 8636 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 1996, the Wood Royal Commission sought evidence about the existence of organised paedophilia in New South Wales (Wood 1997) and found that Australian tourists were travelling overseas for the purpose of having sex with children as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: !. n~mber of events in recent years have placed the issue of commercial sexual exploitation of children high on the public agenda. Evidence that Australian tourists were travelling overseas for the purpose of having sex with children produced widespread public debate, and resulted in the Crimes (Child Sex Tourism) Amendment Act 1994 (Cth). In 1996, the Wood Royal Commission sought evidence about the existence of organised paedophilia in New South Wales (Wood 1997).

171 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Poynting and Collins as discussed by the authors described Bin Laden in the Suburbs: Criminalising the Arab Other, which is a book about bin Laden's life in the Sydney suburbs.
Abstract: (2005). Bin Laden in the Suburbs: Criminalising the Arab Other, Scott Poynting, Greg Noble, Paul Tabar and Jock Collins, Sydney, Institute of Criminology Series, 2004. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 314-317.

136 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The dominant notion of forensic science as a patchwork of disciplines primarily assisting the criminal justice system (defined as "forensics" in this article) is in crisis, or at least shows a...
Abstract: The dominant conception of forensic science as a patchwork of disciplines primarily assisting the criminal justice system (defined as ‘forensics’ in this article) is in crisis, or at least shows a ...

108 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The paper presented by Weatherburn, Fitzgerald and Hua and the research commissioned by the Equal Opportunity Commissioner of Victoria mainly criticise scholarly explanations of the over-representation of Indigenous people in the criminal justice system as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The paper presented by Weatherburn, Fitzgerald and Hua and the research commissioned by the Equal Opportunity Commissioner of Victoria mainly criticise scholarly explanations of the over-representation of Indigenous people in the criminal justice system. The study of racism in the criminal justice system is important for human rights irrespective of whether it has any connection to explaining the over-representation of Indigenous people.

105 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors reflect critically on these imposed approaches in Australia and New South Wales (NSW) as they apply to women and bring suggestions from the ground up, using new work on the expressed needs and experiences of Aboriginal women prisoners, as well as other work on women being released from prison in Australia.
Abstract: Over the past twenty years there has been significant development in theories and perspectives driving post-release (re-entry) approaches and work. On the whole, as with most other criminal justice theories and frameworks, these have been informed by the male experience of prison and release and have been imported to the Australian context largely from the United Kingdom and North America. These theoretical frames, like desistance, and approaches like throughcare and addressing criminogenic needs are then imposed upon women's transitional, post-release lives. These generalised approaches also, almost entirely, ignore the majority of women prisoners because they do not address very short sentence and remand prisoners; the large number of women with combined and multiple mental health and substance abuse disorders and cognitive disability; or the marginal space from which most come and to which most return. This article reflects critically on these imposed approaches in Australia and New South Wales (NSW) as they apply to women and brings suggestions from the ground up, using new work on the expressed needs and experiences of Aboriginal women prisoners, as well as other work on women being released from prison in Australia.

102 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202323
202230
202145
202031
201934
201813