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Showing papers in "Current Issues in Criminal Justice in 2000"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider the threats that face older persons in terms of their vulnerability to acts of fraud and financial abuse, and present prevention and control strategies that include legislation, law enforcement, education and information, and enhanced reporting.
Abstract: Consideration is given to the threats that face older persons in terms of their vulnerability to acts of fraud and financial abuse. The development of new technologies for purchasing goods and services creates potential for fraud, as do traditional areas in health care, accommodation services and investment services. Smith lists prevention and control strategies that include legislation, law enforcement, education and information, and enhanced reporting.

34 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focused on the status of women in Australia policing in terms of aggregate level data, and the concern is with numerical outcomes and the diagnostic potential of such an approach.
Abstract: Background This study is focused on the status of women in Australia policing in terms of aggregate level data. That is, the concern is with numerical outcomes and the diagnostic potential of such an approach. The premise is that numerical gender equality is desirable across policing functions. This is assumed on social justice principles, in terms of the equal performance capacity of women, and with reference to a right of access to female police officers by female offenders and female victims of crime. In terms of pressing concerns about police behaviour, there is also an argument that may be considered regarding the likelihood that women police will be less confrontational in dealing with the public, and less prone to abuse their power (Brereton 1999). However, as a rationale for employing more women, this arguably will be less significant than equal employment opportunity (EEO) imperatives. There is also an assumption in this paper about the legitimacy of some forms of 'unequal treatment' or affirmative action to improve the position of groups, such as women, who have a history of marginalisation. The research behind these premises is well established and therefore will not be developed here. Questions of equal treatment and affirmative action are covered in the general literature

25 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Mark Finnane1
TL;DR: In this paper, police unions in Australia: a history of the present are discussed and a discussion of the role of unions in criminal justice in Australia is presented. But this paper is limited to three categories:
Abstract: (2000). Police Unions in Australia: a History of the Present. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 5-19.

19 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For almost two decades, official sentencing inquiries in Australia have examined a rational case for structuring or guiding sentencing discretion (ALRC 1980a, Victorian Sentencing Committee 1988, ALRC 1988, NSWLRC 1996a & b).
Abstract: For almost two decades, official sentencing inquiries in Australia have examined a rational case for structuring or guiding sentencing discretion (ALRC 1980a; Victorian Sentencing Committee 1988; ALRC 1988; NSWLRC 1996a & b). Public confusion and resentment about the gap between sentences announced and sentences served, apparent disparity in the treatment of similar offences committed by similarly circumstanced offenders and the just deserts theory with its emphasis on consistency and fairness, were all influential in these inquiries.

17 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Home detention has been introduced in a political climate of tough law and order campaigns and its emergence relates to discussions about changes and contradictions in the overriding philosophy of punishment as mentioned in this paper, and the principal basis for the introduction of home detention is to alleviate the growing cost of imprisonment.
Abstract: Home Detention schemes have become available in some western jurisdictions over the past two decades. The advent of detention in the home arises with the development of electronic surveillance techniques and coincides with increasing rates of incarceration. The principal basis for the introduction of home detention is to alleviate the growing cost of imprisonment. Home detention has been introduced in a political climate of tough law and order campaigns and its emergence relates to discussions about changes and contradictions in the overriding philosophy of punishment.

16 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors integrate knowledge on the vulnerability of Aboriginal interviewees with research findings on investigative interviewing and eyewitness memory to offer practical guidelines for interviewing Aboriginal people The aim of these guidelines is to maximise the reliability and relevance of the evidence obtained when interviewing Aboriginal individuals.
Abstract: This paper integrates knowledge on the vulnerability of Aboriginal interviewees with research findings on investigative interviewing and eyewitness memory to offer practical guidelines for interviewing Aboriginal people The aim of these guidelines is to maximise the reliability and relevance of the evidence obtained when interviewing Aboriginal people A simple, flexible interview protocol is offered which consists of several key stages: (i) rapport and initial assessment, (ii) an explanation of the purpose, routines and ground rules of the interview, (iii) the elicitation of a free narrative about the alleged offence, (iv) the use of questions to elicit specific details about the offence, and (v) closure of the interview A rationale for each of the recommendations is outlined with reference to the relevant legal, linguistic, anthropological and eyewitness memory literature where appropriate

13 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a survey of developments in Australian Drug Law Enforcement: Taking Stock, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 257-272, with a focus on Australian drug law enforcement.
Abstract: (2000). Developments in Australian Drug Law Enforcement: Taking Stock. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 257-272.

11 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Mirko Bagaric1
TL;DR: Proportionality in Sentencing: its Justification, Meaning and Role as mentioned in this paper is a seminal work in the area of proportionality in criminal justice, focusing on the criminal justice system.
Abstract: (2000). Proportionality in Sentencing: its Justification, Meaning and Role. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 143-165.

11 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that contemporary American culture has a tendency to stimulate panics about lesser matters, such as crime problems in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom, and that countries with lesser crime problems watch American television shows, read American books, see American politicians, and seem all too frequently to develop an American desire to panic about crime.
Abstract: Criminologists generally accept that ideologies of crime control are constructed (and packaged) for both domestic and export markets (Cohen 1972; Israel1997). Americans, of course, have played a key part in this trade. However, the export of American fears of crime has been a less recognized phenomenon. In this short paper, we argue that contemporary American culture has a tendency to stimulate panics about lesser matters. In following the American lead, not only are Australians scared about problems that may not exist in Australia, but many are scared about problems that barely exist in America. Countries with lesser crime problems, such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom watch American television shows, read American books, see American politicians, and seem all too frequently to develop an American desire to panic about crime

11 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A case study into the reasons why local residents in Conville, an outer-western suburb of Townsville, formed vigilante groups in order to combat crime which they perceived emanated from Indigenous juveniles is presented in this paper.
Abstract: Case study into the reasons why local residents in Conville, an outer-western suburb of Townsville, formed vigilante groups in order to combat crime which they perceived emanated from Indigenous juveniles - the influence of questionable local folk knowledge which saw Aborigines as the cause of social disorder - the construction of Indigenous people as a 'problem'.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There are a number of stories about crime and control in our cities as discussed by the authors, one familiar story, made more so in last year's State election, is that there is a running 'fight against street crime' being fought in urban Australia,3 necessitating increased police powers over public space.
Abstract: There are a number of stories told about crime and control in our cities. One familiar story, made more so in last year's State election, is that there is a running 'fight against street crime' being fought in urban Australia,3 necessitating increased police powers over public space. Another is told in the enthusiasm for crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), and particularly the claim that it is possible, or indeed necessary, to manipulate the built environment of a place to prevent deviance (Geason & Wilson 1989). More generally, the wonders of the 'Living City' are being rediscovered by governments, planners and wealthy urbanites;5 meanwhile, the story of the dramatic restructuring of capital and the increasing inequality between places and populations, continues to unfold.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Revisiting Excessive Self-Defence: Revisiting Self-defence Revisited Excessive self-defense: Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 39-57.
Abstract: (2000). Revisiting Excessive Self-Defence. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 39-57.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the role of information technology in economic crime becomes organized and when economic crime is organized, the role and role of technology in this process is discussed. A case study is presented.
Abstract: (2000). When Economic Crime Becomes Organised: The Role Of Information Technologies. A Case Study. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 343-348.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the dead victim, the family victim and victim impact statements in New South Wales are discussed and discussed in the context of criminal justice in the state of NSW, Australia.
Abstract: (2000). The Dead Victim, The Family Victim And Victim Impact Statements In New South Wales. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 292-307.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A number of recent major evaluations rate crime prevention initiatives according to either their ability to provide strong evidence of effects, or their economic cost benefits (see Chisholm 2000, Greenwood 1999, Goldblatt & Lewis 1998, Poyner 1993, Sherman et al 1997, Welsh & Farrington 1999) as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: A number of recent major evaluations rate crime prevention initiatives according to either their ability to provide strong evidence of effects, or their economic cost benefits (see Chisholm 2000; Greenwood 1999; Goldblatt & Lewis 1998; Poyner 1993; Sherman et al 1997; Welsh & Farrington 1999). This imperative has arisen due to the political and economic demand to demonstrate the viability and value of investing in crime prevention (i.e. situational, social or developmental strategies) as compared to traditional criminal justice responses (i.e. police and prisons). A laudable aim of these evaluations has been to establish evidence based on 'what works' principles that provide a basis for crime prevention policy and practice, contributing to the develo~ment of a 'prevention science' (Coie et al 1993; Goldblatt & Lewis 1998; Hawkins 1999) .

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a way of thinking about how we might compose such melodies in those undefined spaces beyond the limits of 'present reality' is proposed. But this approach is not about drafting (exclusive) limits around what can be classed as real, but with developing genres of critique that forever gesture towards possible alternatives.
Abstract: Gazing across the heterogeneous discourses claiming the rubric of criminology, a casual observer will likely be struck by pervasive discussions aimed at solving the 'crime problem'. Alongside the blaring choruses of technical experts one finds the hushed muses of sceptics and critics. They worry that all the noise is shoring up the very 'reality' that criminologists profess to eradicate (e.g. Christie 1993). Without firm attachments to realist notions of 'crime,' the technically-driven choir would have to sing the lines of a very different melody. What follows contemplates a way of thinking about how we might compose such melodies in those undefined spaces beyond the limits of 'present reality.' It draws inspiration from an allegiance to critical searches for the possible; not from an obsession with describing, in evermore detail, the fugitive 'realities' cf 'crime'. So, as its title suggests, this undertaking is not about drafting (exclusive) limits around what can be classed as real, but with developing genres of critique that forever gesture towards possible alternatives.

Journal ArticleDOI
Mark Israel1
TL;DR: In this paper, what works with South Australian Newspapers? Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 227-232, with a focus on South Australian newspapers.
Abstract: (2000). ‘What Works’ with South Australian Newspapers? Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 227-232.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Aboriginal self-determination: Fine Words and Crocodile Tears? Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 349-354.
Abstract: (2000). Aboriginal Self-determination: ‘Fine Words and Crocodile Tears’? Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 349-354.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an analysis of Prisoner Attitudes to Rape is presented, focusing on the Manipulable Mores (mores) of the criminal justice system and its effect on women.
Abstract: (2000). Manipulable mores: an Analysis of Prisoner Attitudes to Rape. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 198-206.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Australian Youth Subcultures as discussed by the authors is a collection of twenty two essays on various aspects of contemporary youth subcultures in Australia, including skateboarders, street machiners, hip hop, techno or how the Spice Girls were created.
Abstract: Australian Youth Subcultures is a collection of twenty two essays on various aspects of contemporary youth subcultures in Australia. The collection works on a number of levels. First, it is a compendium of constantly changing youth subcultures. The descriptive detail is interesting in itself, particularly for those of us increasingly removed from the multiple meanings and symbols of youth style. Need to know something about skateboarders, street machiners, hip hop, techno or how the Spice Girls were created?

Journal ArticleDOI
Rob White1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors define bias crimes as those in which the motivation for criminal activity is driven by bigotry on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, national origin, sexual orientation and, in certain instances, gender.
Abstract: Frederick Lawrence asserts that a society dedicated to equality must treat bias crimes differently from other crimes, and must enhance the punishment of such crimes. 'Bias' crimes are defined as those in which the motivation for criminal activity is driven by bigotry on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, national origin, sexual orientation and, in certain instances, gender. In legal terms, two models of bias crime statutes are distinguished. The 'racial animus' model requires that the defendant has acted out of hatred for the victim's racial group or the victim for being a member of that group. The 'discriminatory selection' model requires that the defendant has selected their victim because of the victim's membership in a particular group. The common thread in these definitions is the 'state of mind' of the bias criminal.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The New South Wales Drug Summit, held over the week 17 to 21 May 1999 at the instigation of NSW Premier Bob Carr, represents something of a watershed in the debate over the appropriate nature of public policy on illicit drugs in Australia as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The New South Wales Drug Summit, held over the week 17 to 21 May 1999 at the instigation of NSW Premier Bob Carr, represents something of a watershed in the debate over the appropriate nature of public policy on illicit drugs in Australia. Not only did this Summit endorse the 'centrality' of the current National Drug Strategic Framework 19981999 to 2002-2003Building Partnerships, but it also advanced 20 'principles' and 172 'recommendations' aimed at strengthening and extending existing policy (NSW Drug Summit Communique 1999). Commenting on the significance of the Summit, Wodak and Baume ( 1999: 12) have argued that 'the effects of the five-day Summit may well last for years, and it will take years before we will know if the Summit was successful, a success that (if it comes) will be measured in declining drug use, deaths, disease, crime and corruption'.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, why a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) is used in South Africa, and some comments on the South African model and possible lessons for Australia.
Abstract: (2000). Why a Truth and Reconciliation Commission? Some comments on the South African model and possible lessons for Australia. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 114-122.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Mark Findlay as discussed by the authors, The Globalisation of Crime: Understanding Transitional Relationships in Context, Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 129-131, 2000.
Abstract: (2000). Mark Findlay, The Globalisation of Crime. Understanding Transitional Relationships in Context. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 129-131.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The implications of the Macpherson report into the death of Stephen Lawrence are discussed in this article, with a focus on the role of race relations in the case of criminal justice.
Abstract: (2000). The Implications of the Macpherson Report Into the Death of Stephen Lawrence. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 106-113.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Dorne et al. as mentioned in this paper presented a primer in history, public policy, and research on child maltreatment, focusing on the history and public policy of maltreatment in criminal justice.
Abstract: (2000). Clifford K. Dorne (1997) Child maltreatment: A primer in history, public policy, and research. Current Issues in Criminal Justice: Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 132-133.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For example, the authors pointed out that deviance, justice and social order are themes which regularly, indeed unremittingly, appear before us in daily popular cultural manifestations, and that it is impossible to ignore the seeming predominance of representations of the world of law and order in popular culture.
Abstract: If you are, as I am, a regular consumer of popular culture, it is impossible to ignore the seeming predominance of representations of the world oflaw and order in the various media which shape and inform our lives. As the editors and contributors to the collection of essays found in the work under review here might prefer to put it, 'deviance, justice and social order' are themes which regularly, indeed unremittingly, appear before us in daily popular cultural manifestations.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In recent times elderly residents of inner city Sydney have been portrayed on television and in newspapers as victims in a wave of violent crime as mentioned in this paper, which led to a perception of increased fear of crime in the area.
Abstract: In recent times elderly residents of inner city Sydney have been portrayed on television and in newspapers as victims in a wave of violent crime. In 1998 media attention escalated following a series of assaults on elderly women in the Redfern, Waterloo, and Alexandria areas. The media became an avenue used by the Police to warn and educate elderly residents on how best to stay safe, as well as inform them of police activity in the area (Kennedy 1998). The increased media coverage also led to a perception of increased fear of crime in the area. Specific locations around public housing estates and recognised 'trouble spots' were targeted by electronic and print media in search of a story.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the early 1980s, I was asked to introduce a plenary speaker, Walter DeKeseredy from Carleton, who was an excellent scholar with a social conscience and a sense of humour as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: At a legal conference in the early 1980s, I was asked to introduce a plenary speaker, Walter DeKeseredy from Carleton. To the excruciating embarrassment of most everyone in the room, I repeatedly mangled the pronunciation of his last name ('Deckerdy,' 'Decksedy,' 'Deckeresedy'). I was mortified, but it didn't seem to bother Walter at all. He just smiled and delivered a great talk, revealing himself as a focused man, an excellent scholar with a social conscience and a sense of humour, who is unfailingly collegial.