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JournalISSN: 0300-4430

Early Child Development and Care 

Taylor & Francis
About: Early Child Development and Care is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Early childhood education & Early childhood. It has an ISSN identifier of 0300-4430. Over the lifetime, 4350 publications have been published receiving 54733 citations. The journal is also known as: E.C.D.C. & ECDC.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The importance of listening to children's perspectives has been emphasised in a wide range of recent research, using a variety of strategies, such as drawing as a strategy to engage with young children around the topic of starting school.
Abstract: The importance of listening to children’s perspectives has been emphasised in a wide range of recent research, using a variety of strategies. This paper explores the use of drawing as a strategy to engage with young children around the topic of starting school. It describes the approaches we have used, examines the benefits and challenges we have encountered and discusses implications of using drawings as a strategy for engaging with young children (aged 4–6 years) in research.

390 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper found that the interaction patterns among parents and children, the amount of literacy events that occur inside the family as well as the values and attitudes towards literacy are mainly responsible for children's later academic achievement.
Abstract: Research on the nature of home literacy experiences point out that such experiences are more embedded in family social events than reading and writing itself. Studies on the social and cultural differences among families indicate that the interaction patterns among parents and children, the amount of literacy events that occur inside the family as well as the values and attitudes towards literacy are mainly responsible for children's later academic achievement. Suggestions are being made on how early childhood setting can build bridges between home and school for achieving the utmost of young children's literacy development.

382 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an international review of literature and practice concerning listening to and consulting with young children in early childhood institutions is presented, including traditional research methods and participatory approaches, focusing on children over five years old.
Abstract: This paper sets out an international review of literature and practice concerning listening to and consulting with young children in early childhood institutions. Most of the existing literature on children's participation has focused on children over five years old; however, a small number of studies have been undertaken with young children. Beginning with an examination of understandings of listening, the paper describes methodologies for gathering young children's perspectives, including traditional research methods and participatory approaches. Key themes will be described which have emerged from studies undertaken to date. Illustrative case studies undertaken as part of the review are used to support the limited published material in this field. The paper raises issues for policy, research and practice concerning the implications of listening to young children.

379 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The recent foundation of a Young Children's Perspectives (YCP) special interest group in the European Early Childhood Education Research Association (EECERA) reflects a general move in social research towards the respectful and inclusive involvement of children in the research process as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The recent foundation of a ‘Young Children’s Perspectives’ special interest group in the European Early Childhood Education Research Association (EECERA) reflects a general move in social research towards the respectful and inclusive involvement of children in the research process. However, established education research guidelines often provide no more than a loose ethical framework, appearing to focus on avoiding poor ethical conduct rather than proposing ways forward for making children’s participation in research a positive experience. This short paper draws on my own experiences of conducting ESRC-funded ethnographic video case studies on the ways four 3-year-old children express their understandings at home and in a pre-school playgroup during their first year of early years education. The paper reflects on the processes of negotiating initial and on-going consent, problematises the notion of ‘informed’ consent in exploratory research with young children, and considers questions of anonymity when collecting and reporting on visual data. The paper proposes that by adopting a flexible, reflective stance, early years researchers can learn much from children not only about their perspectives, but also about how to include young children in the research process.

320 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the concurrent and logitudinal connections between multiple components of the home environment and indicators of preschool-aged children's literacy and language development were examined, finding that parent literacy habits were positively associated with parental reading beliefs.
Abstract: This paper reports on a study that examined both the concurrent and logitudinal connections between multiple components of the home environment and indicators of preschool‐aged children’s literacy and language development. Data were collected from 85 parents and their children at two different times. Results of structural path models indicated that (a) parental literacy habits were positively associated with parental reading beliefs, (b) parental reading beliefs were positively associated with parent–child literacy and language activities in the home, and (c) parent–child literacy and language activities were positively associated with children’s print knowledge and reading interest. Parental demographic characteristics were associated with children’s expressive and receptive language skills. The results highlight how different components of the home literacy environment are associated with different components of preschool‐aged children’s literacy and language abilities, findings that become more importa...

283 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202325
202282
2021278
2020294
2019179
2018144