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JournalISSN: 2158-7833

EMS world 

About: EMS world is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Emergency medical services & Poison control. It has an ISSN identifier of 2158-7833. Over the lifetime, 188 publication(s) have been published receiving 383 citation(s).
Papers published on a yearly basis
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Journal Article
TL;DR: A mbulance safety has special significance to the staff at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and its Office of Emergency Medical Services and by leading collaborative efforts among national, state and local organizations engaged in improving EMS nationwide.
Abstract: A mbulance safety has special significance to the staff at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and its Office of Emergency Medical Services. As current or former EMTs, paramedics, firefighters, emergency nurses and state EMS officials, many of us have spent time in ambulances and routinely respond to traffic crashes. The people at NHTSA all work to advance emergency medical services by collecting and analyzing critical EMS data and by leading collaborative efforts among national, state and local organizations engaged in improving EMS nationwide. But we serve a broader mission as well: keeping people safe on our nation’s roadways. The incredible story of an ambulance crash in Minnesota (see “A Profound Impact” on page 84) demCRASH INVESTIGATIONS

25 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: Tai chi may help to improve balance and stability in older people and in those with Parkinson’s disease, reduce back pain and pain from knee osteoarthritis, and improve quality of life in people with heart disease, cancer, and other chronic illnesses.
Abstract: Practicing tai chi may help to improve balance and stability in older people and in those with Parkinson’s disease, reduce back pain and pain from knee osteoarthritis, and improve quality of life in people with heart disease, cancer, and other chronic illnesses. Tai chi and qi gong may ease fibromyalgia pain and promote general quality of life. Qi gong may reduce chronic neck pain, but study results are mixed. Tai chi also may improve reasoning ability in older people.

17 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: Burnout and PTSD are closely linked and often underreported in EMS and providers experiencing burnout that doesn't resolve within a few weeks may actually be experiencing PTSD.
Abstract: Burnout and PTSD are closely linked and often underreported in EMS. EMS classrooms do little or nothing to prepare providers for the inherent emotional stresses of emergency response and the "thick skin" culture of EMS may make many providers apprehensive about sharing their true feelings. Burnout is triggered by many of the same stresses that lead to the symptoms of PTSD and providers experiencing burnout that doesn't resolve within a few weeks may actually be experiencing PTSD. Be mindful of yourself and your fellow coworkers, particularly after a very traumatic response. And remember traumatic responses don't need to be as dramatic as Sept. 11, New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina or the Aurora, CO shootings to bother an EMS worker. In contrast, these are the calls where providers often receive the most attention. Instead, watch for the new father who just performed CPR on an infant the same age as his own, or the provider who just watched his or her friend die following a motor vehicle collision. Pay attention to yourself and colleagues, and be responsible and honest with yourself and others about when coping strategies are enough, and when they aren't. Finally, don't ever be afraid to seek help.

11 citations



Journal Article
TL;DR: The injury of concern is not the cervical spine fracture but the unstable cervical fracture with the potential for further neurological deficits, and it is logical that among patients with lesser mechanisms of injury, the rate of cervical spine injuries increases substantially.
Abstract: | By Karl A. Sporer, MD, FACEP, FACP We need to reevaluate current practices and develop a saner cervical policy T he spinal immobiliza- tion of trauma patients suspected of having spinal injury has been a cornerstone of prehos- pital care for decades. Current prac- tices are based on the belief that a patient with an injured spinal column can deteriorate neurologically without immobilization. This concern has ballooned to include large numbers of patients with little or no chance of such an injury and caregivers with little appreciation for the complica- tions caused by use of the cervical collar and spinal board. Somewhere between 1 million and 5 million patients receive spinal immobiliza- tion each year in the United States. 1,2 The injury of concern is not the cervical spine fracture but the unstable cervical fracture with the potential for further neurological deficits. 3 It is clear that among severely traumatized patients admitted to hospitals, the rate of cervical spine fractures is 2%–5% and the rate of unstable cervical frac- tures is 1%–2%. 4–6 For patients with head injuries, the rate of cervical spine injuries increases substantially. 7 Among patients with known unstable cervical spine fractures, half in one study demonstrated neurological deficits upon hospital arrival. 8 Most clinicians would agree that this high-risk group would benefit from spinal immobiliza- tion, and we are truly concerned about that 0.5%–1% with unstable cervical spine fractures and intact spinal cords. It is logical that among patients with lesser mechanisms of injury, the NOVEMBER 2012 | EMSWORLD.com Trauma Types and Cervical Injury Rates Clinical Group Cervical Fractures Cervical Cord Injuries Polytrauma All blunt trauma Blunt assault Penetrating trauma

9 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20178
201621
201523
201424
201343
201236