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JournalISSN: 0172-8865

English World-wide 

John Benjamins Publishing Company
About: English World-wide is an academic journal published by John Benjamins Publishing Company. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Varieties of English & Creole language. It has an ISSN identifier of 0172-8865. Over the lifetime, 658 publications have been published receiving 11053 citations. The journal is also known as: EWW. English world-wide.


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TL;DR: De Swaan et al. as discussed by the authors proposed a new theoretical model, based on language systems theory, to better represent and understand the complex relationships obtaining between varieties of standard and non-standard English in the contemporary English language complex.
Abstract: Contact between and mutual influences among varieties of standard and non-standard English have always been a central concern in research on World Englishes. In a mobile and globalising world such contacts are by no means restricted to diffusion of features in face-to-face interaction, across contiguous territories in space or up and down the sociolinguistic scale. In order to better represent and understand the complex relationships obtaining between varieties of standard and non-standard English in the contemporary “English language complex” (McArthur 2003: 56; Mesthrie and Bhatt 2008: 1–3), the present paper proposes a new theoretical model, based on language systems theory (de Swaan 2002, 2010). While the model is not designed to supersede existing alternatives, such as the Kachruvian (1982) Circles, it will nevertheless complement them in important ways, chiefly because it is better equipped to handle uses of English in domains beyond the post-colonial nation state. The “World System of Englishes” model was developed in the course of the author’s work on the use of pidgins and creoles in web forums serving the post-colonial West African and Caribbean diasporas. The way Nigerian Pidgin figures in the creation of a globalised digital ethnolinguistic repertoire will hence serve as an illustration of its usefulness.

186 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The GloWbE corpus as discussed by the authors is based on 1.9 billion words in 1.8 million web pages from 20 different English-speaking countries, with approximately 60% coming from informal blogs and the rest from a wide range of other genres and text types.
Abstract: In this paper, we provide an overview of the new GloWbE Corpus — the Corpus of Global Web-based English. GloWbE is based on 1.9 billion words in 1.8 million web pages from 20 different English-speaking countries. Approximately 60 percent of the corpus comes from informal blogs, and the rest from a wide range of other genres and text types. Because of its large size, its architecture and interface, the corpus can be used to examine many types of variation among dialects, which might not be possible with other corpora — including variation in lexis, morphology, (medium- and low-frequency) syntactic constructions, variation in meaning, as well as discourse and its relationship to culture. This focus article was commented upon by Christian Mair , Joybrato Mukherjee , Gerald Nelson , and Pam Peters , with a response by Mark Davies and Robert Fuchs .

181 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Oxford Guide to World English as mentioned in this paper provides a rich and detailed survey of English as a language in 70 countries worldwide and has a significant role in 20 more, about a quarter of them native speakers.
Abstract: Reviews 'Excellent...comprehensive...a delightful book.' -TLS 'astonishingly comprehensive book...packed with pleasure' -Christopher Hirst, The Independent Magazine 'This is a wonderfully comprehensive resource which will appeal to anyone interested in language.' -Roy Johnson, Open University Long gone are the days when English as proprietarily used by educated people in the tiny triangle of southern England formed by Oxford, Cambridge and London is deemed correct and all other versions wrong. The Oxford Guide to World English takes as its "descriptivist" starting point that English is now spoken in every continent by over a billion people across the world, about a quarter of them native speakers. In 70 countries worldwide English is an official or semi official language and has a significant role in 20 more. And because of the Internet--the language of which is 75 per cent English--the number of English users is rising exponentially with middle classes everywhere seeking it for their children as a global resource owned by nobody and everybody. Sadly, it has also become a very powerful– almost predatory-language which seriously threatens ‘endangered’ languages. The regional varieties and their evolution make a fascinating study that forms the main body of Tom McArthur’s book, a spin-off from his The Oxford Companion to the English Language (1992). In Singapore, for example, the particles "on" and "off" can be used as verbs as in "to on/off the light" and he lists 34 expressions used in Antarctic English which have "ice" as a prefix ranging from "ice year" and "ice tongue" to "icepan" and "ice pilot." Each variety of English is minutely discussed in terms of its history, grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary. The 500 pages of The Oxford Guide to World English conclude by examining the ways in which English continues to change, and the role of so called "standard" English and whether or not the world now needs an international Standard version. Then there’s the vexed question of English teaching. Should it be, or is it, a profession, a social service or a global industry? Macarthur quotes Indian journalist Santanu Bora writing in the Maharashtra Herald: "I am speaking a living language and writing one too. I don’t hate Bob Marley’s English any more than Paul McCartney’s. Paul’s got rain and snow in his way of speaking and Bob’s got sun and sand in his speech. I have the monsoon, the mystic, religions, caste, poverty, the Queen... the list in long, in mine." Susan Elkin

174 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202310
202220
202123
202017
201917
201817