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Showing papers in "Environment and Planning D-society & Space in 2009"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the relation of political spaces and borders to citizenship is investigated, and notions of deterritorialization and reterritorialisation are examined in relation to ideas of the material constitution of Europe.
Abstract: The discussion in this paper moves through three stages. In the first the relation of political spaces and borders to citizenship is interrogated; in the second, notions of deterritorialization and reterritorialization are examined in relation to ideas of the material constitution of Europe; and, in the third section it returns to the issue of citizenship and its relation to cosmopolitanism. Rather than being a solution or a prospect, Europe currently exists as a ‘borderland’, and this raises a number of issues that need to be confronted.

235 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Rules for the Human Zoo, also known as the Elmauer Rede, originally appeared in 1999 in the newspaper Die Zeit and was subsequently published by Suhrkamp in 2001.
Abstract: Rules for the Human Zoo, also known as the Elmauer Rede, originally appeared in 1999 in the newspaper Die Zeit and was subsequently published by Suhrkamp in 2001 In this response to Heidegger's Le

231 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Peter Adey1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore how the mobile body and specifically the face have become a site of observation, calculation, prediction, and action in the process of moving across borders and how in the circulatory space of the airport/border, the body's circulatory systems, biological rhythms, and affective expressions have become objects of suspicion.
Abstract: This paper explores how the mobile body and, specifically, the face have become a site of observation, calculation, prediction, and action in the process of moving across borders. The paper explores how in the circulatory space of the airport/border, the body's circulatory systems, biological rhythms, and affective expressions have become objects of suspicion—mobile surfaces from which inner thoughts and potentially hostile intentions are scrunitized, read, and given threatening meaning by the newest modes of airport security and surveillance. Examined according to the vectoral modes of historicity and virtual possibility, as well as the internal and external play of intention and feeling, the paper uncovers an increased attention to differential axes of mobility—of past and future, surface and interior. The paper situates these techniques within the preemptive biopolitical securitisation of mobility across borders which, it is argued, has found its referent object in the primal realm of affective capacities.

224 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the relationship between identity, belonging, and place with young refugees and asylum seekers living in Sheffield, UK and Aarhus, Denmark, respectively, and highlighted the importance of being "in place" for attachment and security.
Abstract: Drawing on empirical research with young refugees and asylum seekers (aged 11–18) now living in Sheffield, UK, and Aarhus, Denmark, respectively, this paper explores some of the relationships between identity, belonging, and place. We begin by reflecting on the young people's sense of identity as Somali in the context of periods of forced and voluntary mobility. We then consider what it means to be Muslim in the context of the different communities of practice in Aarhus and Sheffield. Finally, we consider the extent to which the interviewees self-identify as Danish or British. In reflecting on these different dimensions of identification and belonging, we conclude by highlighting the importance of being ‘in place’ for attachment and security, and identify implications of the findings for integration and cohesion policies.

156 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explore the ways in which terrorism and climate change are imagined, drawing on a conjoined history in which preemption and precaution are not easily separable, and suggest that these are caught between a desire for rationality and affective governance through catastrophic visions.
Abstract: Terrorism and climate change are frequently perceived as ‘total threats’ articulated and imagined through a wide array of arts and technologies. If the construction of these threats appears similar then so are the pleas for preemptive and precautionary action. In this paper we explore the ways in which terrorism and climate change are imagined, drawing on a conjoined history in which preemption and precaution are not easily separable. We then trace this through the knowledges, models, and ideas of risk that inform contemporary debates on these issues and suggest that these are caught between a desire for rationality and affective governance through catastrophic visions. Furthermore, we argue that these imaginations of an actionable future have political consequences that depoliticize and delegitimate debate and that potentially bring the unimaginable into being. Reconceiving precautionary politics is thus vital if we are to engage ethically with the world.

142 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the politics of contemporary encampment within the UK with reference to the positioning of asylum seekers as a group subjected to a biopolitical logic of "compassionate repression" and argues that through such acts of sovereign abandonment asylum seekers are relegated to a position reliant solely upon the ethical sensibilities of others.
Abstract: This paper examines the politics of contemporary encampment within the UK with reference to the positioning of asylum seekers as a group subjected to a biopolitical logic of ‘compassionate repression’. The paper opens by examining the utility of presentations of the asylum seeker as an exemplar of Agamben's figure of the homo sacer. Drawing on recent critiques of the British government's apparent turn to a ‘deliberate policy of destitution’, I argue that through such acts of sovereign abandonment asylum seekers are relegated to a position reliant solely upon the ethical sensibilities of others. I then proceed to consider ways in which such a positioning ‘outside the law’ has been employed by asylum seekers and local campaigners to make ethical claims and demands upon the relational nature of the citizen as a figure of potential bare life. I then close by arguing that such an ethical gesture alone, of ‘assuming bare life’, is not enough and that the outright rejection of logics of distinction which Agamben...

135 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the role of tourist photography and visual practice within the tourist experience has been discussed, and it is argued that photography is not merely an empty practice, but, rather, lights up tourist experience by highlighting key moments of anticipation, rewriting, and remembrance and reliving.
Abstract: This paper seeks to renegotiate the role of visuals and visual practice within the tourist experience. Embracing recent developments in tourist studies, I seek to move from understanding tourism as a series of predetermined, linear, and static stages through which we pass to be a tourist. In doing so, I explore the ways in which visuals, in particular photography and subsequent visualities, enliven tourists' becoming through a multiplicity of fluid and dynamic performances, practices, and processes. I suggest photography is not merely an empty practice, but, rather, lights up the tourist experience. The emerging dynamics of visual practice renegotiate new understandings between tourists and place to establish a series of conceptual moments that outline photography as: political artefacts, reflexive performances, the imagination of space, embodied visualities, and ethical prompts. Such conceptualisations and practices of tourist photography are by no means arbitrary, but are situated in a framework of visuality that highlights key moments of anticipation, rewriting, and remembrance and reliving. Thus, I move beyond notions of the hermeneutic cycle of travel, and present photographs and photography as complex performative spaces that extend beyond divisible boundaries of the before, during, and after travel experiences and infiltrate the entire tourist experience.

130 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: If border disclosures which ‘take apart’ the body are more precisely understood as visualisations, then there are more fundamental issues than recourse to rights of privacy can counteract.
Abstract: The UK Home Office and the US Transportation Security Administration have made substantial recent investment in new Backscatter X-ray scanners to screen bodies at securitised border checkpoints. Promising to make the invisible visualisable, these devices project an image of a naked body onto a screen to identify concealed ‘risk’. Contemporary security practices which seek to fix identity at the border through biometrics, datamining, and profiling—of which the ‘whole body scanner’ is part—have their genealogy in efforts in aesthetics and medical science to mine the body for certainties and reveal something of the unknown future. The scan is revealed as a simultaneous partitioning and projection, the body ‘digitally dissected’ into its component parts, from which a specific, securitised visualisation is shaped. Drawing on the entangled histories of ‘body knowledge’ in art, science, and anatomy—their techniques of abstraction and technologies of visualisation—we explore what light may be shed on the Backscat...

129 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors draw attention to multiple competing definitions of biopolitics, and in so doing problematize the term as a catchall category to describe either the non-sovereign or the post-severeign operation of power.
Abstract: In this paper we want to open up for discussion what counts as ‘biopolitics’—a term frequently used by critics and devotees alike to describe the organization of political power and authority in a world after Bretton Woods, the Cold War, and 9/11. We do so on two fronts. On the one hand, we contrast Foucault on war and the normalizing society, Agamben on thanatopolitics, and Hardt and Negri on biopotenza. Our goal here is to draw attention to multiple competing definitions of biopolitics, and in so doing problematize the term as a catchall category to describe either the ‘nonsovereign’ or the ‘postsovereign’ operation of power. On the other hand, while refusing some baseline definition of what counts as biopolitics, we develop our own specifically geographical criticisms of Agamben and Hardt and Negri on the topic of biopolitics. Following Sparke's recent interrogation of postfoundational thought on account of its oftentimes buried metaphysics of geopresence, we submit that Agamben as well as Hardt and Ne...

118 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The last two decades have witnessed, as part of a wider financialisation of British economy and society, a creeping privatisation of social welfare provision as discussed by the authors, and political justification for the expans...
Abstract: The last two decades have witnessed, as part of a wider financialisation of British economy and society, a creeping privatisation of social welfare provision. Political justification for the expans...

94 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an account of a walk along a section of the South West Coast Path (SWC) in the UK, which is one of the few places where any of the twenty demarcated national trails and long-distance routes in UK intersects a city.
Abstract: The challenge of producing geographical narrative has recently been enhanced through work under the banners of affect and nonrepresentational theory. This has been registered in a range of topics in cultural, social, and political geography, and impacted in work on landscape. Such work has antecedents in several decades of humanistic geography and is immersed in more recent writings on performance and subjectivity and the critical rethinking of being, dwelling, movement, and place. With those and allied works in mind, this paper interrogates such literatures through writing about walking an urban section (through the port of Plymouth) of Britain’s South West Coast Path; one of the few places where any of the twenty demarcated national trails and long-distance routes in the UK intersects a city. The existence of a rich literature on strolling in urban space opens up possibilities and connections. However the approach here is deliberately eclectic and also draws on works from/about geopolitics, natural history, and urban studies. My purpose here is to bring such literatures into closer and productive dialogue, through an account that shifts geographical and temporal scales and perspectives. This is done through the device of an evening’s walk along a section of the path: negotiating spaces of capital and sovereignty. Military geography and security/insecurity emerge as master keys to how topography has been shaped here and the paper draws a series of connections between landscape, life, death, and military activities, both near and far. What the paper aims to do, therefore, is to illustrate how geopolitics affects us—to illustrate how the repercussions of militarism, war, and death are folded into the textures of an everyday urban fabric. This has implications for how other landscapes, places, and paths might be understood.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that borderlands are a key site for investigating the connections between the state of exception and securitization processes because political borders are the symbolic markers of the limits of a sovereign's authority.
Abstract: The narratives of fear and uncertainty from the discourse of the ‘global war on terror’ have been used by many governments to expand securitization processes. As more aggressive security tactics have been deployed, scholars have sought to understand the changing relationship between individual rights and the authority of sovereign states by drawing on Giorgio Agamben's insights into the state of exception. In this paper I argue that borderlands are a key site for investigating the connections between the state of exception and securitization processes because political borders are the symbolic markers of the limits of a sovereign's authority. I trace the securitization of the borderlands between India and Bangladesh and I describe the increasingly exceptional measures employed by Indian border security forces in order to prevent terrorist threats from entering India. At the intersection of the state of exception in the borderlands and the securitization narratives and practices of the global war on terror...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Parkour has become widely practised in recent years, with most of its participants (or traceurs) conducting it in urban environments as mentioned in this paper, and the Badiouian event is a more appropriate lens through which to theorise parkour and its participants' relationship with the city in that it embraces a serene ethos of urban rediscovery.
Abstract: Parkour, or l'art du deplacement, has become widely practised in recent years, with most of its participants (or traceurs) conducting it in urban environments. Studying parkour and those who practise it provides urban geographers with a new and fascinating way in which movement is perceived in the city. Using the theoretical idioms of ‘smooth and striated space’ (Deleuze and Guattari, 1987, A Thousand Plateaus Continuum, London) and ‘the event’ (Badiou, 2005, Being and Event Continum, London), this paper will position parkour as an alternate way of theorising the city as an arena for capitalist versus subversive practices. Moving away from the idea of smooth space incorporating a ‘war machine’, the Badiouian event is a more appropriate lens through which to theorise parkour and its participants’ relationship with the city, in that it embraces a serene ethos of urban rediscovery.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that two technologies of governance are central to contemporary rule in Colombia: state fragmentation and citizen education, exemplified by the recovery of public space from street vendors.
Abstract: In this paper I seek to move beyond understandings of Colombia as a failed state or qualified democracy by exploring how the state continues to govern despite widespread shortcomings. I argue that two technologies of governance are central to contemporary rule in Colombia: state fragmentation and citizen education. These technologies are exemplified by the recovery of public space from street vendors in order to preserve it as a privileged site for citizenship. This process is made possible by the proliferation of state agencies, policies, and plans which define the problem of public space as one of its invasion by ambulant vendors, and the solution to this invasion as the relocation of vendors to spatially marginalized and state-regulated markets where they are taught to overcome their ‘culture of informality’ by participating in political and economic transactions in state-prescribed ways. I argue that the recovery of public space and relocation of street vendors is a spatial technology of governance th...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Sovereign Map as discussed by the authors is a translation of the 1992 book L'Empire des Cartes, which is essentially a book about the construction of knowledge, the uses of power, and the geography of representations.
Abstract: It would be a great shame if this book were read only by cartographers. A translation of the 1992 book L'Empire des Cartes, The Sovereign Map is essentially a book about the construction of knowledge, the uses of power, and the geography of representations. As such it deserves a wide audience. The French title of the book would literally translate as `the empire of maps', a phrase that perhaps works more powerfully in a French context, where the construction of the empire really was a cartographic project. Yet the politics of the approach is perhaps somewhat muted in the book, despite Christian Jacob's important claim that: `̀The power of maps, however, is also a tool for power: ruling over a province, a nation, a kingdom, an empire, protecting or conquering a territory; imposing upon it the rationality of an administrative grid, a political project of reform or of development'' (page xviii). The subtitle, which is a strictly accurate and literal rendering of the French Approche thëorëtique de la cartographie a© travers l'histoire, is also interesting. We should note that Jacob is concerned with theoretical approaches in cartography, not theoretical approaches to cartography. In other words, through a historical analysis he attempts to uncover the theoretical presuppositions of cartography, rather than to use theoretical models to uncover new insights into the practices. This is not an insignificant point: trained as a classicist, Jacob is engaged in an essentially hermeneutical project, treating maps as texts within contexts. Of course, Jacob is informed by a range of theories. Some of these are from theorists that readers of this journal will be familiar with, such as Bruno Latour and Michel de Certeau, to whom the book is dedicated. He also draws on the novelist Italo Calvino and the literary theorist Henri Meschonnic, and Jorge Luis Borges is an inevitable point of reference. From the acknowledgements it seems his extended network includes Paul Claval, Pierre Vidal-Naquet, and Claude Nicolet who, although perhaps not well known to English-language readers, are distinguished French scholars of geography, Greece, and Rome, respectively. He also notes the enthusiasm for the project of the recently deceased musician and composer Hector Zazou. However, it is his own skills as an interpreter that will be the most valuable to readers of this book, beyond any explicitly theoretical innovations. Although the book is inherently interdisciplinary, Jacob is an accomplished historian of ideas, covering a broad period ranging from Ancient Greece through to the present. Yet he notes that his is a project `̀ refusing the dream of a universal history of cartography, now beyond the reach of the isolated scholar'' (page 361). He analyses the technical procedures of map-making, both in terms of what they enable, but also what they reveal or obscure visually, and gives a great deal of emphasis to the text on mapsötitles, codes, place names, etcöand the pictorial representations that often fill their margins or `blank spaces'. The illustration of the unknown reveals a great deal. He is good on the backgrounds and contexts of those who made maps, but also on those who used them. Jacob suggests that his concern is with `̀ the medium, not the message, of maps, nor their geographical content and value'' (page xv). This is a point he insists upon regularly, often explicitly leaving aside `̀ the matter of the geographical referent for the sake of a microscopic approach to the map'' (pages 104 ^ 105). Jacob talks of the two threads running through the book: the map as material commodity, to be perused; and the map as `̀ a rational construction, an intellectual space ruled by geometry, symmetry, and the requirements of geographical knowledge'' (page 2). The map is both object to be perceived and image to be interpreted, and Jacob thus analyses not simply the representation in maps, but the representation of maps, talking a lot about their materiality, or, less often, their virtuality. Although the book predates more recent developments in digital mapping, many of the arguments can be easily extended there. But he also asks a range of questions concerning the use of maps, effectively a transfer of the arguments of the role of the reader of books to the user Reviews Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 2009, volume 27, pages 566 ^ 570

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors draw on an analysis of forty-five published autobiographical accounts of individuals with an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) to highlight the important role of their, often intense, emotional relations to 'natural' things and places.
Abstract: This paper draws on an analysis of forty-five published autobiographical accounts of individuals with an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) to highlight the important role of their, often intense, emotional relations to 'natural' things and places. In doing so, it offers a partial corrective to clinical and popular views of people with autism as almost entirely asocial and unconcerned with the beings and doings of others. A textual hermeneutic of the phenomenal insights reported by authors reveals instead that their personal geographies are characterized by rich, rewarding, and meaning- ful relationships with the wider more-than-human world, and that aspects of their lives can be undeniably, agreeably, 'social' in this broader sense. Such an analysis may offer important, albeit methodologically limited, insights into experiences of ASD while also challenging dominant under- standings of 'sociality' ˆin the sense of 'being-with-others'ˆand of emotional involvement, that focus entirely on interactions between human beings. Indeed, to some extent, these emotionally charged experiences of the 'natural' world resonate with the feelings of many more neurotypical individuals.

Journal ArticleDOI
Paul Harrison1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a phenomenology of "dreamless sleep", a state in which a subject cannot be said to be doing anything at all, for the moment they have no bearing or gait, no focused or dispersed attention, no reflexive, deliberative or tacit understanding, and a susceptibility and finitude which, they suggest, are the very condition of possibility of practice and action.
Abstract: Increasingly the focus of social analysis and explanation is falling upon doings, on actions and practices, insofar as they are understood to be the origin rather than the effect of signification and meaning. This paper offers a sympathetic critique of such ‘ontologisation’ of practice, asking what is presumed about the human and the social when practice is taken as the primary social ‘thing’. The critique works by outlining, somewhat tentatively, a ‘phenomenology’ of dreamless sleep; a situation and a state in which a subject cannot be said to be doing anything at all. The figures that will be discussed below lie flat out; for the moment they have no bearing or gait, no focused or dispersed attention, no reflexive, deliberative or tacit understanding. This discussion is developed through a reading of Tim Ingold’s (2000) landmark essay “The temporality of the landscape” (in The Perception of the Environment Routledge), here taken as exemplary of a broad range of practice based approaches. While looking specifically at issues around skill, place, and sociality, the overarching claim of the paper is that thinking about sleep and about being a being which sleeps provides a way of touching on the susceptibility and finitude of corporeal existence. A susceptibility and a finitude which, I suggest, are the very condition of possibility of practice and action.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the concept of regimes of publicity is used to explore how marginalised groups are included in the public sphere and how publics might be formed and received, focusing on three interlinked elements of regime of publicity: community and social norms, legitimacy, and relations that constitute property.
Abstract: As groups struggle to gain visibility and voice in the public sphere and as new publics form, they may expand the sense of inclusiveness within a polity, but these new publics may also rub against broader, hegemonic ideals of ‘the’ public sphere This paper utilises the concept of ‘regimes of publicity’ to explore how marginalised groups are included in the public Regimes of publicity are the prevailing system of laws, practices, and relations that condition the qualities of a public and the ways that it is situated with respect to other publics In exploring how publics might be formed and received, we focus on three interlinked elements of regimes of publicity—community and social norms, legitimacy, and the relations that constitute property—as they condition the strategies of activists and the resources that different agents and institutions bring to struggles over entry to the public The argument we present highlights the ongoing nature of struggles for access to the public realm and the fragmented nature of the public

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that it is possible to think of different ways of raising the spectre of space which are as plausible as the account provided by Sloterdijk's spatial philosophy/philosophy of space.
Abstract: This paper begins with an appreciation and critique of the remarkable work of Peter Sloterdijk which makes it possible to open up a number of issues concerning philosophy and its relation to the social sciences and humanities, most particularly concerning the role of evidence and the pervasiveness of Eurocentrism In particular, the paper argues that it is possible to think of different ways of raising the spectre of space which are as plausible as the account provided by Sloterdijk’s spatial philosophy/philosophy of space Navigating by the compass of classical Chinese civilisation, I proceed to sketch out a different diagnosis from that of Sloterdijk of how space is being materialised in contemporary Euro-American cultures Drawing on logographic traditions of writing the world, I argue that, rather than describing what is now being produced by capitalism and other actors as a warehoused world full of lost souls, it is possible to think of different means of describing how the future is being scripted

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the dominance of scientific modelling in the scientific and political constructions of climate change manifested through general circulation models and scientific visualisation is discussed. And the notion of "digital earth" is used to describe a terrain of knowledge and loss that breaks with this circuit of accounting.
Abstract: This paper seeks to give expression to notions of excess within economies of climate change. The paper begins by addressing the dominance of scientific modelling in the scientific and political constructions of climate change manifested through general circulation models and scientific visualisation. Considering this 'digital earth', the paper further investigates how the unit-based accumulation of earth data has actively secured the production of political responses that have both emulated and reinstated a model of accounting (such as the Stern Review and carbon trading). Considering the rendering of digital earth as a specific assemblage of globalisation produced through digitalisation, I argue that the digital realm is productive of its own forms of excess (expressed in aesthetics and globalism). I suggest how this excessive globality reveals its own fragmentation through negative presentation. Drawing from Georges Bataille's notion of expenditure and Maurice Blanchot's writing of the disaster I seek to describe a terrain of knowledge and loss that breaks with this aforementioned circuit of accounting, and instead considers another kind of relation (Bataille's concept of expenditure) to account for the wasting of the world. The paper concludes with a Bataillean 'sketch' to consider how this excess may be recuperated as an emergent ethic within the disaster yet to come.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an alternative and novel conceptualisation of buildings in time and space is proposed, drawing on the naturalistic ontology of Jubien and combining this with actor-network theory to explore how buildings might be conceived as multiple things with variant but persisting properties.
Abstract: The ontological status of historic buildings has until recently been little explored, particularly in relation to their conservation. This is curious, for the assumed status and existence of buildings have critical impacts upon our attempts to conserve them. Conventional conservation thought has conceived buildings as solid objects constructed under the gaze of a single architect and retaining exemplar properties worth preserving. This paper offers an alternative and novel conceptualisation of buildings in time and space, drawing on the naturalistic ontology of Jubien and combining this with actor-network theory to explore how buildings might be conceived as multiple things with variant but persisting properties (some of which may be worthy of conservation). Using the moment of post-1945 reconstruction, we explore conservation of the architecture and spaces of Exeter (UK) to consider three objects, their nature, persistence, properties, and formation. Doing so reveals the multiplicity of material and soci...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that sinks point toward the revision of the notion that environments are or should be in metabolic balance, in favor of more complex and hybrid ecologies and exchanges that incorporate the transformative capacities of waste.
Abstract: Sinks are a device within environmental studies that describe spaces and processes that capture and channel wastes. This paper first explores sinks both as a cultural figure of environmental understanding, and as an important technoscientific instrument within current attempts to describe the global carbon cycle in relation to climate change. The movement of wastes to and through sinks is often characterized as a metabolic operation, and this metabolic framing forms a key part of this investigation. Drawing on Serres’ notion of the parasite, the paper considers how waste, noise and interference may characterize other types of metabolic exchange that allow for a revised approach to sinks. The second section of this paper considers how waste “spills” across environments in space and time. Spills are a way to describe the movement and exchange of wastes that do not conform to a clear trajectory or network, but rather express more formless and even disruptive geographies. Three “spills” then structure this examination into the movement and mutation of waste, including the elusive transfer of carbon found within the “missing sinks” in the biosphere; the indistinct exchanges of carbon and other wastes that occur with human and nonhuman bodies; and the uncertain exchanges and accumulations of carbon wastes in the future. This investigation argues that sinks point toward the revision of the notion that environments are or should be in metabolic balance, in favor of more complex and hybrid ecologies and exchanges that incorporate the transformative capacities of waste. Concluding with Bennett’s discussion of the “ecology of matter,” this paper then suggests that the dynamic qualities of waste and matter require renewed attention to environmental exchanges, practices and imaginings.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the relationship between modernisation, consumption, and society, challenging received ideas about the distinction between "modern" and "premodern" geographies of food consumption, arguing that such distinctions may refer less to a historical process of transition than to a contrast between different forms of contemporary sociality experienced simultaneously in different sites of consumption.
Abstract: This paper examines the relationship between modernisation, consumption, and society, challenging received ideas about the distinction between ‘modern’ and ‘premodern’ geographies of food consumption. While conventional accounts posit a historical progression from premodern to modern forms of consumption, associated with the rise of the supermarket and the demise of the corner store, we argue that such distinctions may, in fact, refer less to a historical process of transition than to a contrast between different forms of contemporary sociality, experienced simultaneously in different sites of consumption. By drawing critically on the work of Auge and his contrast between places and nonplaces, these ideas are then put to work empirically in an examination of contemporary food shopping in Germany, focusing particularly on notions of consumer trust. A practice-based and ethnographically informed account of food shopping in Germany shows how distinctions between ‘traditional’ and ‘modern’ forms of consumptio...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the construction of femininity within Russian women's prisons using fieldwork carried out in three women's prison in the secure and restricted penal zone within the state of Mordavia.
Abstract: This paper examines the construction of femininity within Russian women's prisons. On the basis of fieldwork carried out in three women's prisons in the secure and restricted penal zone within Mord...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the epistemic fallacy is identified in terms of the ontemic fallacy, which, underwritten by an "undoing" of the metaphysics of presence, culminates in an effective "deontologization" of an immediately ontic entity.
Abstract: Human geography critiques of GIS are operationalized under a unique interpretation of ontology and epistemology. Internal to poststructuralism, this metaphysics collapses the traditional separation between ontology and epistemology, reducing ontological questions to epistemological constructs. Although critiques have moved beyond an initial fixation upon positivism, critical/cultural assessments of GIS tendered within the last ten years continue to motivate epistemology as a basis for its deconstruction. The epistemological reductionism of such a reading of the technology inappropriately abstracts GIS from its ontic basis in computing, giving rise to a fundamental ‘disconnect’ of poststructuralist metaphysics to the technology. This disconnect is identified in terms of (1) the epistemic fallacy, which, underwritten by (2) an ‘undoing’ of the metaphysics of presence, culminates in (3) an effective ‘deontologization’ of an immediately ontic entity. This does not negate the poststructuralist critique of GIS,...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper argued that the distinction between space and place cannot be abandoned or easily altered because it remains inextricably entangled with other key concepts, such as nature and economy, drawing upon Derrida's notion of differance.
Abstract: This paper reconsiders the distinction between the concepts of space and place. We argue that, rather than favoring one side of the place^space division, or dissolving the partition between them, the distinction needs to be maintained because it is a key site of Western metaphysics. Specifically, the distinction between space and place cannot be abandoned or easily altered because it remains inextricably entangled with other key concepts. Drawing upon Derrida's notion of differance, we illustrate two such entanglements, the relation of space^place with nature and with economy. We argue that space^place helps to constitute, but in turn is constituted by, nature and economy. The larger point is that none of these metaphysical concepts are separate and independent, but are entwined in complex and changing forms, producing effects that demand critical scrutiny.

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TL;DR: The authors argue that nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) constitute crucial sites at which welfare state restructuring and neoliberalism are enacted and materialised in everyday life practices, and they draw on the concept of "translation" to show the agency of NGOs in articulating macro-scale programmes of governance into concrete regulations that govern the conduct of everyday life.
Abstract: In this paper we argue that nonprofit, nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) constitute crucial sites at which welfare state restructuring and neoliberalism are enacted and materialised in everyday life practices. This paper responds to recent calls from geographers to move to finer scales of analysis that enrich our understanding about the geographies of welfare state restructuring and neoliberalism. Our response is based on case-study research of NGOs that provide social services to migrants in Minneapolis-St Paul, USA, and Toronto, Canada. We draw on the concept of ‘translation’ to show the agency of NGOs in articulating macroscale programmes of governance into concrete regulations that govern the conduct of everyday life. The case studies demonstrate the usefulness of seeing NGOs as translation mechanisms to current debates about the role of NGOs amidst welfare state restructuring and the rise of neoliberalism.

Journal ArticleDOI
J Simon Hutta1
TL;DR: In this paper, the concepts of "feelings of safety" and "fear of crime" have been criticised as they have been deployed in recent politics of community safety in the US.
Abstract: This paper critically engages with the concepts of ‘feelings of safety’ and ‘fear of crime’ as they have been deployed in recent politics of community safety. While the first part of the paper disc...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) seeks to locate refugees as part of the universe of human rights through refugee registration exercises; it attempts to map their displacement within the geography of emplaced citizenry.
Abstract: The lack of solid footing in political space is what makes the human rights claims of refugees most vulnerable in the contemporary international order. However, modern international human rights law and protection are predicated on a spatialised sense of the subject of rights that is formed in opposition to and in exclusion of the refugee. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) seeks to locate refugees as part of the universe of human rights through refugee registration exercises; it attempts to map their displacement within the geography of emplaced citizenry. Its conventional efforts in this regard fail, though, and, rather, serve to illustrate how the informal international movement of refugees still exceeds and, thus, undermines the universalism of the UN vision of human rights and freedoms. Consequently, the UNHCR has recently resorted to the highly sophisticated computerised registration technology, called proGres, under its Project Profile system. While the detail and complexity ...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Peter Sloterdijk is portrayed as a philosopher of elements who tries to correct the traditional philosophical reliance on earth by focusing on the elements air and water, arguing that the human animal does not prefer one element but switches from one element to the other.
Abstract: In the paper Peter Sloterdijk is portrayed as a philosopher of elements who tries to correct the traditional philosophical reliance on earth by focusing on the elements air and water. The paper discusses the role that the latter element plays in Sloterdijk's philosophy. It is argued that it is crucial to understand this role in order to come to grips with what Sloterdijk himself has referred to as his ‘amphibious’ anthropology. The human animal does not prefer one element but switches from one element to the other.