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JournalISSN: 1610-3653

Environmental Chemistry Letters 

Springer Science+Business Media
About: Environmental Chemistry Letters is an academic journal published by Springer Science+Business Media. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Adsorption & Chemistry. It has an ISSN identifier of 1610-3653. Over the lifetime, 1695 publications have been published receiving 69563 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the range of heavy metals, their occurrence and toxicity for plants, and their effects on the ecosystem is discussed, where the authors focus mainly on zinc, cadmium, copper, mercury, chromium, lead, arsenic, cobalt, nickel, manganese and iron.
Abstract: Metal contamination issues are becoming increasingly common in India and elsewhere, with many documented cases of metal toxicity in mining industries, foundries, smelters, coal-burning power plants and agriculture. Heavy metals, such as cadmium, copper, lead, chromium and mercury are major environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. Heavy metal accumulation in soils is of concern in agricultural production due to the adverse effects on food safety and marketability, crop growth due to phytotoxicity, and environmental health of soil organisms. The influence of plants and their metabolic activities affects the geological and biological redistribution of heavy metals through pollution of the air, water and soil. This article details the range of heavy metals, their occurrence and toxicity for plants. Metal toxicity has high impact and relevance to plants and consequently it affects the ecosystem, where the plants form an integral component. Plants growing in metal-polluted sites exhibit altered metabolism, growth reduction, lower biomass production and metal accumulation. Various physiological and biochemical processes in plants are affected by metals. The contemporary investigations into toxicity and tolerance in metal-stressed plants are prompted by the growing metal pollution in the environment. A few metals, including copper, manganese, cobalt, zinc and chromium are, however, essential to plant metabolism in trace amounts. It is only when metals are present in bioavailable forms and at excessive levels, they have the potential to become toxic to plants. This review focuses mainly on zinc, cadmium, copper, mercury, chromium, lead, arsenic, cobalt, nickel, manganese and iron.

2,898 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview of methods for wastewater treatment, and the advantages and disadvantages of available technologies can be found in this article, where the authors provide an overview of the available technologies and their performance characteristics.
Abstract: During the last 30 years, environmental issues about the chemical and biological contaminations of water have become a major concern for society, public authorities and the industry. Most domestic and industrial activities produce wastewaters containing undesirable toxic contaminants. In this context, a constant effort must be made to protect water resources. Current wastewater treatment methods involve a combination of physical, chemical and biological processes, and operations to remove insoluble particles and soluble contaminants from effluents. This article provides an overview of methods for wastewater treatment, and describes the advantages and disadvantages of available technologies.

1,300 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Based on recent research results, the occurrence of tetracycline antibiotics in the environment inhibits the growth of some terrestrial and aquatic species and the residual concentrations of such drugs could affect steroidogenic pathway and consequently cause endocrine disruption of aquatic species.
Abstract: Tetracycline antibiotics are one of the primarily antibiotics groups used for veterinary purposes, for human therapy and for agricultural purposes. Amongst the different antibiotics used, more attention is paid to tetracycline’s as it exhibits serious environmental problems including ecological risks and human health damages. Due to their extensive usage, most of the actual evidence suggests that tetracycline antibiotics are omnipresent compounds found in different ecological compartments. After medication, more than 70 % of tetracycline antibiotics are excreted and released in active form into the environment via urine and feces from humans and animals. Their highly hydrophilic character and low volatility have resulted in significant persistence in the aquatic environment. Very few studies describe the fate and toxicity of tetracycline antibiotics in the environment. Here, we review several important issues with regard to: (1) the toxicity of these compounds on aquatic and terrestrial organisms; (2) their estrogenic effects; (3) their behavior in different ecological systems and; (4) the by-products generated during water treatment. These antibiotics residues promote the development of antibiotic resistant microorganisms, which can induce adverse effect to human health by increasing the risk of certain infections. Based on recent research results, the occurrence of tetracycline antibiotics in the environment inhibits the growth of some terrestrial and aquatic species. Besides, the residual concentrations of such drugs could affect steroidogenic pathway and consequently may cause endocrine disruption of aquatic species. Most of the wastewater treatment plants are not capable of removing effectively the tetracycline antibiotics. Therefore, there is a need to develop alternative processes to remove them from waters. Advanced oxidation processes have been proposed as alternative methods to ensure higher degradation and mineralization of tetracycline antibiotics are present in waters.

886 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Emphasis will be placed on the use of bioaccumulation and biomarker responses in air, soil, water and food, as monitoring tools for the assessment of the risks and hazards of PAH concentrations for the ecosystem, as well as on its limitations.
Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a large group of organic compounds with two or more fused aromatic rings. They have a relatively low solubility in water, but are highly lipophilic. Most of the PAHs with low vapour pressure in the air are adsorbed on particles. When dissolved in water or adsorbed on particulate matter, PAHs can undergo photodecomposition when exposed to ultraviolet light from solar radiation. In the atmosphere, PAHs can react with pollutants such as ozone, nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, yielding diones, nitro- and dinitro-PAHs, and sulfonic acids, respectively. PAHs may also be degraded by some microorganisms in the soil. PAHs are widespread environmental contaminants resulting from incomplete combustion of organic materials. The occurrence is largely a result of anthropogenic emissions such as fossil fuel-burning, motor vehicle, waste incinerator, oil refining, coke and asphalt production, and aluminum production, etc. PAHs have received increased attention in recent years in air pollution studies because some of these compounds are highly carcinogenic or mutagenic. Eight PAHs (Car-PAHs) typically considered as possible carcinogens are: benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene and benzo(g,h,i)perylene. In particular, benzo(a)pyrene has been identified as being highly carcinogenic. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has promulgated 16 unsubstituted PAHs (EPA-PAH) as priority pollutants. Thus, exposure assessments of PAHs in the developing world are important. The scope of this review will be to give an overview of PAH concentrations in various environmental samples and to discuss the advantages and limitations of applying these parameters in the assessment of environmental risks in ecosystems and human health. As it well known, there is an increasing trend to use the behavior of pollutants (i.e. bioaccumulation) as well as pollution-induced biological and biochemical effects on human organisms to evaluate or predict the impact of chemicals on ecosystems. Emphasis in this review will, therefore, be placed on the use of bioaccumulation and biomarker responses in air, soil, water and food, as monitoring tools for the assessment of the risks and hazards of PAH concentrations for the ecosystem, as well as on its limitations.

798 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202375
2022188
2021291
2020147
2019143
2018106