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Showing papers in "Environmental Ethics in 1999"




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the relationship between ethics and epistemology in an ethics-based ontology is examined, drawing extensively on examples from indigenous cultures, and several striking implications of such an epistemological approach are explored.
Abstract: An ethics-based epistemology is necessary for environmental philosophy—a sharply different approach from the epistemology-based ethics that the field has inherited, mostly implicitly, from mainstream ethics. In this paper, we try to uncover this inherited epistemology and point toward an alternative. In section two, we outline a general contrast between an ethics-based epistemology and an epistemology-based ethics. In section three, we examine the relationship between ethics and epistemology in an ethics-based epistemology, drawing extensively on examples from indigenous cultures. We briefly explore several striking implications of an ethics-based epistemology in sections four and five.

60 citations






Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Christopher B. Barrett Raymond E. GrizzleDepartment of Economics Randall Environmental Studies CenterUtah State University Taylor UniversityLogan, UT 84322-3530 Upland, IN 46989-1001cbarrett@b202.usu.edu rygrizzle@tayloru.eduAbstract: This paper advances a holistic ecological approach based on a three-compartmentmodel. This approach favors policy initiatives that lie at the intersection of thethree major areas of concern common to most environmental controversies:environmental protection, provision of basic human needs, and advancingeconomic welfare. In support of this approach, we propose a "pluralisticstewardship” integrating core elements of anthropocentrism, biocentrism, andecocentrism. After presenting the basics of our model, we then explain why it isimportant to identify and promote a holistic ecological approach to sustainability. Here we employ the economic concept of path dependence, emphasizing that thereexist multiple paths society can follow in environmental ethics and policy but onceone has been chosen, implicitly or explicitly, there may be little opportunity toreverse such choices.

37 citations










Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the significance of Nietzsche's philosophy of nature for environmental ethics, and argue that the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and post-modern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity.
Abstract: In this paper, I examine the significance of Nietzsche’s philosophy for environmental ethics. Nietzsche’s philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today, because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic for our current understanding of nature. I will show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. From the perspective of Nietzsche’s critique of morality, environmental ethics is a highly paradoxical project. According to Nietzsche each moral interpretation of nature implies a conceptual seizure of power over nature. On the other hand, Nietzsche argues, the concept of nature is indispensable in ethics, because we have to interpret nature in order to have a meaningful relation with reality. I argue that awareness of this paradox might open a way to respect nature as radical otherness.









Journal ArticleDOI