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Showing papers in "Far Eastern Survey in 1946"


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16 citations


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13 citations


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7 citations


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7 citations


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TL;DR: The Joint Soviet-American Commission (JCC) as mentioned in this paper was formed to solve immediate problems of cooperation between the two commands and to plan for the formation of a provisional Korean democratic government.
Abstract: The Joint Soviet-American Commission, represent? ing the two commands in Korea, began its deliberations in the middle of January. The commission, which was provided for at the Moscow Conference, is to solve immediate problems of cooperation between the two commands and to plan for the formation of a provisional Korean democratic government. On the latter question there is the unfortunate likelihood of disagreement between the two commands, with the Americans backing the conservative Korean Provi? sional Government and the Soviets supporting the leftist People's Republic. It is hard to believe that the Korean leaders of the right and left will join together or even cooperate effectively in the construction of a new provisional government unless they are given genuine freedom to solve their own practical political problems. The agreement on January 9 of all parties in approval of the Big Three guarantees of Korea's independence and the methods to be pursued in its achievement was, however, a hopeful sign. The Joint Commission should not expect complete agreement among the Korean leaders; it must make allowances for minority opinions. And the Koreans on their side should accept in good faith the pledges made by the powers as to early independence. Since the end of the war American policy toward Korea has tended to drift without definite direction. This is unfortunate because Korea is proving to be the testing ground of American postwar policies in the Far East.

6 citations


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TL;DR: In this article, the first of three articles by Dr. Bodde on the Muslims of China proper was published. But they focused on the Cowrie Shell Miao of southwest China.
Abstract: editorial note: The problems of minority groups in China, as elsewhere, are of increasing significance. NonChinese elements of Sinkiang Province were discussed by Eleanor Lattimore in the Far Eastern Survey of May 3, 1944 and April 11, 1945. In the issue of August 14, 1946 was published an article by Margaret Portia Mickey on the Cowrie Shell Miao of southwest China. In this issue is the first of three articles by Dr. Bodde on the Muslims of China proper. Dr. Bodde is Associate Professor of Chinese at the University of Pennsylvania. During the war he served with the Office of Strategic Services and the Office of War Information.

6 citations


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4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The colonial powers are busy belaboring world public opinion ith benevolent promises of the good things they can bring to their restless dependencies in Southeast Asia as discussed by the authors. At the same time, as an earnest of their good intentions, they are careful to account for all possible benefits they have bestowed upon these regions in the past.
Abstract: The colonial powers are busy belaboring world public opinion ith benevolent promises of the good things they can bring to their restless dependencies in Southeast Asia. At the same time, as an earnest of their good intentions, they are careful to account for all possible benefits they have bestowed upon these regions in the past. Such accounts are usually phrased in absolute, rather than relative, terms, except that frequently for a given area the dismal condition of an earlier day may be compared with the shining achievement of recent date. We are impressed on hearing that school attendance in the Netherlands Indies steadily increased until 2,000,000 children were in primary schools; but we are rarely told that at best only one in five children of primary school age reached the Indies schools or that the comparable figure in the Philippines was four in five. The enviable reputation of the Indochinese public health services is enhanced by a statistic of 8,750,000 vaccinations in 1940 but further investigation shows that in Indochina there was only one doctor for every 38,000 persons, while in the Philippines there was one for every 3,200. Such examples suggest that any adequate evaluation of the past achievements of the colonial regimes in Southeast Asia should be made on a comparative basis, that accomplishments in one area should be judged in relation to comparable developments in neighboring areas. Comparisons, even in this tropical region of predominantly peasant populations, are, of course, made difficult by differences in the concrete situations and in the colonial objectives in the various areas, as well as by the impossibility of objectively quantifying many of the data. "What might have been done?" the question which figured so prominently during the

4 citations


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4 citations









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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A high standard of economic development is a prerequi? site for maintaining essential administrative and education functions in a self-governing society as discussed by the authors, and the two objectives conflicted in Burma mainly because the country's economic developments under prewar con? ditions benefited not the indigenous Burman popula? tion, whose view-point will inevitably dominate any venture in self-rule, but rather foreign business inter? ests.
Abstract: There is, of course, no inherent incompatibility be? tween the obje tive of pr ducing conomic weal h and that of training a people for self-government. A high standard of economic development is a prerequi? site for maintaining essential administrative and edu? cational functions in a self-governing society. The two objectives conflicted in Burma mainly because the country's economic developments under prewar con? ditions benefited not the indigenous Burman popula? tion, whose view-point will inevitably dominate any venture in self-rule, but rather foreign business inter? ests. The latter were understandably perturbed over the prospect of interference in their affairs by a gov? ernment answerable to Burman opinion. Either eco? nomic or political considerations have to be paramount; it cannot be both ways.