scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Showing papers in "Feminism & Psychology in 2009"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argued that, in contradistinction to its widely promoted ethical openness to its future, queer theory has been less scrupulous about its messy, flexible and multiple relations to its pasts, the critical and activist traditions from which it emerged and that continue to develop alongside in mutually informing ways.
Abstract: This article argues that, in contradistinction to its widely promoted ethical openness to its future, queer theory has been less scrupulous about its messy, flexible and multiple relations to its pasts, the critical and activist traditions from which it emerged and that continue to develop alongside in mutually informing ways. In particular, it assesses queer theory's tangled, productive and ongoing relations with feminist theory. Returning to the controversial analytic separation of gender and sexuality that has been prominently theorized as key to distinguishing between feminist and queer theoretical projects, the article traces the influence of Gayle Rubin's `Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality' through feminist and queer scholarship in order to demonstrate that, however different their projects, feminist theory and queer theory together have a stake in both desiring and articulating the complexities of the traffic between gender and sexuality.

154 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Carla Rice1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors draw from interviews with diversely embodied women to discuss difficulties encountered in interpreting their narratives of embodiment and reflect on strategies of embodied engagement, including de-centring my bodily self, re-visiting my body story, and imagining the other's embodied experiences in the creation of provisional meanings about participants' bodies and lives.
Abstract: Feminists influenced by post-conventional and critical perspectives confront a significant challenge when researching women's embodiments: the dilemma of representation. For researchers from positions of bodily privilege, issues of interpretation intensify when researching and writing across physical differences distorted by colonial and other hegemonic histories and legacies. In this article, I draw from interviews with diversely embodied women to discuss difficulties encountered in interpreting their narratives of embodiment. I reflect on strategies of embodied engagement, including de-centring my bodily self, re-visiting my body story, and imagining the other's embodied experiences in the creation of provisional meanings about participants' bodies and lives. To shed light on risks and rewards of researcher-embodied reflexivity to study sensitive subjects such as appearance and difference, I show how analysing my `body secrets' invites deeper exploration into dynamics of bodily privilege and abjection u...

92 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article used an autoethnographic approach and utilized sociological concepts such as the ''body-project'' to illustrate how the act of breastfeeding can be fraught with tension as contradicto...Despite the strong cultural pressure to breastfeed, however, many women ''fail'' to do so, with only 25 percent of women in the UK breastfeeding exclusively when the infant is four months old.
Abstract: In recent years, breastfeeding has been heavily promoted in the UK. This has been partly premised on the health benefits for women and infants, but there has also been a strong rhetoric of `the natural' that has surrounded childbirth practices more generally. Some feminist thought has been influential in promoting breastfeeding as a way of `resisting' the medicalization of childbirth and motherhood, associating it with women's personal agency and empowerment. Despite the strong cultural pressure to breastfeed, however, many women `fail' to do so, with only 25 percent of women in the UK breastfeeding exclusively when the infant is four months old. Recent research has begun to look at the negative psychological and emotional effects experienced by women in the light of this `failure'. Exploring these issues further, this article uses an autoethnographic approach and utilizes sociological concepts such as the `body-project' to illustrate how the act of breastfeeding can be fraught with tension as contradicto...

88 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the roots of feminist and liberation psychologies are explored and examples of contemporary praxis that are deeply informed by today's complex global realities are presented, with a focus on women's empowerment.
Abstract: This article explores the roots of feminist and liberation psychologies, positioning examples of contemporary praxis that are deeply informed by today's complex global realities. Examining the cons...

85 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This research had its beginnings in an act of trans activism, including a campaign by a number of trans organizations advocating the need for research dealing with health, well-being and access to health services in relation to this population.
Abstract: This research had its beginnings in an act of trans activism, including a campaign by a number of trans organizations advocating the need for research dealing with health, well-being and access to health services in relation to this population. This study set out to recruit the broadest possible community sample by using a range of recruitment techniques and an online survey. In total, 253 respondents completed the survey. Of these, 229 were from Australia (90.5%) and 24 (9.5%) were from New Zealand. Respondents rated their health on a five-point scale; the majority of the sample rated their health as ‘good’ or ‘very good’. On the SF36 scale, respondents had poorer health ratings than the general population in Australia and New Zealand. Respondents reported rates of depression much higher than those found in the general Australian population, with assigned males being twice as likely to experience depression as assigned females. Respondents who had experienced greater discrimination were more likely to re...

84 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a poststructuralist approach is used to investigate pole dancing as a form of aerobic exercise in the context of women empowerment, control, and the male gaze.
Abstract: The activity of 'pole dancing' has recently been transformed from an act performed exclusively in strip clubs to one currently marketed as a form of aerobic exercise. While much feminist academic work has investigated aspects of the sex industry, such as stripping, very little research has been conducted into this recent social phenomenon of pole dancing as a recreational activity. This study takes a feminist poststructuralist approach to the investigation of this topic through the discursive analysis of talk produced in a range of focus groups and interviews. Participants included instructors at pole dancing studios, pupils regularly attending the studios, one-off pole dancers and general university students (a total of 25 participants; 20 females and five males). Our analysis focuses on the ways in which ideological dilemmas surrounding issues such as empowerment, control and the male gaze are managed within the participants' accounts. Implications of these constructions are discussed in relation to the redefinition/reiteration of hegemonic, patriarchal notions of female sexuality.

79 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Ayala et al. as mentioned in this paper consider feminist/womanist interpretations of participatory action research through the conceptual lens of Borderlands scholarship as articulated by the late Gloria Anzaldúa, and demonstrate how Borderlands scholarship might be useful in delineating aspects of PAR that press us in the direction of liberation, away from the ways PAR has been abused and co-opted.
Abstract: Living between social worlds and inside multiple positionalities, we have found ourselves drawn to notions that capture the in-between-ness of our lives. As researchers, we ally ourselves with participatory action research (PAR), an epistemological stance building on Lewinian and Freierian traditions, which calls for research and/as action towards liberatory projects (Ayala, 2007; Torre et al., 2008). In this commentary, we consider feminist/womanist interpretations of PAR through the conceptual lens of Borderlands scholarship as articulated by the late Gloria Anzaldúa. This dialogue begins with two separate entrances: one into the theoretical world of Anzaldúa, the other into PAR as method and epistemology. From these two entradas, we move through three conceptual cross-over points, exploring Anzaldúa’s notions of multiplicity, choques and nos-otras.1 We close with an attempt to articulate a PAR Entremundos, borrowing Anzaldúa’s (2002) concept of between worlds, to demonstrate how Borderlands scholarship might be useful in delineating aspects of PAR that press us in the direction of liberation, and away from the ways PAR has been abused and co-opted (Cooke and Kothari, 2001).

73 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is suggested that LGBTQ psychology could usefully draw on critical health psychology principles and frameworks to explore non-heterosexual’s lived experiences of chronic illness, and also that there remains a need for specifically targeted support groups and services for LGB people with chronic illnesses.
Abstract: In this article we contribute to the expansion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) health psychology beyond the confines of sexual health by examining the experiences of lesbian, gay and bisexual people living with non-HIV related chronic illness. Using a (predominantly) qualitative online survey, the perspectives of 190 LGB people with 52 different chronic illnesses from eight countries were collected. The five most commonly reported physical conditions were arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, asthma and chronic fatigue syndrome. Our analysis focuses on four themes within participants? written comments: (1) ableism within LGBT communities; (2) isolation from LGBT communities and other LGB people living with chronic illness; (3)heteronormativity within sources of information and support and; (4) homophobia from healthcare professionals. We conclude by suggesting that LGBTQ psychology could usefully draw on critical health psychology principles and frameworks to explore non-heterosexual's lived experiences of chronic illness, and also that there remains a need for specifically targeted support groups and services for LGB people with chronic illnesses.

59 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A discursive analysis based on semi-structured interviews with eight English-speaking women of South Asian origin living in the UK, who had either escaped from or were currently seeking help for sexual violence is presented.
Abstract: The aim of this article is to explore some of the ways in which British South Asian women survivors of sexual violence (in particular, those who are either British born or have lived in the UK for ...

46 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explored children's experiences of war within a global political economy of silence, and argued that understanding trauma in conflict zones requires looking closely at children's descriptions of their ever-shifting relationships to different spaces as sites of trauma, resilience and agency.
Abstract: A growing body of psychological research has examined the effects of armed and political conflict on children, including, for example, work in Lebanon (Macksoud, et al.,1996), Palestine (Baker, 1990, 1993; Elbedour et al., 1997; El Sarraj and Qouta, 2005; Punamaki et al., 2001), South Africa (Dawes, 1990), Mozambique (Cliff and Noormahomed, 1993), Iraq (Dyregrov, 1993), Cambodia (Garbarino, 1993), Bosnia (Weine et al., 1995), Angola (McIntyre and Ventura, 1995), Guatemala (Miller, 1996), and Latin America (Allodi, 1989). This article explores children’s experiences of war within a global political economy of silence. The goal of this work is to capture children’s complex understandings of, and responses to, the trauma of ongoing militarization and political occupation as reflected in their perceptions of the loss of their homes. By utilizing the voices of children facing attacks against their home/safe space, this article argues that understanding trauma in conflict zones requires looking closely at children’s descriptions of their ever-shifting relationships to different spaces as sites of trauma, resilience and agency. Further, listening to how children reconstruct their individual and collective histories opens up possibilities for theorizing social trauma through a feminist and liberationist framework. By using contextually aware critical theories of feminist and liberation psychology we draw attention to the intimate connections between history, economic activities, globalization and globalized social relations (see Burman, 1998; Tickner, 1991; Wilkinson, 1997).

37 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors illustrate how women who engage in violent forms of justice-seeking require us to expand social psychological concepts of retributive and restorative models of justice, women's agency, and community organizing.
Abstract: Through an analysis of news reports and documentary footage on the Gulabi Gang and ethnographic reports on the Mahila Aghadi, both of India, we illustrate how women who engage in violent forms of justice-seeking require us to expand social psychological concepts of retributive and restorative models of justice, women's agency, and community organizing. Our grassroots feminist analysis in an Indian context integrates: (1) feminist definitions of punishment and ethical violence; (2) research on perceptions of justice and moral convictions; and, (3) the feminist and liberatory roles that women's and poor people's movements play in the reorganization and recovery of individual and community values.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: However, relatively few studies exist on postmaternity, colloquially the ''empty nest'' as discussed by the authors, and the present study is a women's perspective on the empty nest.
Abstract: Feminist research has examined a broad range of women's experiences as mothers. However, relatively few studies exist on postmaternity, colloquially the `empty nest'. The present study is a feminis...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For young women in western cultures, satisfying the dictates of traditional romantic norms while sustaining intimacy with same-sex friends and a sovereign sense of self can be daunting as discussed by the authors, and the present...
Abstract: For young women in western cultures, satisfying the dictates of traditional romantic norms while sustaining intimacy with same-sex friends and a sovereign sense of self can be daunting. The present...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined poor women's responses to direct and structural violence in Karachi, Pakistan, by combining goals and themes from liberation psychology with transnational feminism, and drew on interviews with Mohajir women survivors to analyse constructions of psychosocial trauma and attempts to rebuild post-conflict life-worlds, in a bid to understand the scope and contours of their agency within their ''limit situations'.
Abstract: The article examines poor women's responses to direct and structural violence in Karachi, Pakistan, by combining goals and themes from liberation psychology with transnational feminism. We draw on interviews with Mohajir women survivors to analyse constructions of psychosocial trauma and attempts to rebuild post-conflict life-worlds, in a bid to understand the scope and contours of their agency within their `limit situations'. Although agency, resistance, and critical consciousness remain constrained by multi-layered power relations, women's narratives reflect crucial insights about social structures impacting their lives, and point to the need for interventions that integrate trauma alleviation and opportunities for local, national, and transnational grassroots activism, advocacy and policy initiatives.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Examination of the short- and long-term psychological, physical and social health implications associated with pre-1992 investigations and eventual discharge of Canadian military servicewomen for reasons of homosexuality sheds light on the impact of the intersection between sexism and heterosexism.
Abstract: This study examines the short- and long-term psychological, physical and social health implications associated with pre-1992 investigations and eventual discharge of Canadian military servicewomen for reasons of homosexuality. Theoretically, it sheds light on the impact of the intersection between sexism and heterosexism. The feminist psycho-social ethnography of the commonplace methodology was utilized. The study draws on in-depth semi-structured interviews with 13 former military personnel who self-identified as lesbian. While in the military, study participants were persecuted and forced to adopt various cognitive and behavioural coping strategies to avoid being found out and discharged by the military’s Special Investigative Unit. Women reported that the relentless military surveillance, ongoing risk evaluation, and identity hiding contributed to psychological, physical and social health effects, including high stress, physical exhaustion, depression, substance abuse and social isolation. The criminal...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Although the majority of the contributions to this special issue do, in fact, consider one facet of non-normative sexuality or gender, overall they seek to expand the terrain of LGBTQ health psychology to address physical health more broadly, as well as mental health.
Abstract: Gender has been an important and profitable lens through which the bioand social sciences have sought to understand health, its differentials and inequalities. While health is clearly multi-factorial, gender has been recognized as an important determinant of health profiles and feminist principles of equity and inclusiveness have long been incorporated into health psychology (Brown Travis et al., 1991). Women’s health is an accepted sub-discipline in many fields and whilst men’s health remains a somewhat marginal concern (although see Courtney, 2000; Thomson, 2008), it is (generally) accepted that ‘the doing of health is a form of doing gender’ (Saltonstall, 1993: 12). This special issue aims to build upon this work by seeking to explore the value of sexuality as an axis of study in health psychology. When sexualities and health have traditionally intersected there has been an almost exclusive focus on sexual health research. Given the constitutive nature of health discourses – including the discourses and practices of health research – it is important that we recognize the limits and effects of a lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) health psychology that may have been corralled too much in the sexual health ‘ghetto’. We return to this concern later. In light of the focus on sexual health, and, indeed, the narrowing of this to gay and bisexual men’s sexual health, some have argued that LGBTQ health research should be disaggregated (Wilkinson, 2002). Although the majority of the contributions to this special issue do, in fact, consider one facet of non-normative sexuality or gender, overall they seek to expand the terrain of LGBTQ health psychology to address physical health more broadly, as well as mental health. Resisting the – at times understandable – calls for disaggregation also allows us to better recognize the role that gay men and lesbians in particular have played in advocating for social change, developing HIV/AIDS prevention programmes and setting agendas for meeting their health needs (e.g. Rofes, 2007). Exploring

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An agenda for a critically informed perspective of lesbian health psychology is proposed and explanations that do not reinscribe pathology are proposed.
Abstract: Although women’s health has been a central concern of feminist psychology, lesbian health has been largely overlooked. Adopting a feminist approach, this article considers the distinctiveness of lesbian health psychology by examining the contexts for lesbian health. Notions of disease and risk have underpinned the endeavour of constituting lesbians’ health as a research discipline. Dominant traditions have established lesbian health psychology along key dimensions of difference from heterosexual women: differences in risk and preventive health behaviours, in healthy behaviours, in experiences of healthcare, in mental health and in experiences of discrimination. In this article, I propose an agenda for a critically informed perspective of lesbian health psychology and for explanations that do not reinscribe pathology.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Bibb as discussed by the authors described coming home one night and seeing two residents beating up a third in front of the building, and the air reverberated with concern about what happened to the man and what shelter residents must do to manage such dangerous disregard.
Abstract: At a Welfare Warriors Research Collaborative (WWRC) meeting we were pooling evidence of homeless shelter staff abuses Dwayne Bibb, a co-researcher and shelter resident who identifies as African American, gay and gender nonconforming, described coming home one night and seeing two residents beating up a third in front of the building Frightened, Bibb walked a large arc around them and at the entranceway, Bibb told the shelter guards about the fight The guards responded: ‘There’s nothing going on over there’ Bibb said: ‘I wouldn’t lie to you – there’s a fight going on’ The guards looked over but took no action Bibb told us: ‘They didn’t do anything And these guys beating up a little guy’ The air reverberated with concern about what happened to the man and what shelter residents must do to manage such dangerous disregard And, as we talked, it became apparent that this incident reflects recurring dynamics that cut across low-income lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and gender nonconforming (LGBTGNC) people’s lives The WWRC came together in July 2007 to research violence from the perspective of racially and ethnically diverse low-income LGBTGNC people in New York City (NYC) We set out to better understand the strategies people use to manage violence and discrimination as well as the systemic relations that shape these experiences In this article, we introduce our theoretical assumptions, describe our participatory action research (PAR) and the epistemology that grounds our work and show how these fuel our thinking about social change

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Drawing on 21 interviews conducted with gay Australian sperm donors, the article provides a thematic analysis of instances of such emotion work and explores the implications of this for the health and well-being of gay men who donate sperm both to clinics and in private arrangements.
Abstract: As reproductive health clinics both within Australia and internationally continue to face a shortfall in the number of available sperm donors, so there exists a growing demand for men willing to do...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the paradox of Portuguese feminist liberation psychology, a discipline that is present inside the practical domain of social interventions, but remains unnamed, has been discussed, and it has been analyzed.
Abstract: In this article, we intend to show the paradox of Portuguese feminist liberation psychology, a discipline that is present inside the practical domain of social interventions, but remains unnamed. W...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a courtroom transcript concerning the confession to 10 murders by the serial killer, Dennis Rader, was analysed, and three main discourses were identified: perpetrator as ''sympathetic, ''serial killer'' and ''driven by sexual fantasy''.
Abstract: Much psychological research examining the serial killer has adopted an essentialist theoretical focus concentrating on the `nature' of the individual who commits the murder. This study, in contrast, aims to analyse the talk of a serial killer using principles taken from discursive psychology. A courtroom transcript concerning the confession to 10 murders by the serial killer, Dennis Rader, was analysed. The transcript was read and reread in order to examine how the killer drew upon popular understandings of serial killing, until eventually three main discourses were identified: perpetrator as `sympathetic', `serial killer' and `driven by sexual fantasy'. The analysis demonstrated that these discourses all served to reinforce the widely shared construction of the serial killer, i.e. being sexually motivated. Furthermore, the findings show how this construction served the functions of mitigating responsibility, justifying certain actions and obscuring violence. Possible implications of this construction and...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The assumption of heterosexuality in health research and clinical intervention is an insidious practice which acts to make LGBTQ individuals invisible as discussed by the authors, leading to gross misrepresentations of health risk and experience for many individuals.
Abstract: Charting the terrain of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) health psychology is an ambitious project. Some would question whether there can be a common terrain which will encompass the diverse experiences of all those who position themselves as LGBTQ. Research has found clear differences between gay men and lesbians on issues such as mental health (Cochran et al., 2003), identity development (Savin-Williams and Diamond, 2000) and relationship functioning (Green et al., 1996). At the same time, assumptions about ‘nonheterosexual’ populations are often based on research conducted with white, middle-class, gay men (Parks et al., 2004), which is generalized to all others who stand outside the heterosexual matrix, leading to gross misrepresentations of health risk and experience for many individuals.1 Mapping the terrain of LGBTQ health psychology is an important task, but we must be wary of denying diversity and difference in the aim of creating a unified field. There are a number of common threads that run through the six articles in this special issue. The heterocentric nature of health research and practice is the most obvious. The assumption of heterosexuality in health research and clinical intervention is an insidious practice which acts to make LGBTQ individuals invisible. This operates at many levels, starting with researchers not asking about sexual identity when collecting demographic information on participants, which discursively means that LGBTQ individuals do not exist. If there is no epidemiological data on our experience, no statistics on how many of us endure a particular health problem, how can there be theories or practices that address our particular needs or concerns? Equally, if being LGBTQ is deemed to be just about sex, as Jowett and Peel comment, researchers outside of the field of sexual health can compla-

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a call for contributions asked academics across disciplines and cultural contexts to reflect on their experiences of coming out (or not) in their teaching practice, and the response to the call was staggering, indicating that coming out remains an ongoing concern for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) (and heterosexual) academics, or at least those based in Englishspeaking western countries.
Abstract: One area of self-disclosure particularly pertinent to teaching feminist psychology, women’s studies and other university subjects linked to gender and sexuality relates to sexual and gender identities and practices. Most discussions have centred on the disclosure of a lesbian or gay sexual identity in the classroom. However, ‘coming out’, or not, around sexuality and gender identity can be much more than this, and in this special feature, we revisit and aim to reinvigorate discussion of this topic. Our call for contributions asked academics across disciplines and cultural contexts to reflect on their experiences of coming out (or not) in their teaching practice. The response to the call was staggering, indicating that coming out remains an ongoing concern for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) (and heterosexual) academics, or at least those based in Englishspeaking western countries. Although much has been written about coming out in the classroom since the late 1970s, including personal reflections (e.g., Cruikshank, 1982; Garber, 1994; Mintz and Rothblum, 1997), theoretical debates (e.g., articles by Khayatt, 1999, and Silin, 1999, in the journal GLQ) and empirical research (e.g., Cain, 1996; Cramer, 1997; McNaron, 1997; Waldo and Kemp, 1997), and western sociopolitical contexts have tended to become more ‘accepting’ of diverse sexualities (and genders), the question of whether to come out, or not, and how, is still clearly not one that has an easy or definitive answer.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a call for contributions asked academics across disciplines and cultural contexts to reflect on their experiences of coming out (or not) in their teaching practice, and the response to the call was staggering, indicating that coming out remains an ongoing concern for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) (and heterosexual) academics, or at least those based in Englishspeaking western countries.
Abstract: One area of self-disclosure particularly pertinent to teaching feminist psychology, women’s studies and other university subjects linked to gender and sexuality relates to sexual and gender identities and practices. Most discussions have centred on the disclosure of a lesbian or gay sexual identity in the classroom. However, ‘coming out’, or not, around sexuality and gender identity can be much more than this, and in this special feature, we revisit and aim to reinvigorate discussion of this topic. Our call for contributions asked academics across disciplines and cultural contexts to reflect on their experiences of coming out (or not) in their teaching practice. The response to the call was staggering, indicating that coming out remains an ongoing concern for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) (and heterosexual) academics, or at least those based in Englishspeaking western countries. Although much has been written about coming out in the classroom since the late 1970s, including personal reflections (e.g., Cruikshank, 1982; Garber, 1994; Mintz and Rothblum, 1997), theoretical debates (e.g., articles by Khayatt, 1999, and Silin, 1999, in the journal GLQ) and empirical research (e.g., Cain, 1996; Cramer, 1997; McNaron, 1997; Waldo and Kemp, 1997), and western sociopolitical contexts have tended to become more ‘accepting’ of diverse sexualities (and genders), the question of whether to come out, or not, and how, is still clearly not one that has an easy or definitive answer.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A critical discursive analysis of contemporary media accounts of controversial New Zealand legislation designed to provide counselling and monetary compensation to sexual abuse victims/survivors is presented in this paper, with strong emotional talk and perpetuation of a ''big scam'' discourse that positions sexual abuse survivors as potentially untrustworthy, fraudulent claimants.
Abstract: This article offers a critical discursive analysis of contemporary media accounts of controversial New Zealand legislation designed to provide counselling and monetary compensation to sexual abuse victims/survivors. Analysis of newspaper texts from 2002 to 2005 located a heated debate, with opposition to and defense of the legislation. Opposition was articulated through strong emotional talk and perpetuation of a `big scam' discourse that positions sexual abuse survivors as potentially untrustworthy, fraudulent claimants. Counsellors/therapists are positioned as part of a predatory, money-hungry industry, which uses questionable practices to create false memories or reports of sexual abuse. The persuasive function served by this emotionally laden big scam discourse has a higher profile than arguments defending the legislation. The dominance of the big scam discourse arguably contributes to the suffering of sexual abuse survivors, more often women and children, by maintaining attention on authenticity and ...

Journal ArticleDOI
Alison Crosby1
TL;DR: The systemic use of sexual violence as a weapon of war was a profound social silence during the armed conflicts in Guatemala and Peru, and in Colombia, where war rages on, women's bodies continue to continue to be violated.
Abstract: The systemic use of sexual violence as a weapon of war was a profound social silence during the armed conflicts in Guatemala and Peru, and in Colombia, where war rages on, women's bodies continue t...


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Megan and Tara as discussed by the authors conducted a semistructured interview to understand the implications of coming out in the classroom through their own reflections and by interviewing students who have been in our classes and are aware of our sexual orientations.
Abstract: In our first few years as Assistant Professors of Psychology (midway through our fourth and third years, respectively), we have found ourselves frequently discussing the issue of coming out in the classroom, probably because we are the only non-heterosexual instructors in our respective departments. This topic is of scholarly interest, as each of us is academically engaged in the critical study of gender and sexuality, and of personal interest, as we, as a queer couple, negotiate the conservative social climate of rural Pennsylvania. Much of our conversation around the dinner table has focused on the ways in which our gender presentations are taken as evidence of our sexual orientation by our students: Tara’s masculine presentation is read as lesbian, whereas Megan’s feminine appearance is read as heterosexual. In the surrounding community, Tara is regularly subject to intense glares and outright hostility, but Megan rarely is the target of homophobic remarks. Rather, Megan faces the necessity of self-disclosure in order to have her bisexual/queer sexual orientation recognized (since she is presumed heterosexual when alone, and lesbian when with Tara); that self-disclosure is frequently met with inappropriate sexual advances. This difference in our queer visibility fundamentally shapes our approaches to disclosure of our sexual orientations in the classroom. We sought to understand the implications of coming out in the classroom through our own reflections and by interviewing students who have been in our classes and are aware of our sexual orientations. Each of us conducted semistructured interviews of queer and straight students from the other’s classes; the inclusion of their perspective here provides a more complete picture of the ways in which our sexuality shapes our classrooms. Sexuality is highly relevant in Megan’s classes (Psychology of Women and Gender, Gender and Sexual

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the forced removal of the headscarf is an imposition of "universal emancipation" that further deepens social and cultural inequalities and causes women's further oppression rather than their emancipation.
Abstract: In this article, I draw on qualitative research on headscarf wearing among Dutch students of Turkish origin in Amsterdam. The aim was to give voice to Muslim girls and to critically revisit the emancipation discourse with regard to the headscarf issue in the Netherlands after the murder of the film director Theo van Gogh in 2004. My main argument is that the issue of the Muslim headscarf in the Dutch context – in which there is a growing tension between the Muslims and the non-Muslims1 – has been used to perpetuate prejudices and stereotypes about Muslim women and this issue, as a ‘cultural control’. These prejudices and stereotypes shape the discussions around headscarves in Holland, and can be seen strikingly in the views of Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a Somalian refugee who is a former member of the Dutch Parliament and the author of the script of the sensationalist 2004 film Submission, and Cisca Dresselhuys, the ex-editor-in-chief of the leading Dutch feminist magazine Opzij. Both contend that the headscarf is a symbol of Muslim women’s oppression and that principles of Islam and women’s emancipation are incompatible (Dresselhuys, 2001; Hirsi Ali, 2006). They offer a single (universal) path for the emancipation of Muslim women through removing their headscarves. I hope that by capturing the voices of Muslim women on the sources of their ‘oppression’, this research article will make a contribution to feminist and liberation psychology that focus on the ‘causes of oppression laying in the structures and ideologies that create discrimination and prejudice as the manifestations of oppression’ (Martin-Baro, 1994 cited in Moane, 2003). This research argues that the forced removal of the headscarf is an imposition of ‘universal emancipation’ that further deepens social and cultural inequalities and causes these women’s further oppression rather than their emancipation.