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JournalISSN: 2151-7363

Feminist Formations 

Johns Hopkins University Press
About: Feminist Formations is an academic journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Feminism & Women's studies. It has an ISSN identifier of 2151-7363. Over the lifetime, 1227 publications have been published receiving 15741 citations. The journal is also known as: National Women's Studies Association Journal & NWSA Journal.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss four fundamental and interpenetrating domains of feminist theory: representation, the body, identity, and activism, and suggest some critical inquiries that considering disability can generate within these theoretical arenas.
Abstract: of the body, multiculturalism, and the social formations that interpret bodily differences. The essay asserts that integrating disability as a cat- egory of analysis and a system of representation deepens, expands, and challenges feminist theory. To elaborate on these premises, the essay discusses four fundamental and interpenetrating domains of feminist theory: representation, the body, identity, and activism, suggesting some critical inquiries that considering disability can generate within these theoretical arenas. Over the last several years, disability studies has moved out of the applied fields of medicine, social work, and rehabilitation to become a vibrant new field of inquiry within the critical genre of identity studies. Charged with the residual fervor of the Civil Rights Movement, Women's Studies and race studies established a model in the academy for identity-based critical enterprises that followed, such as gender studies, queer studies, disability studies, and a proliferation of ethnic studies, all of which have enriched and complicated our understandings of social justice, subject formation, subjugated knowledges, and collective action. Even though disability studies is now flourishing in disciplines such as history, literature, religion, theater, and philosophy in precisely the same way feminist studies did twenty-five years ago, many of its practitioners do not recognize that disability studies is part of this larger undertaking that can be called identity studies. Indeed, I must wearily conclude that much of current disability studies does a great deal of wheel reinventing. This is largely because many disability studies scholars simply do not know either feminist theory or the institutional history of Women's Stud- ies. All too often, the pronouncements in disability studies of what we need to start addressing are precisely issues that feminist theory has been grappling with for years. This is not to say that feminist theory can be

734 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the United States is a settler colonial nation-state and that settler colonialism has been and continues to be a gendered process, and they argue that attending to the links between heteropatriarchy and settler colonisation is intellectually and politically imperative for all peoples living within settlercolonial contexts.
Abstract: The article explores two intertwined ideas: that the United States is a settler colonial nation-state and that settler colonialism has been and continues to be a gendered process. The article engages Native feminist theories to excavate the deep connections between settler colonialism and heteropatriarchy, highlighting five central challenges that Native feminist theories pose to gender and women’s studies. From problematizing settler colonialism and its intersections to questioning academic participation in Indigenous dispossession, responding to these challenges requires a significant departure from how gender and women’s studies is regularly understood and taught. Too often, the consideration of Indigenous peoples remains rooted in understanding colonialism as an historical point in time away from which our society has progressed. Centering settler colonialism within gender and women’s studies instead exposes the still-existing structure of settler colonialism and its powerful effects on Indigenous peoples and settlers. Taking as its audience practitioners of both “whitestream” and other feminisms and writing in conversation with a long history of Native feminist theorizing, the article offers critical suggestions for the meaningful engagement of Native feminisms. Overall, it aims to persuade readers that attending to the links between heteropatriarchy and settler colonialism is intellectually and politically imperative for all peoples living within settler colonial contexts.

441 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using Afrocentric theory and standpoint theory, the authors examines the effect of the White standard of beauty upon African American women by shedding light on the salience of the effects of beauty, body image, and hair.
Abstract: Using Afrocentric theory and standpoint theory, this article examines the effect of the White standard of beauty upon African American women. By shedding light on the salience of the effects of beauty, body image, and hair, this article questions societal definitions of beauty. Adherence to the Euro American beauty standard has had, and continues to have, devastating effects upon African American women. In addition, this standard pits African American women against the dominant cultural standard of beauty. A call to challenge the hegemonic White standard of beauty through Black beauty liberation is offered.

271 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The roots of the antifeminist backlash against ecofeminism in the 1990s, peeling back the layers of feminist and environmentalist resistance to eco-feminism's analyses of the connections among racism, sexism, classism, colonialism, speciesism, and the environment are uncovered in this article.
Abstract: Formulated in the 1980s and gaining prominence in the early 1990s, by the end of that decade ecofeminism was critiqued as essentialist and effectively discarded. Fearing their scholarship would be contaminated by association with the term "ecofeminism," feminists working on the intersections of feminism and environmentalism thought it better to rename their approach. Thirty years later, current developments in allegedly new fields such as animal studies and naturalized epistemology are "discovering" theoretical perspectives on interspecies relations and standpoint theory that were developed by feminists and ecofeminists decades ago. What have we lost by jettisoning these earlier feminist and ecofeminist bodies of knowledge? Are there features of ecofeminism that can helpfully be retrieved, restoring an intellectual and activist history, and enriching current theorizing and activisms? By examining the historical foundations of ecofeminism from the 1980s onward, this article uncovers the roots of the antifeminist backlash against ecofeminism in the 1990s, peeling back the layers of feminist and environmentalist resistance to ecofeminism's analyses of the connections among racism, sexism, classism, colonialism, speciesism, and the environment. Recuperating ecofeminist insights of the past thirty years provides feminist foundations for current liberatory theories and activisms.

267 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors analyzes recent developments in US anti-sex trafficking rhetoric and practices and argues that feminists should be the first to interrogate and critique the premises underlying many claims about global sex trafficking, as well as recent US-based efforts to rescue prostitutes.
Abstract: This article analyzes recent developments in US anti-sex trafficking rhetoric and practices In particular, it traces how pre-9/11 abolitionist legal frameworks have been redeployed in the context of regime change from the Clinton to Bush administrations In the current political context, combating the traffic in women has become a common denominator political issue, uniting people across the political and religious spectrum against a seemingly indisputable act of oppression and exploitation However, this essay argues that feminists should be the first to interrogate and critique the premises underlying many claims about global sex trafficking, as well as recent US-based efforts to rescue prostitutes It places the current raid-and-rehabilitation method of curbing sex trafficking within the broader context of Bush administration and conservative religious approaches to dealing with gender and sexuality on the international scene

244 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202318
202252
20215
20203
201932
201843