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Showing papers in "French History in 2012"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine artists' petitions in the controversy over art confiscation and argue that the artists themselves signed their petitions as a means to re-assert their status and right to patronage.
Abstract: This article examines the place of artists’ petitions in the quarrel over confiscating works of art. It argues that the dispute provided opportunities for its participants to advance a series of distinct agendas that reflected political and professional concerns rather than judgements about the art in question. By tracing the earliest stages of the quarrel and radically reinterpreting Quatremere's crucial contribution—his Letters on the Plan to Abduct the Monuments of Italy—as part of his reactionary politics, the article clarifies the meaning of the ensuing artists’ petitions. It argues that while Quatremere duped ‘insider’ artists into supporting the Papist cause by signing his petition questioning the confiscations, the artists themselves instead signed as a means to re-assert their status and right to patronage. The vituperative responses to his petition included a counter-petition supporting art confiscations; it was signed by ‘outsider’ artists, reluctant to let their more famous co-professionals monopolize the debate at their expense.

15 citations








Journal ArticleDOI

7 citations





Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the nature of Lancastrian rule in France and focused on the town of Amiens, which lay at the intersection of Valois, Burgundian and Lancastric power during the early decades of the fifteenth century.
Abstract: This article examines the nature of Lancastrian rule in France. It focuses on the town of Amiens, which lay at the intersection of Valois, Burgundian and Lancastrian power during the early decades of the fifteenth century. The article tracks the establishment and collapse of Lancastrian power in the region between 1422 and 1435, and uses the extensive administrative records for the period to understand the impact of Lancastrian rule on the political, social and economic structures of the town.