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JournalISSN: 0953-5233

Gender & History 

Wiley-Blackwell
About: Gender & History is an academic journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Masculinity & Politics. It has an ISSN identifier of 0953-5233. Over the lifetime, 1232 publications have been published receiving 12541 citations. The journal is also known as: Gender and history & Gender and history (Print).


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147 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the genealogy of such images in the mid-twentieth century, and showed how they mobilised ideologies of "rescue" while pointing away from structural (political, military and economic) explanations for poverty, famine and other disasters.
Abstract: ‘Third World’ poverty and hunger conjures up certain conventionalised images: thin children, with or without their mothers. This paper explores the genealogy of such images in the mid-twentieth century, and shows how they mobilise ideologies of ‘rescue’ while pointing away from structural (political, military and economic) explanations for poverty, famine and other disasters. These images had a counterpart in practices of transnational and transracial adoption, which became the subject of debate in the USA during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and were at least as much about symbolic debates over race as the fate of particular children. Together, these visual and familial practices made US foreign and domestic poverty policy intelligible as a debate over whether to save women and children. When they cast the USA as rescuer, they made it all but impossible to understand what US political, military or economic power had to do with creating the problem.

133 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the early modern period, the inapplicability of certain discourses of sex and violence impeded allegations of rape whilst facilitating denials of rape as discussed by the authors, and women who asserted rape (and men who spoke out in support) engendered those same discourses which incriminated them with their own semantic and expressive intent.
Abstract: In the early modern period, the inapplicability of certain discourses of sex and violence impeded allegations of rape whilst facilitating denials of rape. Women who asserted rape (and men who spoke out in support) engendered those same discourses which incriminated them with their own semantic and expressive intent. Male violence was stressed and feminine agency discursively denied in these accounts. Sex was largely occluded, except when it appeared in particular forms: when rape was conceptualised as the tragic antithesis of healthy, procreational sex; through metaphors which implied the violation of a woman's most private boundaries; and as a brutal expression of unrelenting, and often obsessive, masculine love. Rape narratives produced in legal contexts cannot provide evidence of repressed memory. But they can demonstrate how, from a position of weakness, women nevertheless attempted to negotiate their way through a web of cultural restrictions.

123 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the role of men in politics and war in the age of democratic revolutions and the history of gender and women's empowerment in the United Kingdom during the First World War.
Abstract: List of figures List of contributors Acknowledgements Preface Part I Masculinities in politics and war: Introductions 1 Masculinity in politics and war in the age of democratic revolutions, 1750-1850 - Stefan Dudink and Karen Hagemann 2 Masculinity in politics and war in the age of nation-states and World Wars, 1850-1950 - John Horne 3 Hegemonic masculinity and the history of gender - John Tosh Part II Historicising revolutionary masculinity: Constructs and contexts 4 The republican gentleman: The race to rhetorical stability in the new United States - Carroll Smith-Rosenberg 5 Masculinity, effeminacy, time: Conceptual change in the Dutch age of democratic revolutions - Stefan Dudink 6 Republican citizenship and heterosocial desire: Concepts of masculinity in revolutionary France - Joan B Landes 7 German heroes: The cult of death for the fatherland in nineteenth-century Germany - Karen Hagemann Part III Gendering the nation: Hegemonic masculinity and its Others 8 'Brothers of the Iranian race': Manhood, nationhood, and modernity in Iran c1870-1914 - Joanna de Groot 9 Hegemonic masculinity in Afrikaner nationalist mobilisation, 1934-1948 - Jacobus Adriaan du Pisani 10 Temperate heroes: Concepts of masculinity in Second World War Britain - Sonya O Rose Part IV Analysing power relations: The politics of masculinity 11 Translating needs into rights: The discursive imperative of the Australian white man, 1901-1930 - Marilyn Lake 12 Measures for masculinity: The American labor movement and welfare state policy during the Great Depression - Alice Kessler-Harris 13 Masculinities, nations, and the new world order: Gendered discourses on peacemaking and nationality in Britain, France and the United States after the First World War - Glenda Sluga Part V Including the subject: masculinity and subjectivity 14 The political man: The construction of masculinity in German Social Democracy, 1848-1878 - Thomas Welskopp 15 Making workers masculine: The (re)construction of male worker identity in twentieth-century Brazil - Barbara Weinstein 16 Maternal relations: Moral manliness and emotional survival in letters home during the First World War - Michael Roper

118 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202336
202251
202153
202035
201936
201846