scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
JournalISSN: 0966-369X

Gender Place and Culture 

Taylor & Francis
About: Gender Place and Culture is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Feminist geography & Queer. It has an ISSN identifier of 0966-369X. Over the lifetime, 1676 publications have been published receiving 44143 citations.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
Susan Hanson1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors survey the literature on gender and mobility and propose new approaches to the study of mobility and gender that will provide the knowledge base needed to inform policies on sustainable mobility.
Abstract: Feminists have long known that gender and mobility are inseparable, influencing each other in profound and often subtle ways. Tackling complex societal problems, such as sustainability, will require improved understandings of the relationships between gender and mobility. In this essay I propose new approaches to the study of mobility and gender that will provide the knowledge base needed to inform policies on sustainable mobility. Early in the essay I survey the large literature on gender and mobility, teasing out what I see as two disparate strands of thinking that have remained badly disconnected from each other. One of these strands has informed understandings of how mobility shapes gender, while the other has examined how gender shapes mobility. Work on how mobility shapes gender has emphasized gender, to the neglect of mobility, whereas research on how gender shapes mobility has dealt with mobility in great detail and paid much less attention to gender. From this overview of the literature, I identi...

525 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the notions of transgression and parody implicit in recent queer theory, particularly in the work of Judith Butler, and take a long hard look at two current dissident sexual identities, the hypermasculine "gay skinhead" and the hyperfeminine "lipstick lesbian".
Abstract: In this paper we think about the performance of sexual identities in space, and try to explore the notions of transgression and parody implicit in recent queer theory, particularly in the work of Judith Butler. To do this, we take a long hard look at two current dissident sexual identities—the hypermasculine ‘gay skinhead’ and the hyperfeminine ‘lipstick lesbian’. We describe their evolution as sexual‐outlaw styles of the 1990s, and assess the effects of their performance in spaces which are, we argue, actively constructed as heterosexual. Although we are ultimately unsure and unable to agree about what kinds of trouble these identities cause, and for whom, and where, we want to share our unease, our questions, our own troubles.

315 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that dress is an overdetermined signifier for Muslim women, illustrating the role of clothing, particularly the veil, in the discursive formation of "Muslim women". And they explore some of the possibilities for reworking dress to create alternative femininities within different spaces, focusing in particular on the construction of 'hybrid' identities and the articulation of new Muslim identities.
Abstract: This article draws upon in-depth discussions conducted with young British Muslim women to explore the ways in which embodied differences are negotiated in the construction and contestation of identity. The author argues that dress is an overdetermined signifier for Muslim women, illustrating the role of clothing, particularly the veil, in the discursive formation of 'Muslim women'. The author explores some of the possibilities for reworking dress to create alternative femininities within different spaces, focusing in particular on the construction of 'hybrid' identities and the articulation of 'new' Muslim identities.

309 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the insights and limitations within geography of Judith Butler's concept of "performativity" are explored, and a close and critical reading of Butler's theory is performed.
Abstract: This article explores the insights and limitations within geography of Judith Butler's concept of 'performativity'. As a processual, non-foundational approach to identity, many feminist and post-structuralist geographers have incorporated performativity into their work on the intersections between gender, sexuality, ethnicity, space and place. Yet few have explicitly undertaken a close and critical reading of Butler's theory. The author argues that performativity ontologically assumes an abstracted subject (i.e. abstracted as a subject position in a given discourse) and thus provides no space for theorizing conscious reflexivity, negotiation or agency in the doing of identity. Butler posits a subject abstracted from personal, lived experience as well as from its historical and geographical embeddedness. Uncritically transcribing this abstracted subject into geography limits how we can conceptualize the linkages between emerging identities, social change and spatially-embedded, intentional human practice. ...

307 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202348
202274
2021181
2020114
2019117
2018101