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Showing papers in "Geography Compass in 2022"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that these literatures center relationships, enabling an analysis that incorporates viruses and cellular processes, histories of racism, power differences, and political economy, to understand the disproportionate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Black, Brown, Indigenous, and Asian people.
Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic and state violence converged in the U.S. in 2020 highlighting the uneven distribution of illness and death. In this article, we mobilize three bodies of literature-political ecologies of health and the body, Black geographies and racial capitalism, and Black feminist work on care-to understand the disproportionate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Black, Brown, Indigenous, and Asian people, and to imagine different, more just futures. We argue that these literatures center relationships, enabling an analysis that incorporates viruses and cellular processes, histories of racism, power differences, and political economy. We conclude by taking inspiration from the uprisings and Black feminism to envision a more caring future that nurtures relationships.

11 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The concept of spatial practices as a framework for bringing them together has been proposed in this article , which can be seen within peace geographies and the spatial turn research, and they resonate with broader conversations taking place in the discipline of geography and beyond.
Abstract: Scholarship on the dynamics of peace and conflict is in the midst of a geographic renaissance. Within the discipline there is growing interest among political geographers in theorizing and exploring “geographies of peace”. At the same time, the interdisciplinary field of peace and conflict studies is experiencing a “spatial turn” whereby geographic ideas are increasingly engaged. This article provides an overview of these parallel conversations and proposes the concept of spatial practices as a framework for bringing them together. Elements of this framework can be seen within peace geographies and the spatial turn research, and they resonate with broader conversations taking place in the discipline of geography and beyond.

8 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The peri-urbanization has been widely used to describe a range of different processes that transform rural areas to a mix of rural and urban spaces in the global south as mentioned in this paper .
Abstract: The term peri-urbanization has been widely used to describe a range of different processes that transform rural areas to a mix of rural and urban spaces. Although there is a burgeoning literature on peri-urbanization, the conceptual debate about peri-urbanization's distinction from urbanization is rarely considered. It sometimes seems like whatever occurs at the urban periphery across the global south is labeled peri-urbanization. This universalizing use of the term risks obscuring the existing diversities of rural-to-urban transformations. At the same time, it is empirically clear that the urban periphery of the global south hosts the most dynamic processes of urbanization in the contemporary world. It is also conceptually accepted that to better understand these diverse processes of urbanization, scholars must decenter global urban theory and build new vocabularies and theories from the south. Thus, there is doubt as to whether and to what extent a single concept like peri-urbanization can capture the great diversity of rural-to-urban transformations across the global south. This critical review of the southern geographies of peri-urbanization first identifies three interrelated conceptual vectors (territorial, functional, and transitional) for understanding the peri-urban concept, and outlines recent developments in the field. Then, peri-urbanization is reframed as an umbrella concept, which embraces multiple theoretical concepts and avoids the universalization inherent in much current usage. Finally, the paper reviews recent theoretical inquiries and new vocabularies of urbanization processes at the urban periphery, offering scope to theorize the heterogeneity of the geographies of peri-urbanization in the global south.

7 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the role of the visual in the construction and subversion of border reconfigurations has been explored, with particular attention to the heterogeneous roles played by visual objects such as maps, photographs and videos in shaping both hegemonic and counter-hegemonic processes of borders.
Abstract: In recent years, critical border studies have developed sophisticated concepts and methodologies for exploring the multifaceted spatialities, sociologies and temporalities of contemporary borders. In this article, we consider how the “aesthetic turn” that has gained prominence in the scholarship can further inform thinking in border studies. Specifically, we focus on the role of the visual in the construction as well as subversion of borders, suggesting possible avenues for future critical aesthetics-engaged research on COVID-19 era border reconfigurations. To do so, we first briefly outline the theoretical evolution of border studies, paying attention to recent conceptualisations of borders as dynamic processes of social and spatial differentiation. We then build on the borderscapes concept to unpack research on border aesthetics, with particular attention to the heterogeneous roles played by visual objects such as maps, photographs and videos in shaping both hegemonic and counter-hegemonic processes of bordering. Finally, we bring these contributions into discussion with recent insights on the COVID-19 pandemic, sketching several ways to advance aesthetic concepts and methodologies in academic research on borderscapes that are emerging with, and will likely outlast, the pandemic. We suggest that border studies and affiliated sub-fields can gain useful insights from attending more explicitly and robustly to dynamic visual geographies of power, contestation and subversion. © 2022 The Authors. Geography Compass published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors synthesize these findings and highlight the different geographies (the self, the nation, the region, the digital) that emerge within this research and argue that new research agendas must be developed to address the meshwork of virtual space and small scale geographies in which CCOs are formed.
Abstract: Climate change can only be tackled with public support for sustainable policies. Thus, public attitudes towards climate change matter. More than 3 decades of climate change opinion (CCO) research—conducted by geographers, environmental psychologists, behavioural scientists, sociologists etc.—have provided us with a wealth of information about which predictors shape public CCOs. This review synthesises these findings and highlights the different geographies (the self, the nation, the region, the digital) that emerge within this research. Given the increased importance of social media, virtual geographies of climate change scepticism are increasingly being identified. Our paper argues that new research agendas must be developed to address the meshwork of virtual space and small scale geographies (regions, towns, districts) in which CCOs are formed.

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors introduce and categorize the existing literature on the potential rebound effects of teleworking on residential and daily mobility, and identify the major lessons, while also noticing the limits of the research and a scarcity of qualitative approaches to understand how and why people who telework reinvest their non-commuting time in other forms of mobility.
Abstract: The practice of teleworking has been growing steadily in recent years with the development of ICT and the flexibilisation of work. The Covid-19 pandemic and its stay-at-home restrictions have further accelerated this trend. As teleworking reduces the frequency of commuting, it also reduces CO2 emissions and may be seen as a tool to regulate mobility. However, and especially since working from home enables more flexible working, teleworking may have various ‘rebound‘ effects on daily and residential mobility practices. Rebound effects include possible increases in the frequency or distance of journeys, such as an increase in non-work-related travel on teleworking days, as well as effects such as residential relocation or multilocal dwelling. In this article we intend to introduce and categorize the existing literature on the potential rebound effects of teleworking on residential and daily mobility. By critically assessing the literature we have identified the major lessons, while also noticing the limits of the research and a scarcity of qualitative approaches to understand how and why people who telework reinvest their non-commuting time in other forms of mobility. Also missing in the literature is the longitudinal aspect, that is, the consideration of long-term changes. These gaps have led us to formulate our proposition of a research agenda, where the lifestyle and life course approaches have emerged as crucial tools to understanding the motivations for teleworking and the respective rebound effects on residential and daily mobility.

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the dominance of one debate on climate related conflict is the product of Imperial knowledge produced in the Global North Orientalising the Global South, and that the subaltern's lived experience and interpretation of hazards and their relationship with conflicts needs to be located and centred in this conversation, not just as that of a hapless victim but as knowledge producers able to set the agendas and re-orient the focus of this field.
Abstract: This paper suggests that the dominance of one debate on climate related conflict – establishing whether climate change leads to conflict, or not - is the product of Imperial knowledge produced in the Global North Orientalising the Global South. This debate is also one in which the subdiscipline of political geography has been inadvertently complicit by accepting positivist approaches, that erase the subject and their subjectivities from this discussion, and frame them as science. The argument in this paper problematises the fundamental understanding of ‘climate conflict’, as defined and universalised by Western science in the Western academy. Instead, it argues that the subaltern's lived experience and interpretation of hazards and their relationship with conflicts needs to be located and centred in this conversation – not just as that of a hapless victim but as knowledge producers able to set the agendas and re-orient the focus of this field. Research examining conflicts around floods and evictions begins to map a new future for how that might be possible.

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the social scientific literature on gangs can be found in this paper , concluding with a call for how to make the discipline of geography more inclusive for gang researchers who possess real-world experience with assertive place-making practices.
Abstract: Gangs are geographically oriented social entities as evidenced by the display of cardinal points in their graffiti, the use of neighborhood namesakes, a focus on territoriality as their raison d'être, as well as in the way they are policed and legally cordoned. Despite gang members' real and imagined penchant for transgressive place-making and demarcation, it has been sociologists and criminologists, not geographers, who have produced the lion's share of spatially nuanced research on gangs. In this article, I provide a review of the social scientific literature on gangs, concluding with a call for how to make the discipline of geography more inclusive for gang researchers who possess real-world experience with assertive place-making practices.

2 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors explore the intersections in the diasporic-civic space-development nexus, with further research needed to understand how diaspora communities are responding to these changes, how they reconfiguring and reconstituting themselves in this context, and what this means for global development.
Abstract: Over the last twenty years increasing attention has been paid to the ways in which diasporic communities can shape global development processes, thorough a variety of intersecting scales and spatialities. This promotion of diasporic-centred development has occurred in parallel to a narrowing of civic space and it is these juxtaposing narratives that this paper interrogates. This paper firstly considers diasporic-centred development before moving on to think about how the contemporary narrowing of civic space may be (re)shaping diasporic civic life and participation in global development processes. The paper concludes that the spaces for diasporic civic participation in development are vulnerable to being squeezed in multiple intersecting ways, including through the racialised marginalisation of diasporic communities in everyday life, restrictions on diasporic associational life, the delegitimising of diasporic organisations in the (formal) development sphere and the extra-territorial narrowing of diasporic civic space by state (and non-state) actors. It is imperative that we explore the intersections in the diasporic-civic space-development nexus, with further research needed to understand how diasporic communities are responding to these changes, how diasporic civic spaces are reconfiguring and reconstituting themselves in this context, and what this means for global development.

2 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors focus on the long-term effects of foreign direct investment (FDI) in less developed regions (LDRs) and identify different types and mechanisms of FDI in more developed regions and LDRs, which lead to different regional development outcomes.
Abstract: This article focuses on the long-term effects of foreign direct investment (FDI) in less developed regions (LDRs). It identifies different types and mechanisms of FDI in more developed regions (MDRs) and LDRs, which lead to different regional development outcomes. It critically evaluates the most important approaches to FDI in LDRs developed in economic geography, namely the branch plant economy and truncation, new regionalism, new international division of labor and spatial divisions of labor, and global production networks. In the long run, FDI tends to benefit MDRs more than LDRs. The article calls on economic geographers to continue the research on FDI in the context of uneven development.

2 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a review of recent case study literature on resettlements in river deltas is presented, grounded in a thorough review of case-study literature on resettlement that is informed by political ecology, and the review challenges positivist reductions of resettlement processes as technocratic-managerial tasks.
Abstract: In river deltas, human interference with regional and global socio-ecological systems has led to a plethora of gradual and more abrupt environmental changes that result in inundation, coastal and river bank erosion, land loss and, ultimately, displaced people. Often apolitically framed as protective, state-led transfer of people to new housing grounds, resettlement has become a common response to such displacements. In its process, existing arrangements of land tenure and occupancy and, at times more covertly, related arrangements of capital, labor and the social fabric become dislocated and reassembled. In line with emerging critical geographies of resettlement, this paper conceptualizes resettlement in river deltas against the background of environmental change as a highly political process with far-reaching environmental, economic, social and cultural implications. For this article is based on an in-depth review of both resettlement and political ecology literature, we first elucidate the concept of resettlement before providing a structured overview of categories and recent trends in resettlement literature. We then focus on river deltas that due to multi-scale environmental change are about to become hotspots of future resettlement. Building on identified gaps in resettlement literature, the article concludes with opening up three analytical strands of political ecology as entry points to resettlement studies, understood as critical geographic research into localized manifestations of environmental change in river deltas. Overall, our paper aims to initialize conceptual debate, grounded in a thorough review of recent case study literature on resettlement that is informed by political ecology. The review challenges positivist reductions of resettlement processes as technocratic-managerial tasks that so far have dominated scientific literature in this field and opens up new perspectives for critical research on resettlements in river deltas for human geographers.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors provide a state-of-the-art synthesis of the geographies of running, focusing on six key themes that characterise contemporary running geographies and demonstrate the value geography and running bring to each other: different running practices, senses, experiences and embodiment, running, space and place, events, technologies and objects.
Abstract: Running is inherently geographical, with spaces, places, movement and bodies central to the practice. Running has captured the geographical imagination over the last decade and this paper reaches across such work to provide a state-of-the-art synthesis of the geographies of running. The review is structured around six key themes that characterise contemporary running geographies and demonstrate the value geography and running bring to each other: (1) different running practices; (2) theorising and researching running; (3) senses, experiences and embodiment; (4) running, space and place; (5) events; and (6) technologies and objects. The paper concludes by considering what is next for running geographies by highlighting three new avenues: (1) further engagement with digital geographies; (2) the runnability of places; and (3) diversifying who does running geography and who it studies.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Anthropocene has thrown at us a challenge of balancing urgency and justice as discussed by the authors , which is a dilemma because we need pathways for urgent action on climate mitigation and energy transitions while centring the slow and considered work that historical and contemporary justice questions demand.
Abstract: The Anthropocene has thrown at us a challenge of balancing urgency and justice. Urgency brought about by myriad environmental crises, most prominently being climate change, and justice that any adequate response to these crises needs to be rooted in. This is a dilemma because we need pathways for urgent action on climate mitigation and energy transitions while centring the slow and considered work that historical and contemporary justice questions demand. This is because while the Anthropocene calls humans to unite, its impacts have been, are, and will be, felt differently. The Anthropocene narrative's framing of a universal humanity connects to a long and dangerous history of what is human and what qualifies as humanity, a history of colonising, racializing, and dehumanising black, brown, and indigenous bodies around the world. We need narratives of the Anthropocene that confirm the importance of decolonising political, economic, and scientific institutions, not to deny urgency, but to foster a more political Anthropocene that creates space for new narratives of justice. The question then, that this paper initiates, is: How to progress anti–and de-colonial thought for energy geographies within a somewhat colonising discourse of urgency in/of the Anthropocene? To think of energy geographies of/in the Anthropocene, one that explicitly embeds within itself justice, this paper outlines three areas of work. First, the paper proposes a need to engage with and learn from energy histories other than those from the Euro-American contexts. Second, it urges more focus on the question of difference. Third, the paper proposes a deeper engagement with critical race theory and postcolonial/decolonial theories to investigate questions of justice. These proposals are provocations to open energy geographies to a wider range of questions, approaches, and concerns.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a review essay aims to put these rather disjointed efforts into a programmatic conversation and think about how one might (re)calibrate geopolitics as an ethnographic object and agenda.
Abstract: Over the last 3 decades, while ethnography has arguably become a popular and legitimate method to study geopolitics among geographers, anthropologists have increasingly turned towards geopolitics as a popular subject to investigate former and emergent empires as everyday phenomena. Yet, their efforts remain rather disjointed. Written by an anthropologist, this review essay aims to put these rather disjointed efforts into a programmatic conversation and think about how one might (re)calibrate geopolitics as an ethnographic object and agenda. To that end, the essay first takes stock of the existing ethnographic knowledge of geopolitics through a review of selected works by geographers and anthropologists. Then, to help students and scholars of geopolitics from within these cognate disciplines move this engagement forward, the essay concludes by proposing the ‘cultures of geopolitical expertise’ as a productive avenue to recalibrate geopolitics as an ethnographic object and agenda.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors draw attention to the multi-scalar transformative potential that participation in community gardens (as a form of urban agriculture) can provide to volunteers, informed by a feminist approach and suggest that community gardens can be conceptualised as feminist spaces, given their fluidity and capacity to enable critical perspectives in volunteers, which may result in alternative forms of political action.
Abstract: In recent years, research in urban agriculture (UA) initiatives has adopted a more critical and transdisciplinary approach, proposing that UA enables shifts in socio-economic, community, environmental and urban paradigms. Following this critical agenda, this paper draws attention to the multi-scalar transformative potential that participation in community gardens (as a form of UA) can provide to volunteers, informed by a feminist approach. Firstly, we review the literature on the diverse gendered benefits, and degrees of empowerment women have experienced from working in community gardens, both individually and collectively. Examples from the literature review are informed by concepts from feminist geographies that support the exploration of community gardens as sites of embodied, relational and multi-scalar experience. Following that, we expand the discussion to review opportunities community gardens offer individuals to gain greater awareness of symbolic forms of oppression, and envision alternatives for social change, drawing on feminist geographies in ways that move ‘beyond gender’. These benefits are mostly informed by conscientisation, decolonial and feminist political ecology approaches. Finally, the paper suggests that community gardens can be conceptualised as feminist spaces, given their fluidity and capacity to enable critical perspectives in volunteers, which may result in alternative forms of political action. The paper concludes with suggestions for further critical research on UA spaces.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors present a review of existing knowledge on gender and sexual minorities and disasters, and identify areas for growth in the field of disaster geographies, and argue that progress requires increased conceptual and methodological focus on diversity and the intersectional factors that exacerbate marginality, more inclusive knowledge production pathways focussed on risk reduction, and establishing methods for LGBTQIA+ people to be involved in research about them.
Abstract: Despite growing awareness and research into experiences of gender and sexual minorities – also known as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, intersex, asexual and other identities (LGBTQIA+) – their needs and capacities are often overlooked in crisis response and disaster risk reduction. LGBTQIA+ peoples' vulnerability is shaped by social marginalisation, discrimination, and stigma, and exacerbated by dominant value systems and Western heteronormative framings of disaster experiences. We present a review of scholarship into gender and sexual minorities and disasters. We summarise extant knowledge and identify areas for growth in the field of disaster geographies. We argue that progress requires increased conceptual and methodological focus on diversity and the intersectional factors that exacerbate marginality, more inclusive knowledge production pathways focussed on risk reduction, and establishing methods for LGBTQIA+ people to be involved in research about them. More critical and inclusive research will not only aid progress in disaster geographies; it will also provide vital evidence with which to lobby policymakers and disaster management to pay closer attention to diversity and inclusion. By moving beyond normativity, cisgender-heterosexual assumptions, and homogenising identity labels, we can begin to address social, cultural, and political factors that determine spatial inequalities, marginalisation, and disaster vulnerability for gender and sexual minorities.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors explore the linkages between bodies, spaces and VR to demonstrate how engagement with VR can enrich geographical scholarship, and explore the relationship between the body and virtual reality.
Abstract: Within an ongoing debate about the relationships between the body and technological experiences within virtual reality (VR), there has hitherto been limited consideration of the spatial. Geographers, meanwhile, have only just begun to engage with VR and its spatialities but have paid less attention to its embodiment. The technology allows users to go beyond merely imagining themselves in a different world, creating a real sense of presence in the digital realm. Immersion and presence in VR are, however, a mix of space, embodiment and the digital. As such, any discussion of VR requires critical consideration of both embodiment and space. This paper therefore explores some of the linkages between bodies, spaces and VR to demonstrate how engagement with VR can enrich geographical scholarship.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a review of cycling and health and well-being in contemporary cycling geographies is presented, focusing on three key themes: cycling and neoliberalism, cycling citizenship, and everyday cycling.
Abstract: Cycling has cut across public health and policy forums in the last decade given trends in urban governance for liveability and uptake of cycling during the COVID-19 pandemic. This review discusses work that helps understand where, how, and why time spent cycling can contribute to health and well-being. The review discusses how cycling geographies offers an alternative to biomedical approaches that measure the risks versus the medical benefits of riding a bike. The paper is structured around three key themes that characterise contemporary cycling geographies (a) cycling and neoliberalism;(b) cycling citizenship;and (c) everyday cycling. The paper argues, these studies have not gone far enough in understanding the relationship between well-being and cycling. To help address this gap the review offers a 'mobile territories of well-being' framework. To conclude, consideration is given to the policy implications of a cycling geographies research agenda engaging with a mobile territories of well-being framework.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors trace the ways in which justice has been theorized within human geography and identify commonalities among justice applications within geography, suggesting a shift beyond distributive and ideal theories of justice toward those explicating injustices coming more from bottom-up approaches.
Abstract: Justice has long been central to geographic research but attention to the concept itself has been less explicitly theorized within the discipline. This article specifically traces the ways in which justice has been theorized within human geography. The review identifies commonalities among justice applications within geography, suggesting a shift beyond distributive and ideal theories of justice toward those explicating injustices coming more from bottom-up approaches. At the same time, it identifies the tendency of geographers to approach the concept of justice through normative-political approaches rather than normative-analytical justifications of socio-spatial phenomena. The paper illustrates the value of both approaches to justice theorizing but cautions that geographers should continue to justify the use of the concept within their work to avoid attenuating it. In ending, the paper illustrates how justice-oriented geographers can continue to identify why justice is central to their scholarship.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a critical review of dominant futuring approaches and insights from critical perspectives are provided to help shape fairer futuring in geographical research, highlighting the limitations of current approaches.
Abstract: Abstract Futures thinking is an expanding interdisciplinary field which is seen as a key element of transitioning towards a more sustainable planet and society. Developing fairer futuring is increasingly urgent in the context of the radical reconfiguration of current systems needed to meet complex global sustainability challenges. However, explicit consideration of uneven power and participation and the nature‐society relations that feature in contemporary futuring processes has been given little explicit attention to date. This deficit is addressed in this paper through a critical review of dominant futuring approaches and outlining insights from critical perspectives which (a) identify limitations of current futuring approaches and (b) provide important perspectives to help shape fairer futuring in geographical research.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors call on geographers to take beauty, and its spatialities, seriously and center the powerful work of beauty in three connected arenas: nationalism, militarism, and development.
Abstract: The work of beauty—in disciplining bodies, imagining nations, driving globalized commodity networks, and fostering booming tourist industries, for example, is a vibrant area of research across the Humanities and Social Sciences. However, an understanding of the complex ideologies, material objects, and practices of beauty remain undeveloped in our field. In this article we call on geographers to take beauty, and its spatialities, seriously. We center the powerful work of beauty in three connected arenas, each of long-held interest to political geographers: nationalism, militarism, and development. For each we engage analyses of beauty from beyond our discipline. Drawing on our own research and that of a limited, but growing, body of geographers, we point to the instructive openings a feminist geographic approach to beauty, widely imagined but always grounded in power, offers.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors argue for conceptual clarification and suggest differentiation of types of ethnogenesis and diasporas, focusing on the relationship between ethnogenesis, the emergence of an ethnic group, and the evolution of new hybridities and identities.
Abstract: Ethnogenesis, the emergence of an ethnic group, is pivotal to understand ethnic communities and diasporas, specifically the variety of place attachments, new forms of home and place-making and the emergence of new hybridities and identities. Despite its obvious relevance, geographers have devoted much less attention to ethnogenesis. Moreover, in all disciplines, the concept of ethnogenesis is used in different ways, while the relationship between ethnogenesis and diaspora is practically absent. This article argues first for conceptual clarification and suggests differentiation of types of ethnogenesis and diasporas; second, to focus on the relationship between ethnogenesis and diaspora; and, third, to broaden the focus to include the environment in accounting for ethnogenesis and diasporas.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors provide an overview of economic development studies of collaboration and suggest ways that geographers might use concepts from that scholarship to inform and extend the limited number of studies exploring site selection practices.
Abstract: Site selection processes whereby companies choose a location for an expansion or relocation have changed substantially over the past several decades. One key shift has been the emergence of collaboration among both individual economic developers and cooperation among the communities they represent. The rise in collaborative practices has also been increasingly reflected in the contemporary economic development literature outside the discipline of geography. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of economic development studies of collaboration and then to suggest ways that geographers might use concepts from that scholarship to inform and extend the limited number of studies exploring site selection practices. The paper begins by offering a context for the emergence of collaboration trends by highlighting the ways that information asymmetry in site selection processes create a demand for greater collaboration among industry practitioners. It then turns to an overview of the burgeoning literature on collaboration that has evolved over the last decade in the interdisciplinary scholarship on economic development. Next, the paper shifts to a discussion of the ways that geographers might use the literature on collaboration to inform studies of site selection, specifically focusing on geographic scale and research on site selection consultants as possible areas for future investigation. The article concludes by arguing that studying collaboration in the context of geographies of site selection holds the potential for greater insights into the broader outcomes of economic development.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the case of resilience within skateboarding, a cultural practice that champions participation and community values despite its ongoing incorporation into the neoliberal sport system, and argues that sport has come to mirror and reinforce its logics, placing emphasis on individualised competition and ultimately contributing to the reproduction of neoliberal hegemony more generally.
Abstract: This paper argues that research on sporting cultures can illuminate wider debates over the power relations materialised through the fields of cultural practice. Specifically, as neoliberalism has spread across the social realm, sport has come to mirror and reinforce its logics, placing emphasis on individualised competition and ultimately contributing to the reproduction of neoliberal hegemony more generally. Within this, however, alternative movement-based practices have emerged that show resilience to this process, offering alternative futures and new ways of being that are not organised by injustice. This paper examines the case of resilience within skateboarding, a cultural practice that champions participation and community values despite its ongoing incorporation into the neoliberal sport system.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a critical intervention into recent geographical debates on racial capitalism, interrogating the role that Housing Associations (HAs), the main form of UK social housing, play in its (re)production, is provided.
Abstract: This paper provides a critical intervention into recent geographical debates on racial capitalism, interrogating the role that Housing Associations (HAs), the main form of UK social housing, play in its (re)production. Housing Associations are institutional, third-sector spaces within which novel forms of financialisation and bordering take place. Race is central to these processes, but insufficient critical attention has been afforded to the intersections of class, race, and migratory status in extant research on UK HAs. Moreover, existing research into housing and racial capitalism is provincial in its North American focus, typically examining home ownership and private renting. We argue this is a significant lacuna given that new and multiple forms of racialised exclusion, inequality, and extraction cohere in social housing. There is accordingly a pressing need for a robust interrogation of racial capitalisms through UK HAs, and of the role of HAs via the conceptual lens of racial capitalism. In concluding, the paper argues for a new focus on ‘actually existing’ racial capitalisms, and the need for detailed analyses of the logics and practices of racial capitalisms across a variety of sites and scales, helping debates move beyond their conceptual heartland in North America.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of existing literature on China's new cities focusing on their functions as sites of accumulation, economic restructuring, globalization, territorialization, and innovation can be found in this paper .
Abstract: In recent decades, hundreds of new cities have been built in China with a notable acceleration of this trend in the 2000s. Yet despite their numbers and variety, China’s new cities remain marginal to a wave of popular and scholarly attention directed at new towns and new cities globally. This article brings China’s new cities into these conversations through review of extant literature on the topic. Research on China’s new cities has focused on their functions as sites of accumulation, economic restructuring, globalization, territorialization, and innovation. In this article, we introduce these themes in the literature and show areas that remain ripe for future study.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that framing homelessness through beauty standards and embodiment enables a new and more nuanced understanding of homelessness, which is not only gendered, but also allows for the acknowledgement of other intersectional difference, such as race, age, sexuality, and disability.
Abstract: Mainstream society expects women to look and behave in particular ways. Women are expected to adhere to conventional Western beauty standards of grooming, fashionable clothing, and hygiene. They are also traditionally associated with the home, homemaking and being indoors. The bodies of homeless women transgress in both ways: through lacking the resources to engage in the body work which would allow them to adhere to the beauty standards; and through lacking a home and predominantly being outdoors. This in turn, results in particular stigmatization for homeless women, who have unique experiences of homelessness. A lack of gendered literature has left many of these experiences underdiscussed, and even those approaches which do focus on gender, rarely account for other social differences such as race, age, and sexuality. This paper extends existing debates by arguing that framing homelessness through beauty standards and embodiment enables a new and more nuanced understanding of homelessness, which is not only gendered, but also allows for the acknowledgement of other intersectional difference, such as race, age, sexuality, and disability. It concludes that future research into homelessness should not only account for gender but should take an intersectional approach to consider the ways that homelessness is not one universal experience.

OtherDOI

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the purpose and relevance of the thought of the French philosopher, Michel Serres, is discussed, and a survey of recent secondary literature about his works in geography, social science, literary and humanities subjects is presented.
Abstract: In pondering the purpose and relevance of the thought of the French philosopher, Michel Serres, this article surveys recent secondary literature about his works in geography, social science, literary and humanities subjects. Where they are thought to be helpful, the article includes some biographical details. It first discusses Serres's prescience as a philosopher of the ecological and climate crises and the Anthropocene. It then considers his democratization of knowledge and knowledge making by analysing aspects of his particular narrative style which was designed to both speak across academic disciplinary boundaries and communicate with wider demographics. Notable amongst the latter are the symbolic mythical, human and more-than-human stock characters that recurred in his thought, speech and writings. The article then gathers together the topographical features and locations which serve as metaphors in his works. Lastly, it considers Serres's legacy as a philosopher of the digital age.