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Showing papers in "Gifted Child Quarterly in 1980"


Journal ArticleDOI
Robert S. Albert1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors show how the family position of gifted children can put them in alignment with selected family experiences, socialization, and motivations that help prepare them for particular careers; secondly, they show that often an unanticipated event such as the death of older siblings and/or a parent is not necessarily an impediment to this growth but can be an opportunity and a challenge to healthy ego development.
Abstract: There are two basic transformations in the achievement of eminence. The first is that of intellectual giftedness to creative giftedness (Albert, 1979); the second, even more important, is the transformation of this intelligent creativeness into a combination of talent, drive, and values that &dquo;succeed.&dquo; The transformation of early giftedness into adult eminence is one of the most enthralling and secretive processes of human development. Because its occurrence is relatively difficult to predict, it does not mean one should appeal to shopworn explanations such as &dquo;luck,&dquo; &dquo;breaks,&dquo; &dquo;knowing the right people,&dquo; &dquo;genius,&dquo; or other cliche. The attainment of eminence, although difficult to predict, is not without rational, developmental aspects (Albert, 1975). In this paper I wish to show how the family position of gifted children can put them in alignment with selected family experiences, socialization, and motivations that help prepare them for particular careers; secondly, I wish to show that often an unanticipated event such as the death of older siblings and/or a parent is not necessarily an impediment to this growth but can be an opportunity and a challenge to healthy ego development. The means and the direction in which these traumatic experiences influence

111 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Terman et al. as mentioned in this paper introduced the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test and Genetic Studies of Genius (GSG) to identify and select the gifted students for the United States Armed Forces.
Abstract: course of his investigations on heredity, Galton recognized a need for measuring the characteristics of related and unrelated persons. In gathering information concerning the origin and development of the trait &dquo;genius,&dquo; he discovered that the incidence of superior intellectual achievement occurred more frequently in some families than in others, and thereby concluded that the trait of genius, like other traits, was worthy of scientific investigation. Terman initiated the gifted movement in the United States during the early years of this century with the introduction of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test and Genetic Studies of Genius (Terman, 1925; Terman & Oden, 1959). Yet it was not until the later 1950’s, when Russia launched its first Sputnik, that American educators paid serious attention to instructional programs for the gifted. The desire to maintain the nation’s military superiority by identifying and nurturing competent students for careers in the applied sciences provided the impetus that educators needed in order to establish formal provisions and procedures for the identification, selection, and placement of such students.

75 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the literature concerning the gifted, the talented, and highly creative reveals that their unique personal characteristics include being: (a) critical, (b) independent of thought and judgement, and (c) persistent (Torrance, 1965; Feldhusen, Treffinger, & Elias, 1969) as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Much of the research conducted among the gifted, the talented, and the highly creative reveals that their unique personal characteristics include being: (a) critical, (b) independent of thought and judgement, and (c) persistent (Torrance, 1965; Feldhusen, Treffinger, & Elias, 1969). Of those enumerated traits, only persistence is one of the 18 elements identified in the publications that indicate how individuals tend to learn (Dunn & Dunn, 1978). The literature concerning the gifted is devoid of information that describes how that special group responds to the

68 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: GOWAN as mentioned in this paper reviewed the nature of underachievement among gifted children and pointed out the pervasiveness of the child's difficulties in school psychologists and other special services personnel who work with exceptional children.
Abstract: an intellectually gifted child does experience personalsocial adjustment or academic problems, the situation can be extremely frustrating for persons attempting to intervene and help the child. Because of recent state and federal legislation, public schools are having to identify and appropriately educate gifted children. For school psychologists and other special services personnel who work with exceptional children, the gifted child with problems poses special challenges. Gowan, in two excellent articles published over 20 years ago, reviewed the nature of underachievement among gifted children (Gowan, 1955, 1957). His underscoring of the pervasiveness of the child’s difficulties continues

49 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The question that is continually being raised, however, is whether the movement will grow and prosper, or whether it will once again fade into obscurity as has happened so many times in the past as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: only universal characteristic of the future. The decade beginning now is an especially important time for such reflection because we are in the midst of enjoying the strongest amount of acceptance and public support that has ever been accorded to the gifted child movement in America. The question that is continually being raised, however, is whether the movement will grow and prosper, or whether it will once again fade into obscurity as has happened so many times in the past. The answer to this question is obviously very complex, and yet at the same time it

46 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Super Saturday as discussed by the authors is a special program for gifted students, which was created in the early 1970s to meet some basic and unique needs of gifted children and the ways these needs may be met by a program model like Super Saturday.
Abstract: A third grader reported to her parents that Super Saturday would be perfect if she just did not have to go to regular school during the week. A seventh-grade boy became so enamored of his computer that only when the power plug was pulled could he be induced to leave the classroom. These children were enrolled in a special program for gifted students called &dquo;Super Saturday.&dquo; What is Super Saturday? How did it come into existence? What is unique about the program? This article is a description of this special program from its inception and design through implementation and evaluation. We will particularly focus on some basic and unique needs of gifted children and the ways these needs may be met by a program model like Super Saturday. Gifted children have particular needs that cannot be met by ordinary school experiences. Our own work with the gifted over a period of years and our discussions in numerous seminars led us to formulate a set of needs which seem to be basic for gifted students. These needs

36 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyze the occupational or vocational condition of women from a historical point of view and offer some recommendations for amelioration of this condition, which is a major concern with respect to gifted females.
Abstract: Relatively little has been published about the underachievement of gifted women or the ambiguous situations confronting them (Shakeshaft & Palmieri, 1978). A major concern with respect to gifted females is their attitude toward utilizing their abilities in order to attain success. For an advocate of gifted females, there is a duty to express the needs of and recommendations for this group. The purposes of this paper are to analyze the occupational or vocational condition of women from a historical point of view and to offer some recommendations for amelioration of this condition.

34 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The SAT-M, SAT-V, and SAT-E tests have been used to identify mathematically apt youths (George & Solano, 1976); see as discussed by the authors for a review.
Abstract: to identify mathematically apt youths (George & Solano, 1976). Students in the seventh and eighth grades (if underage) qualify to enter a SMPY talent search by scoring at or above the 97th percentile on the mathematics portion of a standardized achievement test. Entrants are required to take the College Board’s Scholastic Aptitude Tests, Mathematics (SAT-M), Verbal (SAT-V), and, since 1978, the Test of Standard Written English (Angoff, 1971), and

32 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the 1960's the United States seemed to be on the forefront of world creativity as mentioned in this paper, and scientists were making important breakthroughs... landing on the moon... productive inventions... upswings in creativity research.
Abstract: In the 1960’s the United States seemed to be on the forefront of world creativity. Our scientists were making important breakthroughs... landing on the moon ... productive inventions... upswings in creativity research. Important changes were being made in the curriculum and textbooks, and the national climate for creativity seemed to be improving. But now, these trends are being reversed. In 1978, patents issued to residents of the United States declined to the lowest point in 15 years (Michaels, 1979). Our trade deficit rose to $28 million in 1978 and it is predicted that it will be worse for 1979. Our productivity of goods and services is continuing to decline. Thus, we have a national problem of underachievement similar to the problem of underachievement that has been of concern for many years among those interested in the education of gifted and talented students.

31 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Robert S. Albert1
TL;DR: The development of eminent careers appears to involve a number of family variables and to require at least two major, infrequently occurring transformations as mentioned in this paper : cognitive giftedness into creative ability and the transformation of this ability to an even rarer, wellbalanced set of creative skills, values, and motivations that make up and sustain a highly committed, sharply focused, socially responsible and personal lifestyle of cognitive and creative activity.
Abstract: in their antecedents and longitudinal in their development. They are not matters of luck or genius. The behavioral makeup of eminence is definable, although not well understood in terms of its development (Albert, 1975, 1978). The development of eminent careers appears to involve a number of family variables and to require at least two major, infrequently occurring transformations : cognitive giftedness into creative ability and the transformation of this ability to an even rarer, wellbalanced set of creative skills, values, and motivations that make up and sustain a highly committed, sharply focused, socially responsible and personal lifestyle of cognitive and creative activity. These transformations occur first within the family, and eventually outside of it. Research suggests that almost all well-documented eminent careers involve persons who were cognitively gifted youths (Cox, 1926; Walberg, Rasher, & Hase, 1978). That not all cognitively gifted children are also exceptionally creative (Butcher, 1968; Wallach, 1971) or become eminent in their

30 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, general developmental stage theory, suitable modifications for the gifted child, and three Paramount Issues for Educators for the Gifted, namely: creativity is the objective of talent development, the dynamics of developmental process is necessary for this development, and developmental stage theory is a necessary part of developmental dynamics.
Abstract: are regarded as obvious: (a) creativity is the objective of talent development; (b) the dynamics of developmental process is necessary for this development; and (c) developmental stage theory is a necessary part of developmental dynamics. Accordingly, we shall proceed with: General Developmental Stage Theory; Suitable Modifications for the Gifted Child; and Three Paramount Issues for Educators for the Gifted, namely:

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article pointed out that the main obstacle to the initiation of adequate educational opportunities for this large group of students is not economic but rather attitudinal factors as the primary source of difficulty, and that even modest expenditures for programs for highly able children are implicitly (sometimes, explicitly) among the lowest priorities for school systems.
Abstract: Why is this so? One would think that the cumulative effect of over 50 years of attention, effort, and research devoted to this topic would have been a massive change in the orientation of the educational establishment, and a concomitant change in practice. Although economic considerations have frequently been cited as a major obstacle to the initiation of adequate educational opportunities for this large group of students, the evidence points towards attitudinal factors as the primary source of difficulty. The most compelling evidence that economics is a secondary rationalization rather than a primary cause is the failure of schools to vigorously pursue cost-free (or nearly so) alternatives for these children, such as acceleration through grade-skipping, subject-matter acceleration, early entrance, advanced placement, and so on. Opposition to these administrative remedies is almost by definition based on opinion and attitudes, because the findings from well-designed research studies are unanimous in their support of the benefits of accelerative altnrnatives, both academically and socio-emotionally (George, Cohn, & Stanley, in press; Stanley, Keating, & Fox, 1974; Keating, 1976). The second kind of evidence that attitudirial factors are the major obstacle to progress is that even modest expenditures for programs for highly able children are implicitly (sometimes, explicitly) among the lowest priorities for school systems. The argument that schools would very much like to do something for this group but just cannot afford it really means that such help has lower priority than all the other things on which schools do spend money. A simple listing of all expenditures for most school districts would be quite revealing in terms of what priority, in deed rather than in word, is placed on developing an adequate educational program for the academically able. Let us for the moment then accept the thesis that the major problem in establishing useful programs for these children is not economic but rather attitudinal. What are the attitudes creating the greatest hindrance, and are they in any way malleable? Others have analyzed this issue previously (e.g., Bereiter, 1976), and a number of societal attitudes have been frequently cited as running counter to the development of effective programs (e.g., antiintellectualism, egalitarianism, conformity). Rather than reiterate those analyses, I will focus on two areas which

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of studies concerning possible relationships of the achievement levels of gifted students to their standing on affective variables or to their creative potentialities can be found in this article, with a focus on the negative consequences of gifted children who achieve far below their potential capabilities.
Abstract: Although educators have been concerned about the sociological and psychological consequences of gifted children who achieve far below their potential capabilities, relatively few research investigations have been reported concerning possible relationships of the achievement levels of gifted students to their standing on affective variables or to their creative potentialities. In a review of studies

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a model of parent-school involvement in furthering the educational development of gifted students, where the major premise is that the involvement of parents in the education of their gifted child can be a significant positive force.
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to present a model of parent-school involvement in furthering the educational development of gifted students. The major premise is that the involvement of parents in the education of their gifted child can be a significant positive force. In order for parents to effectively participate in this educational venture the cooperation and support of school personnel are needed. While many of the ideas presented in this

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a study was conducted on Mexican-American students in special education programs for the gifted, focusing on their ability to demonstrate high level convergent thinking abilities and the potential for future high level intellectual and creative contribution to perform at their highest levels.
Abstract: main criterion for admission to special education programs for the gifted. Thus, by implication, giftedness is defined predominately as the demonstration of high level convergent thinking abilities. The validity of this assumption has begun to be questioned in some areas, especially in reference to the penalties such culturally loaded verbal assessment devices place on culturally different students (Bernal, 1973; Bernal & Reyna, 1975). For this study it was assumed that giftedness embraces more than just high level convergent thinking abilities. It was assumed that the ultimate goal of special education programs for the gifted is to aid students who show the greatest potential for future high level intellectual and creative contribution to perform at their highest levels. Within this context, the study was further limited to students of Mexican-American backgrounds, since such students appeared to be receiving the least support from the present assessment procedures. The study was thus designed to provide tools with which

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the effects of participation and non-participation in a community-based career education program for gifted and talented high school students on post high school career planning and direction were studied.
Abstract: An exemplary program at Texas A&M University permitted gifted and talented high school seniors from A&M Consolidated High School in College Station, Texas, to participate in a triadic experiment in career education (Colson, Borman, & Nash, 1978). This community-based model incorporated a guidance laboratory with mentorship and internship experiences. A study was designed to measure the effects of participation and nonparticipation in the community-based career education program for gifted and talented high school students on post high school career planning and direction. In addition, the study attempted to identify information that is deemed critical for the facilitation of the career development process of gifted and talented students. The yield can be used for administrative planning of career education for this subpopulation. This research was conducted during the winter and spring of the 1978-79 school year. The methodology of the study is explained below in a discussion of the subjects, the instrumentation, the procedure, and the design and statistical analyses.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Mentor Academy Program (MAP) as mentioned in this paper is a guide for involving mentors as an integral part in the education of the gifted/talented, and for training the gifted or talented to be mentors.
Abstract: The Mentor Academy Program (MAP) is a guide for involving mentors as an integral part in the education of the gifted/talented, and for training the gifted/talented to be mentors. The aim of the program reflects an increasing need for the community and the learner to participate as equal partners in the leaming process. A conseruer consciousness is evolving for the 80’s which challenges designing and developing imaginative

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The positive self-integrating force of creativity is presented by Kubie (1958) as an essential ingredient in mental health, and Flach (1978) notes that a person is often required to change one's perception about oneself or the situation as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: verse and changing stimuli, as well as the recognition of novel associations among those stimuli. Carl Rogers (1976) defines creativity as &dquo;the ability to play spontaneously with ideas, colors, shapes, relationships-to juggle elements into impossible juxtapositions&dquo; (p. 301). Similarly, Mednick (1962) sees creation as a bringing together of events that are remotely associated with each other. Because of the complexity and irregularity of modern life, this ability to &dquo;juggle elements&dquo; is a desirable attribute for day-to-day coping. Many researchers and theorists have written of the importance of creativity for psychological health. The positive self-integrating force of creativity is presented by Kubie (1958) as an essential ingredient in mental health. He believes that only highly integrated persons can disorganize and reorganize their thinking and behavior in accordance with changing life circumstances. Flach (1978) notes that in handling stress, a person is often required to change one’s perception about oneself or the situation

Journal ArticleDOI
Edwin Gordon1
TL;DR: A test of music aptitude specifically designed for use with children from kindergarten through grade three, ages five through eight, was developed over the past eight years and published in 1979 as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: identifying musically precocious children. There has been available since 1965, however, a music aptitude test with substantial longitudinal validity for use with students of nine years and older (Gordon, 1965). Historically, interest in the gifted and talented seems to have centered on the very young child, and even today attention is being focused on the preschool child. It is with that in mind that a new test of music aptitude specifically designed for use with children from kindergarten through grade three, ages five through eight, was developed over the past eight years and published in 1979 (Gordon).2

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a theoretical analysis of the nature of giftedness and the types of instruction appropriate for the gifted, based on sound empirical research, and propose that the use of a single cutoff IQ score be eliminated.
Abstract: able. An assortment of techniques based upon such materials combined with a light sprinkling of miscellaneous &dquo;theory&dquo; cannot produce a defensible program. What programs need are clearly explicated theoretical statements as to the nature of giftedness and the types of instruction appropriate for the gifted. Such theoretical statements ought to be based, in part, on sound empirical research. Renzulli is also correct in proposing that the use of a single cutoff IQ score be eliminated. For example, in east-

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on curriculum content and classroom organization for the gifted in mathematics programs at the elementary school level and suggest that the importance of thinking and learning skills should be emphasized in a gifted mathematics program.
Abstract: mum impact this mathematics model should be embedded in a system-wide program for the gifted. The focus in this paper is on curriculum content and classroom organization. Almost without exception, mathematics programs at the elementary school level are heavily computationally oriented. The many algorithms associated with computation generally are of little challenge to gifted pupils and provide little opportunity for interesting and challenging activities. While a computationally correct solution is important, thinking and learning skills should be emphasized in a gifted mathematics program. Because of previous school emphasis on rule-oriented behavior and routine practice, gifted students tend to expect to achieve a high percentage correct on every paper. This mental set often causes gifted students to shy away from problem-solving activities where the approach is not immediately obvious. Gifted pupils often exhibit reluctance in approaching divergent thinking activities, preferring instead to be told the answer which is then filed away in a very able memory so that high accuracy can be maintained. The topics explored will often involve learning from incorrect solutions, and often a sense of ambiguity in answers to extremely complex problem exists. It is essential that the students not perceive these efforts as failures on their part. The preference for product over process as the central focus of gifted students is quite disturbing considering the abilities of the students. These persons are the individuals that society expects to take the lead in solving difficult problems of a highly divergent nature; problems which require excellence in thinking and learning skills. Gifted and talented children are typically performing two to five grade levels above their actual grade placement. Martinson (1972) implies that if the child is working on the same material as the rest of the class, the child is in

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wavrik and Wavrik as mentioned in this paper discussed the ideas of a math club at Skyline Elementary School in Solana Beach, California, which was a joint venture by themselves, their wives, and the principal of the school.
Abstract: *The ideas discussed in this article were originally developed for a math club at Skyline Elementary School in Solana Beach, California. The club was a joint venture by myself, my wife Mary Wavrik, and Stephen Ludwiczak, the principal of the school. Dr. Charlotte Malone was instrumental in the establishment of the Math Course through the University of California Extension Program, allowing a much more extensive program to be developed. Any form of instruction rests, either explicitly or implicitly, on a philosophy or attitude toward the subject on the part of those designing curricula and teaching it. Standard school mathematics instruction evolved at a time when mathematics played a less vital role in society than at present. This article attempts to make as sharp a contrast as possible between two sets of philosophies and attitudes.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For example, during the 1961-62 school year, the Greenwich (Connecticut) Public Schools initiated a new program for gifted elementary school students as discussed by the authors. But the program was located in a suburban district of medium size (9,500 enrollment).
Abstract: Although the gifted appear to be receiving adequate attention in the literature, longitudinal studies have been underrepresented. Terman’s (1925-1959) classic work is a well-known example, but beyond that there is very little. Investigations have tended to emphasize individual case studies, perhaps partly due to the obvious reason that too few programs have been in existence long enough to develop a longitudinal study. Another conclusion is that too many programs take for granted the implicit assumptions underlying gifted programming. During the 1961-62 school year, the Greenwich (Connecticut) Public Schools initiated a new program for gifted elementary school students. The program is located in a suburban district of medium size (9,500 enrollment) with

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The issue of elitism in the area of giftedness has been a hot topic in the last few decades as discussed by the authors, with controversy arising over definition, funding, program design, and evaluation of the giftedness of individuals.
Abstract: All society benefits from the offerings of gifted and talented individuals. The late President Kennedy reminded us that our general welfare is dependent upon leaders coping with problems of inequities in standards of living and the woeful neglect of a continued growth in our cultural level: &dquo;It is a time for a new generation of leadership to cope with new problems and new opportunities. For there is a new world to be won.&dquo; In almost every aspect of life, we must utilize the intellectual talent, creative talent, and critical judgment of the gifted, yet as Lilly (1979) points out, the area of giftedness has seen continuing controversy. This controversy involves definition, funding, program design, and the ongoing issue of elitism. The question of elitism was notably stated by John Gardner and reported by Tannenbaum (1972) as follows:

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The seventh year (1977-78) of the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) was one of the busiest and most productive up to that point.
Abstract: The seventh year (1977-78) of the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) was its busiest and most productive up to that point. Activities moved rapidly in four areas, called the D4 fronts: Discovery (finding the talented), Description (further study of the ablest of them), Development (helping the talent-search participants educationally), and Dissemination (helping others use SMPY’s principles, practices, and programs). The fifth annual mathematics talent search was conducted. The highest-scoring 15% of its 2800 students were tested further. Many things were done to facilitate the educational development of a large number of the approximately 7000 mathematically talented youths SMPY has identified thus far. SMPY’s principles, practices, techniques, and programs were disseminated across the country and abroad. Many students not in the talent search’s geographical area (the Middle Atlantic States) were also reached. In this article the breadth and depth of SMPY’s emphasis on educational acceleration of youths who reason unusually well mathematically and are eager to move ahead will be discussed.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article pointed out that measures of intelligence and creativity, whether derived from formal tests or teacher's ratings, tend to be positively correlated and questioned whether such approaches do much more than reiterate that more able people perform better on most cognitive tasks than less able ones.
Abstract: Work on the psychological processes which might be specific to highly gifted children has tended to be dominated by the concept of the IQ. This predominance has only been marginally affected by research on creativity which attempts to distinguish an analytic or convergent form of intelligence from a divergent or associational form. One difficulty has been that measures of intelligence and creativity, whether derived from formal tests or teacher’s ratings, tend to be positively correlated. It can be questioned whether such approaches do much more than reiterate that more able people perform better on most cognitive tasks than less able ones. Although Wallach (1970) and Vernon, Adamson, and Vernon (1977) have supported the idea of a positive relationship between creativity and intelligence, Wallach and Kogan (1965) had previously expressed a different opinion, claiming that creativity can be identified as orthogonal to intelligence. Guilford (1967) has also emphasized the importance of divergent thinking in relation to giftedness

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: From kindergarten to college, most classrooms contain students who learn at different rates as discussed by the authors, for diverse reasons, operate at a low level of achievement, while the average students have some of the same needs as the low achievers but are better able to learn.
Abstract: From kindergarten to college, most classrooms contain students who learn at different rates. Some students, ’ for diverse reasons, operate at a low level of achievement. The average students have some of the same needs as the low achievers, but are better able to learn. The few gifted students have no trouble learning content. Teachers need ways to educate all levels of students without boring the fast learners and without swamping the slow learners. However, before discussing a strategy which has demonstrated this capacity, let’s examine what learning is and what various levels of students can and cannot do.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The first step in setting up such a program is to evaluate each student's functional abilities in each aspect of reading and writing as mentioned in this paper, and the unit work encourages a youngster to develop his/her own categories in observing similarities and differences in the materials studied.
Abstract: esses, grade levels, and administrative organization; it may be applied with equal success to self-contained or mainstreamed classrooms. The evaluation process has been developed within a specific conceptual framework. The premises which underlie the model are: 1. The goal of the language program for gifted children is to enable them to think and to act creatively. 2. Creative thought and action are predicated upon a basic language education which emphasizes both skill and advanced thinking ability in all aspects of reading and writing. 3. The first step in setting up such a program is to evaluate each student’s functional abilities in each aspect of reading and writing. 4. An ideal vehicle for such a program is the unit, which permits basic skills to be taught within a meaningful context. Unit work encourages a youngster to’develop his/ her own categories in observing similarities and differences in the materials studied.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For example, Reality Therapy (RT) has been used successfully by teachers, counselors, and administrators, and has resulted in increased involvement of both teachers and students, reduced disciplinary problems, enhanced school performance, and greater development of a successful identity for students.
Abstract: tors have been hesitant to work with the gifted. Some believe that since the gifted have superior ability, they have no problems; other teachers may fear that they lack specialized skills which are required in order to work effectively with such children. These statements are often inaccurate. In fact, the gifted may not be able to develop and achieve their highest potential unless they are identified and receive special assistance. Although the same wide range of problems will be found among gifted children as among average children, gifted children may also have unique problems which result from being gifted. Since it is important that teachers and counselors increase their contact with the gifted, the purpose of this paper is to suggest reality therapy (Glasser, 1965) as an example of methods and techniques that educators can use in order to work more effectively with gifted individuals. Reality therapy (RT) has been used successfully by teachers, counselors, and administrators, and has resulted in increased involvement of both teachers and students, reduced disciplinary problems, enhanced school performance, and greater development of a &dquo;success identity&dquo; for students (Glasser, 1969, 1972; Treat & Bormaster, 1979). In addition, the principles of RT can be learned. One is not required to be a therapist in order to put them into practice (Glasser, 1965). A fundamental assumption of RT is that the single basic need of every person is the requirement for an identity; all individuals need to believe that they are worthwhile and important. According to Glasser (1969), this successful identity is achieved through love (social responsibility in the school) and self-worth. Since school is a child’s major experience in growing up, it should provide a chance to give and receive love, as well as a chance to become educated, to be productive, and to experience self-worth. If the schools do not provide ways for each child to fulfill this basic need for a successful identity, the student may withdraw and develop a failure identity. This has meaning, for example, in the problem of underachievement, which Ziv (1977) believes to be paramount among the problems of the intellectually gifted. The basic principles of RT (Glasser, 1972) are involvement, focusing on present behavior, evaluating behavior, planning responsible behavior, commitment, accepting no excuses, and eliminating punishment. Each of these will be discussed briefly in relation to working with gifted students.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors of the Pygmalion play made the mistake of phrasing their request: &dquo;Can we present our play, "Pygmalions"?&dqo; Shaw promptly posted his response: "You may, but I doubt if you can."
Abstract: Mabel Davidson, distinguished professor of English at Randolph-Macon Woman’s College for many years, used to tell her students about the little theatre group who, when seeking Shaw’s permission to stage his best-known play, wrote to the author but made the mistake of phrasing their request: &dquo;Can we present your play, ’Pygmalion’?&dquo; Shaw promptly posted his response: &dquo;You may, but I doubt if you can.&dquo;