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JournalISSN: 2049-1115

Hau: The Journal of Ethnographic Theory 

HAU-N.E.T
About: Hau: The Journal of Ethnographic Theory is an academic journal published by HAU-N.E.T. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Ethnography & Politics. It has an ISSN identifier of 2049-1115. Over the lifetime, 857 publications have been published receiving 12909 citations. The journal is also known as: Journal of ethnographic theory.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a comparative study of the combinations made possible by the conjunction of a mode of identification and a relational schema is presented, showing that a well made experiment is enough to demonstrate a law.
Abstract: Between identification  , a means of specifying the properties of existing beings, and relations, a means of specifying the general form of the links between those beings, two kinds of connection are possible. Either the plasticity of a relational schema makes it possible for it to structure interactions in a variety of ontologies, which will then present a family likeness despite the heterogeneity of their essential principles; or, alternatively, one of the modes of identification is able to accommodate several distinct relational schemas and this introduces into an ontological configuration widely distributed in space (a cultural region, for example) the kind of concrete diversity of customs and norms from which ethnologists and historians love to draw their material. The second case is what we shall now be considering. However, the combinations made possible by the conjunction of a mode of identification and a relational mode are too numerous for us to consider them all in a systematic and detailed fashion, especially since some of them turn out not to be possible for reasons of logical incompatibility, as we shall soon see. So let us limit ourselves to considering the variations of ethos that various relational schemas imprint upon one particular mode of identification: this will be animism. The demonstration will certainly not be complete, but it will at least provide the beginnings of a proof that anthropology can always hope to find when it enters into some detail in a comparative study of a number of cases. As Mauss, mobilizing John Stuart Mill in his support, declared, ―a well made experiment is enough to demonstrate a law‖ (Mauss 1950: 391).

521 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors sketches some of the historical context and motivations of the writings on language and political economy in the 1980s-90s, comparing and highlighting the distinctly different motivations of different authors.
Abstract: This brief commentary sketches some of the historical context and motivations of the writings on language and political economy in the 1980s–90s, comparing and highlighting the distinctly different...

436 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that to attribute "ethnographicness" to encounters with those among whom we carry on our research, or more generally to fieldwork, is to undermine both the ontological commitment and the educational purpose of anthropology as a discipline, and of its principal way of working.
Abstract: Ethnography has become a term so overused, both in anthropology and in contingent disciplines, that it has lost much of its meaning. I argue that to attribute “ethnographicness” to encounters with those among whom we carry on our research, or more generally to fieldwork, is to undermine both the ontological commitment and the educational purpose of anthropology as a discipline, and of its principal way of working—namely participant observation. It is also to reproduce a pernicious distinction between those with whom we study and learn, respectively within and beyond the academy. Anthropology’s obsession with ethnography, more than anything else, is curtailing its public voice. The way to regain it is through reasserting the value of anthropology as a forward-moving discipline dedicated to healing the rupture between imagination and real life.

393 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors consider several emergent trends in anthropology since the 1980s against a backdrop of the rise of neoliberalism as both an economic and a governmental formation, and consider a range of work that is explicitly or implicitly a reaction to this dark turn, under the rubric of "anthropologies of the good, including studies of "the good life" and "happiness", as well as studies of morality and ethics.
Abstract: In this article I consider several emergent trends in anthropology since the 1980s against a backdrop of the rise of neoliberalism as both an economic and a governmental formation. I consider first the turn to what I call “dark anthropology,” that is, anthropology that focuses on the harsh dimensions of social life (power, domination, inequality, and oppression), as well as on the subjective experience of these dimensions in the form of depression and hopelessness. I then consider a range of work that is explicitly or implicitly a reaction to this dark turn, under the rubric of “anthropologies of the good,” including studies of “the good life” and “happiness,” as well as studies of morality and ethics. Finally, I consider what may be thought of as a different kind of anthropology of the good, namely new directions in the anthropology of critique, resistance, and activism.

357 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that a realist ontology, combined with broad theoretical relativism, is a more compelling political position than the "ontological anarchy" and theoretical intolerance of ontological turn exponents.
Abstract: As a response to Eduardo Viveiros de Castro’s critique of my essay “Fetishes are gods in the process of construction,” this paper enters into critical engagement with anthropological proponents of what has been called the “ontological turn.” Among other engagements, I note that my own reflections on Malagasy fanafody, or medicine, are informed by just the sort of self-conscious reflections my informants make on epistemology, something that anthropologists typically ignore. After making note of the arguments of Roy Bhaskar that most post-Cartesian philosophy rests on an “epistemic fallacy,” I further argue that a realist ontology, combined with broad theoretical relativism, is a more compelling political position than the “ontological anarchy” and theoretical intolerance of ontological turn exponents.

228 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202322
202297
202168
202079
201948
201856