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JournalISSN: 0935-560X

History & Memory 

Indiana University Press
About: History & Memory is an academic journal published by Indiana University Press. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): The Holocaust & World War II. It has an ISSN identifier of 0935-560X. Over the lifetime, 359 publications have been published receiving 4608 citations. The journal is also known as: History & memory.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a social-constructivist model of history, which presents nationalism and national identity as emerging under specific historical conditions rather than as given, and indicate instances of internal violence and suffering of others.
Abstract: Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot history schoolbooks adopted a similar model of ethnic nationalism focusing on the suffering of the Self and presenting an essentialist, unchanging view of national identity. However, the new books that recently appeared on the Turkish Cypriot side follow a social-constructivist model of history, which presents nationalism and national identity as emerging under specific historical conditions rather than as given. They avoid homogenizing assumptions by presenting internal differentiations, and indicate instances of internal violence and suffering of others. These changes have significant implications regarding notions of blame and trauma, and allow for identity to emerge as a political choice.

163 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors compare two instances of public discourse on history: the Historikerstreit (historians' debate) in Germany and the recent polemic between the so-called Old and New Historians in Israel.
Abstract: This study compares two instances of public discourse on history: the Historikerstreit (historians' debate) in Germany and the recent polemic between the so-called Old and New Historians in Israel. The well-known public debate in Germany was sparked off in July 1986 by an attack of the philosopher and social theorist Jiirgen Habermas on what he called "the apologetic tendencies in the writing of German contemporary history," which he published in the weekly Die Zeit. The current public debate in Israel started in June 1994 with a broadside fired by writer Aharon Megged in the daily Ha'Aretz against what he called "a suicidal

128 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Forging the nation's collective memory is an integral part of the process of nation building as discussed by the authors and the powerful link between history and memory is especially salient in the educational system, which is responsible for implanting knowledge and values in the younger generation.
Abstract: Forging the nation’s collective memory is an integral part of the process of nation building. The powerful link between history and memory is especially salient in the educational system, which is responsible for implanting knowledge and values in the younger generation. The successful completion of this task, it is assumed, will turn young people into loyal citizens and will help instill a shared identity. Interestingly enough, historians and sociologists generally fail to note the political and social links between school textbooks and collective memory. Scholars dealing with the tools used by the state to create its own collective memory—such as historiography, literature, cinema or national commemorations—tend to overlook the role played by textbooks. At the same time, scholars in the field of textbook research barely analyze them in the context of the attempts to build a collective memory, usually ignoring the social environment that helps shape textbook content as well. Since in many Western democracies, and certainly in nondemocratic societies, the state controls the educational apparatus, it can shape the nation’s collective memory by determining what is to be included and

110 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wang et al. as mentioned in this paper pointed out that during the 1950s and 1970s, China avoided history disputes with Japan to focus on geostrategic interests, and only from the early 1980s did domestic political incentives motivate Beijing to attack Japanese historical memory and promote assertive nationalism through patriotic history propaganda, which radicalized Chinese popular views about Japan.
Abstract: Ruling elites often make pernicious national myths for instrumental purposes, creating divergent historical memories of the same events in different countries. But they tend to exploit international history disputes only when they feel insecure domestically. Societal reactions to elite mythmaking, reflected in radicalized public opinion, can reinforce history disputes. During the 1950s–1970s, China avoided history disputes with Japan to focus on geostrategic interests. Only from the early 1980s did domestic political incentives motivate Beijing to attack Japanese historical memory and promote assertive nationalism through patriotic history propaganda, which radicalized Chinese popular views about Japan. Media highlighting of Japan's historical revisionism exacerbated societal demands to settle war accounts with Japan, while factional politics within the Chinese Communist Party made it difficult for the top leaders to compromise on the bilateral "history issue."

99 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202217
20203
201911
201810
201710
201611