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Showing papers in "Holocaust and Genocide Studies in 1995"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines Turkish efforts to deny the Armenian genocide of 1915-17 and exposes an arrangement by which the government of Turkey has channeled funds into a supposedly objective research institute in the United States, which in turn paid the salary of a historian who served that government in its campaign to discredit scholarship on the Armen genocide.
Abstract: This article examines Turkish efforts to deny the Armenian genocide of 1915-17. Specifically, it exposes an arrangement by which the government of Turkey has channeled funds into a supposedly objective research institute in the United States, which in turn paid the salary of a historian who served that government in its campaign to discredit scholarship on the Armenian genocide. After a short review of the Armenian genocide and a range of Turkish denial efforts, three documents are reproduced in full. They include a letter that Robert Jay Lifton received from the Turkish Ambassador to the United States, and two documents that were inadvertently included with the Lifton letter—a memorandum to the Turkish Ambassador and a draft letter to Lifton for the Ambassador's signature. After a critical analysis of each document, we discuss the harmful ness of genocide denial and explore why intellectuals might engage in the denial of known genocides. The article concludes with reflections on the relationship between scholars and truth.

57 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The methodology proposed in this article asserts that the individual's struggle reveals another perspective on the state of mind and the social order of various strata of Jewish society under Nazi occupation.
Abstract: Despite the dire circumstances of Jews under Nazi occupation, individuals continued to persevere in their efforts to maintain patterns of everyday life. An understanding of daily routines may help us comprehend the reality of the Holocaust, but it may also contribute to the trivialization and banalization of the topic. To counter this danger, the methodology proposed in this article asserts that the individual's struggle reveals another perspective on the state of mind and the social order of various strata of Jewish society under Nazi occupation. Invoking the concepts of Berger and Luckmann in their analysis of understanding the knowledge of everyday life, this article examines the perception of reality of intellectuals in the ghetto.

17 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Geographic location was one major factor that explains the greater survival rate of the Gypsies compared to that of the Jews as mentioned in this paper, as a consequence, survival rates were higher.
Abstract: While most of the research on the Holocaust has appropriately focused on the suffering of the Jewish population of Axis-occupied Europe, the Gypsies also were targeted for extinction by the Nazis. The Gypsies as a people survived the campaigns directed against them in large measure because they were located in areas under the control of governments allied with Germany. These governments generally refused to participate in the extermination of the Gypsies (just as some did not participate in the destruction of the European Jews). The majority of the Gypsy population in Axis Europe was beyond the direct control of the Nazi extermination machinery and, as a consequence, survival rates were higher. In contrast the European Jews were concentrated in areas under direct German control, and therefore the proportion of fatalities was much higher. Geographic location thus was one major factor that explains the greater survival rate of the Gypsies compared to that of the Jews.

8 citations



Journal ArticleDOI

5 citations