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JournalISSN: 2631-6188

Infectious diseases 

IntechOpen
About: Infectious diseases is an academic journal published by IntechOpen. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Medicine & Chlamydia. It has an ISSN identifier of 2631-6188.. The journal is also known as: IntechOpen book series infectious diseases.

Papers published on a yearly basis

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TL;DR: In this paper , the authors describe T. marneffei virulence factors that enhance the fungus capacity for survival and growth in the host to lead to disease, and discuss approaches for early diagnosis, which are essential to reduce the mortality rate in talaromycosis.
Abstract: Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus that causes talaromycosis, and the pathogen is found throughout tropical and subtropical Asia. T. marneffei has specifically emerged as an opportunistic fungal pathogen in individuals with advanced HIV disease and, to a lesser extent, other immunocompromised conditions, but more recently talaromycosis is increasingly described in immunocompetent people. Due to the high mortality rate of up to 50%, understanding T. marneffei interactions with host immune responses and diagnostic modalities is vital to the development of strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality. In this chapter, we describe T. marneffei virulence factors that enhance the fungus’ capacity for survival and growth in the host to lead to disease. We also discuss approaches for early diagnosis, which are essential to reduce the mortality rate in talaromycosis. Talaromycosis remains a neglected disease, but advances in our understanding of host-pathogen dynamics as well as the ongoing development of new diagnostic approaches are poised to enhance our capacity to combat this disease.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , an X-rayed antimalarial drug resistance (ADR) by plasmodium species with a particular focus on P. falciparum, which is the most deadly species of the malaria parasite responsible for over 90% of the global malaria burden domiciled in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Abstract: This chapter X-rayed antimalarial drug resistance (ADR) by plasmodium species with a particular focus on P. falciparum, which is the most deadly species of the malaria parasite responsible for over 90% of the global malaria burden domiciled in Sub-Saharan Africa. The introduction intently looked at malaria therapeutics across the decades and the development of drug resistance by the parasite. With the malaria parasite (P. falciparum) as the focal point, the mechanisms by which they develop resistance to antimalarial drugs was looked at, including factors affecting drug resistance development. Armed with this knowledge, the chapter also highlighted the therapeutic interventions taken against this hydra-headed monster together with their limitations and recent advances towards addressing those limitations or opening new frontiers for research exploration. Future perspectives that will provide research strategy and direction as possible tools for combating drug resistance development by the malaria parasite were also discussed.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The relationship between colonisation and disease among those with no previous exposure to healthcare remains untouched as discussed by the authors , and identifying the antibiotic-resistant pattern is critical to determine the appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment.
Abstract: Staphylococcus aureus is a common human pathogen that can cause mild superficial infections to deep-seated abscesses and sepsis. One of the characteristics of S. aureus is the ability to colonise healthy individuals while leaving them asymptomatic. These carriers’ risk harbouring an antibiotic-resistant strain that may be harmful to the individual and the community. S. aureus carriage in healthcare personnel is being studied extensively in many parts of the world. However, the relationship between colonisation and disease among those with no previous exposure to healthcare remains untouched. Colonisation of the nasal cavity and its surrounding by pathogenic organisms such as S. aureus leads to the increased risk of infection. Hospital-acquired infections associated with S. aureus infections are common and studies related to these types of infections among various study groups are largely documented. However, over the last decade, an increase in community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has been noted, increasing the need to identify the prevalence of the organism among healthy individuals and assessing the antibiotic resistance patterns. Systemic surveillance of the community for colonisation of S. aureus and identifying the antibiotic-resistant pattern is critical to determine the appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the main virulence factors that allow bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, including the accessory gene regulator genes (agr), related to colonization and persistence of Staphylococcus aureus are described.
Abstract: Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that can colonize the nose, pharynx, and other regions of the body. It has also been observed that it can cause persistence. Successful colonization of S. aureus depends in the factors that favor the interaction of the bacteria with host cells. The bacterial determinants of S. aureus that have the capacity to adhere to human tissues involve adhesion factors such as teichoic acids and cell-wall-anchored proteins (CWA) such as ClfA, IcaA, SdrC, FnBPA, among others. The colonization and persistence process first involve adhesion to the tissue, followed by its reproduction and the possible formation of a biofilm. This review will describe the main virulence factors that allow bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, including the accessory gene regulator genes (agr), related to colonization and persistence of S. aureus.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A comprehensive overview of recent studies and developments in the field of Infectious Diseases can be found in this paper , which is an annual collection of reviewed and relevant research chapters authored by various researchers.
Abstract: This book is an annual collection of reviewed and relevant research chapters authored by various researchers, offering a comprehensive overview of recent studies and developments in the field of Infectious Diseases. It joins work from four areas in this field, Bacterial, Fungal, Parasitic, and Viral Infectious Diseases, each edited by an expert. The global challenges and different living circumstances for people around the globe ask for a deep understanding of various aspects and properties of infectious diseases to ensure a safer and healthier cohabitation of humans and pathogens.

1 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202382
20228