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JournalISSN: 0020-7136

International Journal of Cancer 

About: International Journal of Cancer is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Cancer & Population. It has an ISSN identifier of 0020-7136. Over the lifetime, 25890 publication(s) have been published receiving 1414586 citation(s). The journal is also known as: Int J Cancer.

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Topics: Cancer, Population, Breast cancer ...read more
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Estimates of the worldwide incidence and mortality from 27 major cancers and for all cancers combined for 2012 are now available in the GLOBOCAN series of the International Agency for Research on Cancer. We review the sources and methods used in compiling the national cancer incidence and mortality estimates, and briefly describe the key results by cancer site and in 20 large “areas” of the world. Overall, there were 14.1 million new cases and 8.2 million deaths in 2012. The most commonly diagnosed cancers were lung (1.82 million), breast (1.67 million), and colorectal (1.36 million); the most common causes of cancer death were lung cancer (1.6 million deaths), liver cancer (745,000 deaths), and stomach cancer (723,000 deaths).

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21,991 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Jacques Ferlay1, Hai-Rim Shin1, Freddie Bray1, David Forman1  +2 moreInstitutions (3)
TL;DR: The results for 20 world regions are presented, summarizing the global patterns for the eight most common cancers, and striking differences in the patterns of cancer from region to region are observed.

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Abstract: Estimates of the worldwide incidence and mortality from 27 cancers in 2008 have been prepared for 182 countries as part of the GLOBOCAN series published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In this article, we present the results for 20 world regions, summarizing the global patterns for the eight most common cancers. Overall, an estimated 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occur in 2008, with 56% of new cancer cases and 63% of the cancer deaths occurring in the less developed regions of the world. The most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide are lung (1.61 million, 12.7% of the total), breast (1.38 million, 10.9%) and colorectal cancers (1.23 million, 9.7%). The most common causes of cancer death are lung cancer (1.38 million, 18.2% of the total), stomach cancer (738,000 deaths, 9.7%) and liver cancer (696,000 deaths, 9.2%). Cancer is neither rare anywhere in the world, nor mainly confined to high-resource countries. Striking differences in the patterns of cancer from region to region are observed.

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20,379 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: GLOBOCAN 2000 updates the previous data-based global estimates of incidence, mortality and prevalence to the year 2000 and uses a “databased” approach, rather different from themodeling method used in other estimates.

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Abstract: Describing the distribution of disease between different populations and over time has been ahighly successfu l way of devising hypothese s about causation and for quantifying the potential for preventive activities.1 Statistical data are also essentia l componentsof diseasesurveillanceprograms. Theseplay acritical role in the developmen t and implementation of health policy, through identification of health problems, decisions on priorities for preventive and curative programs and evaluation of outcomes of programs of prevention, early detection/screenin g and treatment in relation to resource inputs. Over the last 12 years, aseries of estimates of the global burden of cancer have been published in the International Journal of Cancer. 2–6 The methods have evolved and been refined, but basically they rely upon the best availabl e data on cancer incidence and/or mortality at country level to build up theglobal picture. The results are more or less accurat e for different countries, depending on the extent and accuracy of locally availabl e data. This “databased” approach is rather different from themodeling method used in other estimates. 7–10 Essentially, these use sets of regression models, which predict cause-specifi c mortality rates of different populations from the correspondin g all-cause mortality.11 The constant s of the regression equations derive from dataset s with different overal mortality rates (often including historic data from wester n countries) . Cancer deaths are then subdivided into the different cancer types, according to the best availabl e information on relative frequencies. GLOBOCAN 2000 updates thepreviousl y published data-based global estimates of incidence, mortality and prevalence to the year 2000.12

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3,650 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The sources and methods used in compiling the cancer statistics in 185 countries are reviewed, and uncertainty intervals are now provided for the estimated sex‐ and site‐specific all‐ages number of new cancer cases and cancer deaths.

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Abstract: Estimates of the worldwide incidence and mortality from 36 cancers and for all cancers combined for the year 2018 are now available in the GLOBOCAN 2018 database, compiled and disseminated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). This paper reviews the sources and methods used in compiling the cancer statistics in 185 countries. The validity of the national estimates depends upon the representativeness of the source information, and to take into account possible sources of bias, uncertainty intervals are now provided for the estimated sex- and site-specific all-ages number of new cancer cases and cancer deaths. We briefly describe the key results globally and by world region. There were an estimated 18.1 million (95% UI: 17.5-18.7 million) new cases of cancer (17 million excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) and 9.6 million (95% UI: 9.3-9.8 million) deaths from cancer (9.5 million excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) worldwide in 2018.

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3,021 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Donald Maxwell Parkin1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: The fraction of the different types of cancer, and of all cancers worldwide and in different regions, has been estimated using several methods; primarily by reviewing the evidence for the strength of the association (relative risk) and the prevalence of infection in different world areas.

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Abstract: Several infectious agents are considered to be causes of cancer in humans. The fraction of the different types of cancer, and of all cancers worldwide and in different regions, has been estimated using several methods; primarily by reviewing the evidence for the strength of the association (relative risk) and the prevalence of infection in different world areas. The estimated total of infection-attributable cancer in the year 2002 is 1.9 million cases, or 17.8% of the global cancer burden. The principal agents are the bacterium Helicobacter pylori (5.5% of all cancer), the human papilloma viruses (5.2%), the hepatitis B and C viruses (4.9%), Epstein-Barr virus (1%), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) together with the human herpes virus 8 (0.9%). Relatively less important causes of cancer are the schistosomes (0.1%), human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (0.03%) and the liver flukes (0.02%). There would be 26.3% fewer cancers in developing countries (1.5 million cases per year) and 7.7% in developed countries (390,000 cases) if these infectious diseases were prevented. The attributable fraction at the specific sites varies from 100% of cervix cancers attributable to the papilloma viruses to a tiny proportion (0.4%) of liver cancers (worldwide) caused by liver flukes.

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2,628 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202235
2021559
2020668
2019626
2018572
2017532

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Journal's top 5 most impactful authors

Silvia Franceschi

199 papers, 19.8K citations

George Klein

185 papers, 10.2K citations

Anne Tjønneland

169 papers, 8.8K citations

Elio Riboli

155 papers, 11.1K citations

Carlo La Vecchia

144 papers, 8.2K citations