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JournalISSN: 1556-8865

International Journal of Doctoral Studies 

Informing Science Institute
About: International Journal of Doctoral Studies is an academic journal published by Informing Science Institute. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Higher education & Qualitative research. It has an ISSN identifier of 1556-8865. It is also open access. Over the lifetime, 318 publications have been published receiving 7567 citations. The journal is also known as: Doctoral studies & IJDS.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper tracks a Grounded Theory research project undertaken to study the phenomena of collaboration and knowledge sharing in the Australian Film Industry and uses this to illustrate and emphasize salient points to assist potential users in applying the method.
Abstract: Selecting the most appropriate research method is one of the most difficult problems facing a doctoral researcher. Grounded Theory is presented here as a method of choice as it is detailed, rigorous, and systematic, yet it also permits flexibility and freedom. Grounded Theory offers many benefits to research in Information Systems as it is suitable for the investigation of complex multifaceted phenomena. It is also well equipped to explore socially related issues. Despite existing criticism, it is a rigorous and methodical research approach capable of broadening the perceptions of those in the research community. This paper provides detailed and practical guidelines that illustrate the techniques, utility, and ease of use of grounded theory, especially as these apply to information systems based research. This paper tracks a Grounded Theory research project undertaken to study the phenomena of collaboration and knowledge sharing in the Australian Film Industry. It uses this to illustrate and emphasize salient points to assist potential users in applying the method. The very practical approach shared in this paper provides a focused critique rendering it a valuable contribution to the discussion of methods of analysis in the IS sphere, particularly grounded theory.

305 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Delphi Method as discussed by the authors uses a panel of experts to achieve consensus in solving a problem, deciding the most appropriate course of action, or establishing causation where none previously existed, particularly in areas of business or education research.
Abstract: Among the typical dissertation research designs, one particular design that is slowly gaining acceptance is that of the Delphi Method. Using a panel of experts to achieve consensus in solving a problem, deciding the most appropriate course of action, or establishing causation where none previously existed, particularly in areas of business or education research, are uniquely ideal to employment of the design. This article reviews the origins of the method, provides detail on assembling the panel and executing the process, gives examples of conventional and modified Delphi designs, and summarizes the inherent advantages and disadvantages that the design brings. The article closes with some advice for those contemplating its use in their dissertations.

233 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Ali et al. as discussed by the authors found that doctoral student attrition is linked to stress and feelings of social isolation, which is a silent epidemic in the U.S. doctoral degree attrition.
Abstract: Introduction The doctoral degree is considered the pinnacle of education, and it is pursued by nearly 100,000 students in the U.S. (Carnegie Classification, n.d.). Doctoral students are among the best and brightest students, having championed the highly competitive selection process (Ali & Kohun, 2006; Gilliam & Kitronis, 2006). However, 50% of doctoral students will not finish their degree (Walker, Golde, Jones, Bueschel, & Hutchings, 2008), and 40,000 drop out every year (Ali & Kohun, 2007). In fact, many leave their programs in the first year (Esping, 2010; Lovitts, 2001). Doctoral student attrition is a silent epidemic in the U.S. (Ali & Kohun, 2007; Lovitts, 2001). Through empirical investigation, researchers have found that doctoral student attrition is linked to two main factors, stress (Lovitts, 2001) and feelings of social isolation (Ali & Kohun, 2006; Hawlery, 2003; Lewis, Ginsberg, Davies, & Smith, 2004). First, with regard to stress, doctoral students typically " ... face enormous demands upon their time, energy, intelligence, endurance, patience, and organizational skills" (Committee on the College Student, 2000, p. 1); all of which heighten their stress level. Greater stress is experienced when it involves multiple and persistent stressors, rather than a single event (Cohen & Wills, 1985). Doctoral students are significantly more stressed than the general public, and they report that their stress is mainly attributed to their graduate programs (Cahir & Morris, 1991). The stressors of doctoral study include relative poverty, anxiety, sleeplessness, academic demands, fear of failure, examinations, and time constraints (Bowman & Bowman, 1990; Esping, 2010). Additionally, doctoral students also find themselves having to manage the socialization into their new roles, building and maintaining new relationships, and creating their professional identity (Golde, 1998; Lee, 2009; Weidman, Twale, & Stein, 2001). Because of these demands placed on doctoral students, their stress levels persist, and even increase, as they progress through their programs (Cahir & Morris, 1991). The second factor linked to doctoral student attrition is the feeling of social isolation, which refers to the absence of meaningful social connections (Hortulanus, Machielse, & Meeuwesen, 2006; Lovitts, 2001). The social connections that are important for doctoral students include those with fellow students, faculty members, and their superiors (Ali & Kohun, 2007). Feelings of social isolation stem from confusion about program expectations and miscommunication (or a lack of communication) with their peers and faculty (Ali & Kohun, 2006; Lovitts, 2001). Social isolation is often exacerbated by being in a new, unfamiliar, and stressful environment, all of which are traits common to doctoral programs (Ali & Kohun, 2007; Lovitts, 2001). Literature Review Social Support A construct termed social support can offer doctoral students a sense of refuge by reducing both stress and feelings of social isolation (Ali & Kohun, 2006; Hadjioannou, Shelton, Fu, & Dhanarattigannon, 2007). Social support typically stems from people to whom one is socially tied (e.g., family members and friends) and is defined as what they "say and do regarding stressful events" (Lakey & Orehek, 2011, p. 482). A social support network is comprised of several individuals within one's environment who influence one's perceptions of his or her environment and might include family members, friends, and co-workers (Kelly, 2005). Social support can take various forms, including emotional support (attempts to alleviate negative affect), professional support (mentoring and guidance), and practical support (money or help with task completion) (Heller & Rook, 1997; House, 1981; Nelson & Brice, 2008; Rosenholtz, 1989; Schaefer, Coyne, & Lazarus, 1981; Singh & Billingsley, 1998). …

229 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the feeling of isolation among doctoral students; its origin and the effect it has on the decision of the students to leave doctoral programs, and suggest counter measures to this feeling.
Abstract: This paper discusses the feeling of isolation among doctoral students; its’ origin and the effect it has on the decision of the students to leave doctoral programs. The paper explains the development of isolation feeling within four stages of completing the program. It explains how each stage contributes to increasing the feeling of isolation among the students and then suggests counter measures to this feeling. Last, the paper presents the experience of a particular university located in Western Pennsylvania; the doctoral program of Information Systems and Communications (DISC) at Robert Morris University (RMU) that has been able to graduate students at a rate that is substantially higher than the national average.

219 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wao et al. as discussed by the authors found that 40% to 60% of doctoral candidates at some stage in the process fail to demonstrate doctoral persistence; that is, they do not achieve their goal of earning a terminal degree.
Abstract: Introduction Doctoral persistence is "the continuance of a student's progress toward the completion of a doctoral degree" (Bair, 1999, p. 8). Studies over the last four decades show that 40% to 60% of doctoral candidates at some stage in the process fail to demonstrate doctoral persistence; that is, they do not achieve their goal of earning a terminal degree (Berelson, 1960; Bowen & Rudenstine, 1992; Council of Graduate Schools Ph.D. Completion Project, 2008). This phenomenon of doctoral persistence and its converse, attrition, is most puzzling given that "Paradoxically, the most academically capable, most academically successful, most stringently evaluated, and most carefully selected students in the entire higher education system--doctoral students--are the least likely to complete their chosen academic goals" (Golde, 2000, p. 199). In education graduate programs, the attrition rate is estimated to be 50% (Ivankova & Stick, 2007), and some reports indicate it may be as high as 70% (Nettles & Millet, 2006). Between 1983 and 2008 time-to-degree completion for graduate students in education programs increased from 11.7 years to 12.7 years, while decreasing from 8.2 years to 7.7 years in all other fields (National Science Foundation [NSF], 2009; Wao & Onwuegbuzie, 2011). Nettles and Millet (2006) found that across disciplines, education ranked lowest in doctoral student publications (15% compared to 30%) and presentations (30% compared to 37%). The nature and responsibility of doctoral students enrolled in education programs may contribute to these statistics. The typical doctoral education student works full time (e.g., principal, administrator, teacher), with academic responsibilities serving to intensify demands on their energy, commitment, and time (Dorn, Papalewis, & Brown, 1996; Jimenez, 2011; Smith, Maroney, Nelson, Abel, & Abel, 2006). Full time employment constricts students to studying part time, and research suggests that part-time doctoral students experience longer time-to-degree rates than those who are engaged full-time (Wao & Onwuegbuzie, 2011). Attrition and prolonged time-to-degree can be costly to institutions, but devastating and demoralizing for students as a result of the financial, personal, and professional consequences (Lovitts, 2001; Terrell, Snyder, & Dringus, 2009; Wao, 2010). With education students experiencing the longest time-to-degree rates (NSF, 2009) and consistently high attrition rates (50%-%) (Ivankova & Stick, 2007; Nettles & Millet, 2006), research examining factors associated with persistence is timely and pertinent. The purpose of this study was to learn from individuals with earned educational doctorates the personal, social, and institutional factors they attributed to their doctoral persistence and degree completion. The theory of resilience and Tinto's (1975, 1993) student integration theory served as the conceptual framework for this study. Conceptual Framework At its simplest, resilience is defined as success despite adversity (Cefai, 2004; Luthar, Cicchetti, & Becker, 2000). While resilience research traditionally focused on generating lists of risk and protective factors (see Garmezy, 1971; Werner, Bierman, & French, 1971), resilience is now viewed as the interaction between the individual and resources and stressors in the larger sociocultural context (Clauss-Ehlers, 2008; Luthar et al., 2000). Thus, resilience research is nested within an ecological model that emphasizes contextual factors and interactions between individuals and their environment. Given attrition statistics, beginning a doctoral degree involves risk. Brailsford (2010) observed, "There is a body of quantitative and qualitative research proving that deciding to do a Ph.D. is a high-risk strategy" (p. 15). Moreover, candidates beginning doctoral degrees in education are particularly at high risk given statistics suggesting that the likelihood that they will earn their doctorate hovers between 50% and 30% (Ivankova & Stick, 2007; Nettles & Millet, 2006). …

218 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202310
202225
202133
202035
201937
201827