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JournalISSN: 0197-9183

International Migration Review 

Wiley-Blackwell
About: International Migration Review is an academic journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Population & Immigration. It has an ISSN identifier of 0197-9183. Over the lifetime, 3581 publications have been published receiving 166057 citations. The journal is also known as: IMR.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The institution of Citizenship in France and Germany is discussed in this article, where Citizenship as Social Closure is defined as social closure and Citizenship as Community of Descent as community of origin.
Abstract: Preface Introduction: Traditions of Nationhood in France and Germany I. The Institution of Citizenship 1. Citizenship as Social Closure 2. The French Revolution and the Invention of National Citizenship 3. State, State-System, and Citizenship in Germany II. Defining The Citizenry: The Bounds of Belonging 4. Citizenship and Naturalization in France and Germany 5. Migrants into Citizens: The Crystallization of Jus Soli in Late-Nineteenth-Century France 6. The Citizenry as Community of Descent: The Nationalization of Citizenship in Wilhelmine Germany 7. \"Etre Francais, Cela se Merite\": Immigration and the Politics of Citizenship in France in the 1980s 8. Continuities in the German Politics of Citizenship Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index

2,803 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the social theory and consequent methodology that underpins studies of transnational migration and pointed out that assimilation and enduring transnational ties are neither incompatible nor binary opposites.
Abstract: This article explores the social theory and consequent methodology that underpins studies of transnational migration. First, we propose a social field approach to the study of migration and distinguish between ways of being and ways of belonging in that field. Second, we argue that assimilation and enduring transnational ties are neither incompatible nor binary opposites. Third, we highlight social processes and institutions that are routinely obscured by traditional migration scholarship but that become clear when we use a transnational lens. Finally, we locate our approach to migration research within a larger intellectual project, taken up by scholars of transnational processes in many fields, to rethink and reformulate the concept of society such that it is no longer automatically equated with the boundaries of a single nationstate. Social scientists have long been interested in how immigrants are incorporated into new countries. In Germany and France, scholars’ expectations that foreigners will assimilate is a central piece of public policy. In the United States, immigration scholars initially argued that to move up the socioeconomic ladder, immigrants would have to abandon their unique customs, language, values, and homeland ties and identities. Even when remaining ethnic became more acceptable, most researchers assumed that the importance of homeland ties would eventually fade. To be Italian American or Irish American would ultimately reflect ethnic pride within a multicultural United States rather than enduring relations to an ancestral land. Now scholars increasingly recognize that some migrants and their descendants remain strongly influenced by their continuing ties to their home country or by social networks that stretch across national borders. They see

2,141 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that assimilation theory has not lost its utility for the study of contemporary immigration to the United States and some of the evidence about the socioeconomic and residential assimilation of recent immigrant groups is sifted through.
Abstract: Assimilation theory has been subject to intensive critique for decades. Yet no other framework has provided the social science community with as deep a corpus of cumulative findings concerning the incorporation of immigrants and their descendants. We argue that assimilation theory has not lost its utility for the study of contemporary immigration to the United States. In making our case, we review critically the canonical account of assimilation provided by Milton Gordon and others ; we refer to Shibutani and Kwan's theory of ethnic stratification to suggest some directions to take in reformulating assimilation theory. We also examine some of the arguments frequently made to distinguish between the earlier mass immigration of Europeans and the immigration of the contemporary era and find them to be inconclusive. Finally, we sift through some of the evidence about the socioeconomic and residential assimilation of recent immigrant groups. Though the record is clearly mixed, we find evidence consistent with the view that assimilation is taking place, albeit unevenly

1,984 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Monica Boyd1
TL;DR: An overview of research findings on the determinants and consequences of personal networks is presented and it calls for greater specification of the role of networks in migration research and for the inclusion of women in future research.
Abstract: Family, friendship and community networks underlie much of the recent migration to industrial nations Current interest in these networks accompany the development of a migration system perspective

1,677 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A series of studies of acculturative stress involving immigrants, refugees, Native peoples, sojourners and ethnic groups in Canada is reported in this paper, which is defined as a reduction in he...
Abstract: A series of studies of acculturative stress is reported, involving immigrants, refugees, Native peoples, sojourners and ethnic groups in Canada. Acculturative stress is defined as a reduction in he...

1,665 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202389
202294
202172
202052
201948
201847