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JournalISSN: 1560-7755

International Review of the Red Cross 

Cambridge University Press
About: International Review of the Red Cross is an academic journal published by Cambridge University Press. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): International humanitarian law & International law. It has an ISSN identifier of 1560-7755. Over the lifetime, 1649 publications have been published receiving 19349 citations. The journal is also known as: International review of the Red Cross.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A sense of self-perceived collective victimhood emerges as a major theme in the ethos of conflict of societies involved in intractable conflict and is a fundamental part of the collective memory of the conflict as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: A sense of self-perceived collective victimhood emerges as a major theme in the ethos of conflict of societies involved in intractable conflict and is a fundamental part of the collective memory of the conflict. This sense is defined as a mindset shared by group members that results from a perceived intentional harm with severe consequences, inflicted on the collective by another group. This harm is viewed as undeserved, unjust and immoral, and one that the group could not prevent. The article analyses the nature of the self-perceived collective sense of victimhood in the conflict, its antecedents, the functions that it fulfils for the society and the consequences that result from this view.

346 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The role of faith-based organizations, particularly Christian organizations, in humanitarian assistance within the broader context of the NGO world is examined in this article, where the authors suggest that much more work is needed in the area of capacity-building of local humanitarian organizations and in the coordination of NGO programmatic work.
Abstract: This article examines the role of faith-based organizations, particularly Christian organizations, in humanitarian assistance within the broader context of the NGO world. Following an overview of the historical development of these organizations, the article examines the current context in which faith-based and secular humanitarian organizations operate. The different roles played by these organizations are explored, as are some of the difficulties they encounter. The article suggests that much more work is needed in the area of capacity-building of local humanitarian organizations and in the coordination of NGO programmatic work.

193 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that the human rights to life and due process imply a specific duty with respect to a broad range of automated and autonomous technologies, and they argue that it would be beneficial to establish this duty as an international norm, and express this with a treaty, before the emergence of an autonomous system that is likely to pose grave threats to the basic rights of individuals.
Abstract: This article considers the recent literature concerned with establishing an international prohibition on autonomous weapon systems. It seeks to address concerns expressed by some scholars that such a ban might be problematic for various reasons. It argues in favour of a theoretical foundation for such a ban based on human rights and humanitarian principles that are not only moral, but also legal ones. In particular, an implicit requirement for human judgement can be found in international humanitarian law governing armed conflict. Indeed, this requirement is implicit in the principles of distinction, proportionality, and military necessity that are found in international treaties, such as the 1949 Geneva Conventions, and firmly established in international customary law. Similar principles are also implicit in international human rights law, which ensures certain human rights for all people, regardless of national origins or local laws, at all times. I argue that the human rights to life and due process, and the limited conditions under which they can be overridden, imply a specific duty with respect to a broad range of automated and autonomous technologies. In particular, there is a duty upon individuals and states in peacetime, as well as combatants, military organizations, and states in armed conflict situations, not to delegate to a machine or automated process the authority or capability to initiate the use of lethal force independently of human determinations of its moral and legal legitimacy in each and every case. I argue that it would be beneficial to establish this duty as an international norm, and express this with a treaty, before the emergence of a broad range of automated and autonomous weapons systems begin to appear that are likely to pose grave threats to the basic rights of individuals.

191 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The United Nations Human Rights Conference held in Tehran in 1968 marked the beginning of a growing use by the United Nations of humanitarian law during its examination of the human rights situation in certain countries or during its thematic studies.
Abstract: International humanitarian law is increasingly perceived as part of human rights law applicable in armed conflict. This trend can be traced back to the United Nations Human Rights Conference held in Tehran in 1968 which not only encouraged the development of humanitarian law itself, but also marked the beginning of a growing use by the United Nations of humanitarian law during its examination of the human rights situation in certain countries or during its thematic studies. The greater awareness of the relevance of humanitarian law to the protection of people in armed conflict, coupled with the increasing use of human rights law in international affairs, means that both these areas of law now have a much greater international profile and are regularly being used together in the work of both international and non-governmental organizations.

157 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20235
202279
202127
202038
201944
201818