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JournalISSN: 1752-9719

International Theory 

Cambridge University Press
About: International Theory is an academic journal published by Cambridge University Press. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): International relations & Politics. It has an ISSN identifier of 1752-9719. Over the lifetime, 329 publications have been published receiving 7764 citations. The journal is also known as: Journal of international politics, law and philosophy.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors define the concept of authority-politicization nexus and argue that the increasing authority of international institutions has led to their politicization and relate this hypothesis to alternative explanations.
Abstract: The article focuses on the politicization of international authority as a thus far little understood development in world politics. We first define the concept and show that there is an empirical trend towards politicization of international institutions. We then argue that the increasing authority of international institutions has led to their politicization and we relate this hypothesis to alternative explanations. The validity of the authority–politicization nexus is illustrated by the rise of international authority in parallel to politicization. We go on to distinguish different policy functions such as rule definition, monitoring, interpretation, and enforcement in order to show that especially those international institutions with a high level of authority meet with strong contestation of their competencies. We conclude the article by exploring various avenues for future politicization research.

381 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors survey the development of the respective debates and then offer a path forward, arguing that the key challenge is to theorize the processes through which individual emotions become collective and political, and further suggest that this is done best by exploring insights from two seemingly incompatible scholarly tendencies: macro theoretical approaches that develop generalizable propositions about political emotions and micro approaches that investigate how specific emotions function in specific circumstances.
Abstract: Emotions play an increasingly important role in international relations research. This essay briefly surveys the development of the respective debates and then offers a path forward. The key challenge, we argue, is to theorize the processes through which individual emotions become collective and political. We further suggest that this is done best by exploring insights from two seemingly incompatible scholarly tendencies: macro theoretical approaches that develop generalizable propositions about political emotions and, in contrast, micro approaches that investigate how specific emotions function in specific circumstances. Applying this framework we then identify four realms that are central to appreciating the political significance of emotions: (1) the importance of definitions; (2) the role of the body; (3) questions of representation; and (4) the intertwining of emotions and power. Taken together, these building blocks reveal how emotions permeate world politics in complex and interwoven ways and also, once taken seriously, challenge many entrenched assumptions of international relations scholarship.

254 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that even in international relations social respect can be a significant goal, both for instrumental reasons and as an end in itself In fact, as long as we ignore this dimension of international politics we will be unable to fully explain major features, specifically the intensity and duration of many cross-border conflicts.
Abstract: In our daily lives few things are as important to us as being treated with respect Yet in International Relations (IR), we regularly assume that actors follow just their material interests or the social norms appropriate for their identity, without caring if the treatment they get matches their own sense of importance and worth Drawing mostly on insights from moral philosophy and social psychology this article argues that even in international relations social respect can be a significant goal, both for instrumental reasons and as an end in itself In fact, as long as we ignore this dimension of international politics we will be unable to fully explain major features, specifically the intensity and duration of many cross-border conflicts To show the perspectives which systematic research on respect may open for IR, this article presents a theoretical overview of the chief factors that shape the reactions to respectful or disrespectful behavior

182 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argued that group-level emotion is powerful, pervasive, and irreducible to individuals, and argued that people do not merely associate with groups (or states), they can become those groups through shared culture, interaction, contagion, and common group interest.
Abstract: Can one use emotion at anything other than the individual level of analysis? Emotion happens in biological bodies, not in the space between them, and this implies that group emotion is nothing but a collection of individuals experiencing the same emotion. This article contends that group-level emotion is powerful, pervasive, and irreducible to individuals. People do not merely associate with groups (or states), they can become those groups through shared culture, interaction, contagion, and common group interest. Bodies produce emotion that identities experience: group-level emotion can be stronger than, and different from, emotion experienced as an individual; group members share, validate, and police each others’ feelings; and these feelings structure relations within and between groups in international politics. Emotion goes with identity.

164 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe how fear and empathy may be institutionalized, discuss the relationship between these emotions, and suggest how empathy may serve as both a mirror and potential antidote to individual and institutionalized fear.
Abstract: Emotions are a ubiquitous intersubjective element of world politics. Yet, passions are often treated as fleeting, private, reactive, and not amenable to systematic analysis. Institutionalization links the private and individual to the collective and political. Passions may become enduring through institutionalization, and thus, as much as characterizing private reactions to external phenomena, emotions structure the social world. To illustrate this argument, I describe how fear and empathy may be institutionalized, discuss the relationship between these emotions, and suggest how empathy may be both a mirror and potential antidote to individual and institutionalized fear.

140 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202317
202237
202145
202033
201915
201810