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JournalISSN: 0021-1400

Irish Theological Quarterly 

SAGE Publishing
About: Irish Theological Quarterly is an academic journal published by SAGE Publishing. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Faith & Philosophy. It has an ISSN identifier of 0021-1400. Over the lifetime, 1004 publications have been published receiving 2639 citations. The journal is also known as: The Irish theological quarterly.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Gallie has remained courageously non-conformist in his philosophical interests and not afraid to be unfashionable in his treatment of them, showing how philosophy is enriched by these interests, how it is impoverished by their neglect.
Abstract: Professor Gallie has remained courageously non-conformist. He is unconventional in his philosophical interests and not afraid to be unfashionable in his treatment of them. Few British philosophers today are interested as Gallie is in the philosophy of art, of politics, of the human sciences, of religion, of history. This book does much to show how philosophy is enriched by these interests, how it is impoverished by their neglect. ’

105 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: D Daly as mentioned in this paper traces the recorded attitude of the Catholic Church towards women throughout its history and concludes that women have been conditioned to consider themselves inferior to men, and therefore actually to be infeiior to men.
Abstract: Dr Mary Daly, assistant professor of theology at Boston College, traces the recorded attitude of the Catholic Church towards women throughout its hist0ry.l She takes as starting point the indictment of the Church made by Simone de Beauvoir in The Second Sex, examines the evidence and finds the case proven. De Beauvoir’s position is that women have been conditioned to consider themselves to be, and therefore actually to be infeiior to men. Some of the blame for this situation attaches to the Church, which accepted as the God-given norm the existing Hebrew patriarchal organisation of society (where men were active and the rulers and women were passive and the ruled) and which incorporated the values of this particular society into its canon law and general teaching. As examples, Dr Daly produces a succession of interesting quotations from eminent churchmen. Among them are Paul: ‘I permit no woman to teach or to have authority over men; she is to keep silent’ (I Tim 2,13) and: ‘As the Church is subject to Christ, SO let wives be subject in everything to their husbands’ (Eph. 5, 24); Jer0me:‘For love befits the man, fear befits the woman. As for the Slave not only fear is befitting him, but also trembling’ (Daly, p. 45); Tertullian: ‘Do YOU know that you are Eve, the devil’s gateway? How easily YOU destroy man, the image of God, Because of the death you brought upon Us, even the Son of God had to die’ @. 45) ; Aquinas : ‘Man is the beginning and end of woman; as God is the beginning and end of every mxture’ (P. 51). When European society at last began to move towards the emancipation of women, the official Church lagged behind educated opinion and in Dr ~ a l y ’ s words, ‘manifested the persistence of the conflict between the Christian concept of women as Persons, made to the image of God, and the notion of them as inferior, derivative beings’ (p. 65). She quotes Leo XJII: ‘women, again, are not suited for certain occupations; a woman is by nature fitted for home work, and it is that which is best adapted at once to preserve her modesty and to produce the good bringing up of children and the well-being of the f d y ’ (p. 66). Puis XII: ‘. . . a true woman cannot see and fully understand all the problems of human life otherwise

60 citations

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55 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

47 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the impact of detraditionalization on Christian faith is investigated, and what the appropriate theological response may be, and the main lines are sketched of what the author calls a "theology of interruption", understood as both interrupted theology as well as interrupting theology.
Abstract: The category of detraditionalization, in combination with the category of pluralization, it is argued, offers a conceptual framework to think anew the 'transformation of religion' in so-called postsecular Europe. Subsequently the impact of this transformation on Christian faith is investigated, and what the appropriate theological response may be. Beyond mere continuity and discontinuity between faith and contemporary context, the main lines are sketched of what the author calls a 'theology of interruption', understood as both 'interrupted theology' as well as 'interrupting theology'.

39 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202321
202247
20214
202018
201916
201811